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"World Health Minute" 22 May, 2017

News Highlights
Cholera cases in Yemen could hit 300,000 within six months: WHO Yemen could have as many as 300,000 cases of cholera within six months and an “extremely high” number of deaths, the World Health Organization said Friday. “We need to expect something that could go up to 200,000-250,000 cases over the next six months, in addition to the 50,000 cases that have already occurred,” Nevio Zagaria. WHO Yemen representative, told reporters in Geneva by phone. The cost in lives from this will be will be “extremely, extremely high,” he said.
The challenge that awaits a new leader of the WHO The Financial Times hails the forthcoming selection of a new leader for the World Health Organization. It goes on to stress that he or she needs to reform the WHO’s sclerotic bureaucracy, focus its work on priorities and stand up to national governments and industry lobbies if the agency’s role is to remain relevant. It says national governments need to be pushed into disclosing infections that pose a global threat. WHO needs to pare back its priorities and focus more on prevention in combatting non-communicable diseases. This may mean tackling the food and pharmaceutical industries, as it did with tobacco
Wanted: Top doctor to care for 7 billion people The BBC reviews the forthcoming election for director general of the World Health Organization. It looks at the three remaining candidates and their track records and discusses the history of WHO and its achievements. It also puts into perspective some of the challenges a new leader will have to address on taking office
Preparedness, surveillance and response
Swine flu back in the city, 53 test positive
A city hospital has confirmed four swine flu-related deaths since January this year, with three of the four deaths recorded in April. In all, 53 people have tested positive for the H1N1 virus across Delhi and the surrounding areas up to May 5th this year, according to health authority data. But, the government has denied any swine flu related deaths in the capital
Suman 16 casos de dengue clasico en Matamoros
Mexico - There were two new cases of dengue in Matamoros which takes this year’s total up to 16. There have been only two cases of Zika to date and as yet no case of chikungunya
Residents flee as suspected cases of Ebola outbreak in Congo grow
USA Today reports on the examples of residents aware of the Ebola outbreak in Bas-Uele province, 51 hours away from Kinshasa, fleeing to the capital. They told reporters there are no hospitals or medical facilities in this region, people are not aware of the virus and they do not know what precautions to take so many may die. There is also fear residents from the outbreak area could bring the disease to the capital
We Know Zika Is A Big Problem In Puerto Rico. We Just Don’t Know How Big.
A JAMA paediatrics study published in October 2016 predicted that Puerto Rico would see 110 to 290 Zika-related microcephaly cases between mid-2016 and mid-2017. But at the last count there were only 16 babies born with microcephaly, a staggeringly low number given the island has had 3,200 cases confirmed zika cases in pregnant women since the beginning of the outbreak. Sources told Stat News Puerto Rico may be under reporting the Zika problem for fear of harming the tourism business
Cholera cases in Yemen could hit 300,000 within six months: WHO
Yemen could have as many as 300,000 cases of cholera within six months and an “extremely high” number of deaths, the World Health Organization said Friday. “We need to expect something that could go up to 200,000-250,000 cases over the next six months, in addition to the 50,000 cases that have already occurred,” Nevio Zagaria. WHO Yemen representative, told reporters in Geneva by phone. The cost in lives from this will be will be “extremely, extremely high,” he said.
WHO Optimistic on Controlling DRC Ebola Outbreak
WHO’s regional chief for Africa reported that the prospects of controlling the spread of the deadly Ebola virus in the DRC are good. While not underestimating the difficulties that lie ahead in bringing this latest outbreak of Ebola to an end, Matshidiso Moeti told VOA she is “very encouraged by the speed with which the government and its national and international partners have responded to the crisis”
Fever grips Kerala – 68 deaths reported – Thiruvananthapuram worst hit with 2,214 dengue cases
Up to the middle of May this year 68 people in Kerala have died from dengue fever, according to data provided by the state health services. The number of fever cases reported were 9,549, among which were 1,173 from Thiruvananthapuram. A total of 332 dengue fever cases were also reported. Dengue cases from Thiruvananthapuram stood at 171
Piura afronta la peor epidemia de dengue, ya hay 22 muertos
Piura - The number of deaths from dengue has risen again to 22 in just the first five months of this year, this is already as many deaths as were recorded during the whole of last year
Cusco: confirman tres muertes por dengue en La Convención
In the province of La Convencion in the Cusco region of Peru, to date this year, there have been 278 cases of dengue, of which 215 occurred in Pichari and 63 in Kimbiri. Now the health authorities in the Pichari-Kimbiri region said they have just had three deaths from dengue
Febre chikungunya já matou oito no Estado
Brazil – Chikungunya has killed eight people in Ceara since the start of 2017. In addition to the deaths there have been 47,591 reports of possible chikungunya, of which 16,185 cases have been confirmed. Overall, the tally of the three principal diseases transmitted by the Aedes aegypti mosquito in Ceara now stands at 24,000 people across the state according to health authorities
Lanarkshire hepatitis A outbreak total rises to 61
The number of confirmed cases of hepatitis A linked to a bakery in North Lanarkshire has increased to 61. Some people can become infected and have no symptoms for weeks and infect others. Others fall ill sooner. Authorities are seeking to raise awareness of this outbreak and urge people to seek medical assistance if they see symptoms
Cholera kills two in Kenyan capital, five hospitalized: official
Cholera killed two people in the Kenyan capital and another five are hospitalised receiving treatment a Nairobi health official told Reuters. The victims were part of a larger group of about 400 guests who attended a wedding in a Nairobi neighbourhood where food was provided by a catering company
Mozambique declares end to cholera epidemic that infected over 2,000
Mozambique has declared an end to a cholera epidemic that was triggered by heavy rains and infected more than 2,000 people, a senior government official said on Friday. The outbreak was another setback for Mozambique, which is grappling with a financial and debt crisis as it strives to woo investors to develop huge offshore gas reserves. "The epidemic is under control: in the last 28 to 29 days we have not registered new cases of cholera and so we are declaring the epidemic terminated," Francisco Mbofana, national director of public health, told a news conference. Five cholera treatment centers installed in the most affected provinces have already been dismantled, Mbofana said.
Congo has 29 suspected cases of deadly Ebola virus, says World Health Organisation
The World Health Organization says Congo now faces 29 suspected cases of the deadly Ebola virus. WHO spokesman Christian Lindmeier today said the number includes two laboratory-confirmed deaths. Officials announced the outbreak of the hemorrhagic fever a week ago in a remote area of northern Congo. Lindmeier says Congo authorities and its health partners are monitoring another 416 people who could have come into contact with the suspected cases. The Ebola outbreak is the eighth in Congo since 1976.
World Health Assembly terms Pakistan a model to respond to disease outbreaks
Pakistan was held up as a model for countries attending the WHA, as the first nation to conduct Joint External Evaluation of Core Capabilities to respond to disease outbreaks and level of preparedness to deal with pandemics
Brace for dengue surge
The dengue epidemic has reached alarming levels this year with more than 45,000 dengue patients reported in the first 5 months of the year. According to health experts, some 117 people have died of dengue and 46,669 cases have been reported, with many government institutions guilty of failing to destroy mosquito breeding places. In 2016 the total number of dengue cases reported was 55,150 and 88 people died. The numbers in the first six months of 2017 look set to surpass the numbers for the whole of 2016
Dengue fever reported in Kisumu
Kisumu County has reported its first locally-acquired dengue fever; weeks after some 153 related cases were confirmed in Mombasa. Chief Executive Officer of Health Dr Ojwang Lusi said a 16-year-old Chavakali High School student tested positive for the disease. The student was diagnosed at Aga Khan Hospital in Kisumu on May 12. “He complained of general malaise, joint pains, fever and headache,’’ said Dr Lusi. He tested positive but was quickly treated and discharged yesterday.
Health systems
How did HIV drugs worth 1.8 billion Naira expire in Nigeria?
The Nigerian minister of health said over $3bn worth of HIV drugs expired in storage. This could mean that Nigeria’s stock of HIV drugs is low. The Minister blamed incompetence and poor knowledge of healthcare workers saying there is no excuse for the waste as it adds to the massive cost involved in the HIV prevention campaign
Sanofi rejects US Army request for ‘fair’ pricing for a Zika vaccine
Sanofi Pasteur has rejected a request from the US Army to set an affordable US price for a Zika vaccine that the company is developing with American taxpayer funds, prompting an angry response from Senator Bernie Sanders. For months, Sanders has pushed the Army to negotiate a more favourable arrangement with Sanofi, who has already received a $43m U.S. research grant. But Sanofi recently refused, according to an Army timeline of events
Drugs Watchdog in London Courted With Spanish Lessons, Childcare
Brexit has sparked a fight to lure the European Medicines Agency away from London with almost two dozen countries extending a list of perks to their pitch to host the EU regulator. Finding a new home for highly trained scientists and researchers who assess drugs and examine factories in Europe is critical for the global pharmaceutical industry and the likelihood of leaving London and uncertainty of a new location is prompting staff departures
Clock is ticking for WHO decision over Taiwan
An editorial in Nature Magazine discusses the history of the World Health Organization and its decision to not invite Taiwanese health authorities to the World Health Assembly. The suggestion is there is a risk that this will allow regional politics to hamper public health as it makes disease outbreak management harder – the magazine points to the 2003 SAR virus outbreak as evidence. Nature cites some health experts as calling for Taiwan not to be excluded but others say it is not a problem as the meeting is largely symbolic
Research pledge must go further
Leading funders and researchers agreed that all their clinical trials for vaccines and devices would in future by publicly registered and the results published. The pledge, made by nearly a dozen groups including the Wellcome Trust and the UK Medical Research Council, is a boost for innovation and safety. Some estimates suggest that half of all trial findings are not made public, notably those that do not yield positive results. This is a waste of research, burying information which could better direct future work and reduce danger for patients and boost efficiency
Chance of newborn survival: Somalia better off than India
India has fallen 11 places in the Global Burden of Disease rankings for healthcare access to 154th position in the new study published in The Lancet. India’s downward slide indicates it has failed to achieve healthcare targets, especially on neonatal disorders, maternal health, tuberculosis and rheumatic heart disease
G20 health ministers agree to tackle antibiotics resistance
Health ministers of the G20 leading economies, meeting for the first time on Saturday, agreed to work together to tackle issues such as a growing resistance to antibiotics and to start implementing national action plans by the end of 2018
2016 sees 302 attacks on health care in 20 countries: WHO
According to WHO, in the first quarter of 2017, there have been some 88 attacks on health facilities and at least 80 people have been killed. WHO said attacks on health workers and ambulances continue with alarming frequency and they have direct consequences for health service delivery, depriving people of often urgently needed care
Communicable diseases
Cash makes a good home for disease-causing bacteria, says study
Cash may be more filthy and disgusting than first thought, according to new research. Ordinary banknotes can carry harmful varieties of bacteria and could be an effective medium for spreading infectious diseases among people, a new study published in Frontiers in Microbiology said. Banknotes ‘absorb’ bacteria from other environments and potential pathogens live quite well on the banknote surface, many of which are pathogenic. It is quite possible that bacteria from cash could be contributing to resistance to the antibiotics to fight bacterial infections
Aedes consegue transmitir zika, dengue e chikungunya na mesma picada, diz estudo
The Aedes aegypti mosquito can transmit Zika, Dengue and Chikungunya in the same bite, a new study by Colorado State University researchers indicates. The results were published in Nature Communications and researchers say they shed some light on how multiple viruses occur. They say the mechanism is still not fully understood and there needs to be further research work in this field
Pakistan made tremendous progress in eradication of polio: Saira
Pakistan’s Minister of State for National Health Services, Regulations and Coordination said Pakistan has made tremendous progress in eradicating polio with the lowest ever case count last year and only two cases so far this year. The Minister said they are carrying out aggressive surveillance for polio and established 53 environmental sampling sites – the biggest surveillance network in the world
Italy passes law obliging parents to vaccinate children
Italy’s government declared a new law making a series of childhood vaccinations a condition of school inscription in a move triggered by a spike in measles. Vaccinations covering 12 common diseases will be required to register children for state childcare and elementary school up to the age of six. At that point when school attendance becomes compulsory in Italy parents will be liable for fines if their children are not vaccinated
‘Kissing bug’ disease more deadly than thought
In a study published in PLOS Neglected Tropical Diseases, infection with Chagas was found to increase the risk of death by two to three times. Though the disease is generally considered to be mild or even asymptomatic among most cases, a new study has found that deaths fuelled by the infection are much common than we know and are going unrecognised
This gene variant can mitigate malaria risk by 40 percent
Researchers have managed to identify a gene variant which has the potential of reducing the risk of severe malaria by at least 40%. The study identified a genetic rearrangement of red blood cell glycophorin receptors – GYPA and GYPB genes which are unusually common in Africa – which confers a 40% reduced risk from severe malaria
Engineered protein enlisted to battle the MERS virus
Researchers converted a staple human ubiquitin protein into an anti-viral tool. Through subtle tweaks, they created an engineered version of the ubiquitin that binds more tightly and paralyzes a key enzyme in MERS to halt viral replication in cells. This custom-engineered protein destroyed the deadly virus in the lab, it could become a sweeping anti-viral in medicine in farming
Video: India`s battle against `superbugs`
France24 looks briefly back at the case of NDM-1 and its various mutations which spread to over 70 countries while authorities argued over its name. It points out India was losing nearly 52,000 newborn infants to antibiotic resistance each year. It emphasized how easy it is to buy antibiotics over the counter in any pharmacy in India and the urgent need to educate people about antibiotic resistance and its dangers
Investment in health is the foundation for sustainable development
The incoming head of The Global Fund to Fight Aids, Tuberculosis and Malaria, Marike Wijnroks, writes an opinion article for the Thomson Reuters Foundation in which she makes a case for the three pillars that make up the development agenda: improving sustainability, building resilience and assuming responsibility. Ensuring their application to public health and global health security mitigates the vulnerability to disease which can cause catastrophic loss of life and social upheaval
UNAIDS renews call for more research into HIV vaccine
UNAIDS is renewing calls for continued research to find a vaccine for the disease whose 20th HIV Vaccine Awareness Day falls on Thursday. Despite the success in scaling up treatment and ongoing prevention programmes, there are still large numbers of people infected with HIV each year. Even if a 90% reduction in HIV infections is achieved by 2030, there will still be around 20,000 new HIV infections annually. This shows how essential a vaccine for the long-term control of HIV is
WHO fear over fall in HPV take up
The World Health Organization joined a chorus of concern at the steep decline in uptake rates in Ireland for the HPV vaccine, which helps protect against cervical cancer. The uptake target is 87% which it reached in 2014/15, however, recent estimates put the uptake rate at about 50%. Health Protection Scotland says its most recent research shows a 90% decrease in HPV infections in Scotland because it has consistently achieved HPV vaccine uptake of more than 85% since the vaccine was introduced in 2008
Non communicable diseases
With mental health problems, fitness is tied to reduced risk of death
With the prevalence of mental health issues, people are facing many stressors in their daily lives stimulating feelings of depression, anxiety and other mental disorders. Medication to treat these mental problems is not only expensive but comes with side effects such as weight gain. Researchers found that higher levels of cardiovascular fitness helped people cope better with emotional distress meaning they were less likely to die
Thiruvananthapuram: Lifestyle diseases make dengue-hit vulnerable
The state has close to a 20% diabetic population which is also susceptible to vector borne diseases. The Deccan Chronicle suggests ‘lifestyle diseases are inversely proportionate to resistance to infections which compounds the dengue problem.’ Higher cholesterol, sugar levels and blood pressure may lower the resistance of people across the state to dengue, thus, increasing the risk of morbidity and mortality due to fever
Gutka freely available in Tamil Nadu despite ban: Study
A recent ban on gutka products in the state has not taken them off the shelves but only made them more expensive, a new study says. More than 90% of smokeless tobacco users have no difficulty in procuring banned gutka products but pay double the price to buy it. Cancers linked to tobacco cause hundreds of thousands of deaths each year and are a huge economic burden on the state. This represents 1.16% of the GDP and one-third of these deaths are preventable
Scientists to test whether Zika can kill brain cancer cells
Scientists in Britain plan to harness the Zika virus to try to kill brain tumour cells in experiments they say could lead to new ways to fight an aggressive type of cancer. The research will focus on glioblastoma, the most common form of brain cancer, which has a five-year survival rate of barely five percent
Pro-tobacco group takes prime space to praise govt crackdown on NGOs
An Indian NGO called the Federation of All India Farmer Association (FIFA) describes itself as ‘a non-profit federation whose mission is to support the farming community in India and create a sustainable future for farmers.’ In its latest ad hoarding campaign it has taken billboards outside the Health Ministry praising the action of the ministry in taking action against some NGOs, which it says take foreign cash and who pressurise Indian farmers. In this case it is backing the action of the ministry in moving against Public Health Foundation of India for allegedly lobbying against tobacco and violating foreign funding norms
Africa must reboot its health systems to cope with non-communicable diseases
It is estimated that there will be well over 3m deaths from these diseases in Africa by 2020. The rising burden will hit health, economic productivity and the social fabric of societies. What is needed is an approach that upgrades quality and efficiency of the healthcare interventions currently in place. It requires information on gaps in the healthcare system so policymakers know how best to help
Draft Cancer Resolution Might Be Set For Approval At World Health Assembly
According to sources, countries have agreed in the nick of time on a draft resolution on cancer prevention, control and access to cancer medicines, and in particular, the price of new cancer medicines, to be examined at the World Health Assembly. If the resolution passes there will be a technical report for January 2019 looking at pricing approaches, including transparency, the impact of availability and affordability for medicines for the prevention and treatment of cancer
Philippines` tough public smoking ban gets broad support
A Philippine ban on smoking in public places received broad support as anti-tobacco activists hailed it as a victory and some smokers said they were now prepared to kick the habit. Even the industry lobby group, the Philippine Tobacco Institute said it supported the regulation and acknowledged the health objectives
Promoting health through the life course
Donald Trump vs. Women’s Health
In the US delayed detection is one of the reasons that a disease like cervical cancer has one of the lowest survival rates in the developed world. This is due in some part to lack of healthcare insurance cover, where women seek help far too late. In addition, Trump is undermining the fight against cervical cancer by seeking to defund Planned Parenthood, which performs some 270,000 cervical screenings annually. Then there is the expanded global gag rule which slashes abortion advice and the cut-off of funds for the UN Population Fund, another major player in reducing cervical cancer deaths
Malabon winning the battle against malnutrition
The city of Malabon in the Philippines started educating mothers about the risks of stunting in children some three years ago, backed by local businesses who helped in the pooling of resources in local intervention programmes. In just three years stunting rates for children shrank by half from 16.3% in 2013 to 8.52% in 2016
South African men march against abuse of women and children
Hundreds of South Africans who have been angered by a rise in violence against women and children took to the streets and marched in protest, calling for action, in the South African capital Pretoria
World lags on clean-energy goals
It may be the 21st century but more than 3bn people still use fire for cooking and heating. Of those, 1bn people have no access to electricity, despite a global effort launched at the 2011 Vienna Energy Forum to bring electricity to everyone on the planet. The 2015 SDG 7 was a unanimous promise to bring decarbonized, decentralized energy to everyone, and that this would transform the world bringing clean air, new jobs, warm schools, clean buses, pumped water and better yields of nutritious food. Speakers at the Vienna Energy Forum said we are falling behind and need to move faster in pursuit of this goal
Virtual pictures of overweight children as adults trialled to shock parents into action
Health experts in a part of the UK have adapted 3D modelling techniques to encourage families of overweight youngsters to make major lifestyle changes. Parents have been shown virtual images of their children as overweight adults to shock them into action in a new strategy aimed at reducing health risks associated with obesity. Parents saw digitally manipulated pictures of their children in adulthood and in many cases were shocked into making major lifestyle changes in a trial run by experts at the University of Newcastle involving 2,200 families
Two Bengaluru women to get uterine transplants, move sparks row
Although this is a clinical trial overseen by the ICMR regulator, activists are posing the question as to whether women should undergo invasive procedures to have a biological baby. Activists are claiming it is not therapy or alleviating pain or illness or saving a life, it is making opportunistic use of the pressure on women to give birth
Rescued migrants tell of detention, beatings, slavery in Libya
Libya is sliding deeper into lawlessness. Smugglers are packing record numbers onto unsafe boats with sea arrivals in Italy up by 35%. MSF, one of the few aid agencies entering Libyan government controlled migrant camps said it had witnessed adult malnutrition, overcrowding, violence-related injuries and a lack of basic hygiene. Reports from migrants reaching Italy as refugees say the Libyan militia groups ‘believe blacks are slaves and they beat them, lock them up and mistreat them’. Despite the EU agreeing to funnel millions of Euros to the UN backed government in Tripoli to open migrant centres to be managed by UN agencies, these centres have yet to be opened as it is too dangerous
Arctic stronghold of world’s seeds flooded after permafrost melts
Containing a million packets of seeds, each a variety of important food crops, the Global Seed Vault on the Norwegian island of Spitsbergen was expected to be a failsafe, a protection against the challenges of natural or man-made disasters. It was recently flooded after extraordinary winter temperatures melted the permafrost and sent meltwater gushing into the tunnel entrance
Spain sex trafficking case lodged to U.N. shows lack of protection for victims - charity
After being trafficked to Spain and forced into prostitution, Gladys John was detained by police in 2010 and deported just days later, said Women’s Link Worldwide, which represented John at the time. The legal charity submitted John’s case to the UN’s Committee Against Torture on Friday, saying she was tortured as a sex trafficking victim and then again by the Spanish police. She was held in a detention centre, though she was a victim not a criminal, and was 11 weeks pregnant but received no prenatal care in detention. It was inhuman and degrading treatment
Facebook and Twitter `harm young people`s mental health`
Four of the five most popular forms of social media harm young people’s mental health, with Instagram the most damaging, according to research by two health organizations. The four platforms have a negative effect because they can exacerbate children’s and young people’s body image worries, and worsen bullying, sleep problems and feelings of anxiety, depression and loneliness, the participants said
Around 2,305sq kilometere of India`s forest cover could be wiped out by 2025 ISRO study
A staggering 2,305km of forest cover in northeast India and the Andaman & Nicobar Islands – slightly more than the size of Mauritius, could disappear by 2025, a simulation study by ISRO scientists has predicted. Published in the Journal of Earth System Science in February, the study investigated the distribution of forest cover in India and predicted the ever continuing deforestation in selected parts of India with high deforestation rates
Threat of malnutrition still high in Somalia despite onset of rains: ICRC
Rains in Somalia have brought some relief from drought but malnutrition remains a threat, the Red Cross said, with the number of children admitted to its feeding centres nationwide nearly doubling over the last year. In addition to food shortages, Somalia is experiencing a rapid spread of cholera, with more than 20,000 cases reported nationwide. The outbreak is expected to worsen due to the rains
The challenge that awaits a new leader of the WHO
The Financial Times hails the forthcoming selection of a new leader for the World Health Organization. It goes on to stress that he or she needs to reform the WHO’s sclerotic bureaucracy, focus its work on priorities and stand up to national governments and industry lobbies if the agency’s role is to remain relevant. It says national governments need to be pushed into disclosing infections that pose a global threat. WHO needs to pare back its priorities and focus more on prevention in combatting non-communicable diseases. This may mean tackling the food and pharmaceutical industries, as it did with tobacco
This World Health Organization Leadership Election Is Crucial, And It’s Getting Ugly
Ezkiel Emanuel writes an article for the Huffington Post in which he offhandedly dismisses the chances of Dr Sania Nishtar to become director general of WHO, arguing it is a battle between Dr David Nabarro and Tedros Adhanom. He then dismissed allegations made by Larry Gostin of Georgetown Law School, who alleged Tedros Adhanom and the Ethiopian government covered up cholera outbreaks going back to 2006, calling them acute watery diarrhoea. Emanuel said these were unfounded and believes Tedros to be the best candidate for DG
Cholera risks Addis bid for top WHO job
A group of African diplomats defended their candidate for the director general role at WHO against charges that he covered up cholera outbreaks in Ethiopia. The New York Times story pointed out that Ethiopia had called these earlier outbreaks acute watery diarrhoea instead of cholera. It also pointed out there are now more than 16,000 cases of AWD diagnosed in the country’s Somali region this year too
How to Fix the WHO
The writers call for a stronger centralized reporting and operational structure which would enhance WHO ability to command and control projects. This would assist in better streamlining resource allocation and improve crisis management response. A centralized budget linked to NGOs would provide funding flexibility to cover regional funding shortfalls, reducing reliance on private funding. The writers call on the new director-general to restructure WHO with an eye to meet the demands of the 21st century
Why I run
Ethiopian Olympic athlete Feyisa Lilesa calls out Tedros Adhanom’s bid to become director general of the World Health Organization, listing a series of allegations that suggest he has been less than truthful about his time as health minister and that the Ethiopian government’s human rights record in his native Oromo region is
3 vie for top WHO post in UN health agency election
The publication takes a look at the WHO DG election and briefly runs a slide rule over the three candidates and their backgrounds. It also outlines the challenges the organization faces moving forward
African Ambassadors Urge Support for Dr Tedros Adhanom, the African Union-Endorsed Candidate for World Health Organization Director-General
African ambassadors from Ethiopia, Mozambique, Rwanda issued a statement urging support for Dr Tedros Adhanom’s candidacy to become director general of the World Health Organization
Tedros Adhanom receives massive support from African ambassadors to UN
African ambassadors from Ethiopia, Mozambique, Rwanda issued a statement urging support for Dr Tedros Adhanom’s candidacy to become director general of the World Health Organization
Int’l women declaration adds to momentum behind Dr Sania Nishtar’s WHO bid
The National Commission on the Status of Women in Pakistan has called upon women all over the world to support the candidacy of Dr Sania Nishtar to become the next director general of the World Health Organization
Int’l women declaration adds to momentum behind Dr Sania Nishtar’s WHO bid
The National Commission on the Status of Women in Pakistan has called upon women all over the world to support the candidacy of Dr Sania Nishtar to become the next director general of the World Health Organization
Search for WHO DG: Trust is key, says `hands-on` candidate Nabarro
The Daily Maverick interviews candidate to become the next director general of the World Health Organization David Nabarro. It highlights his vast array of experience across the spectrum of medicine, including working on tasks for WHO itself. His many years working on the frontline in wars and community health and development programmes and in research. His work for Na Ki-moon in tackling food riots in 2008 and in leading the UN’s effort to repair the difficult situation on Ebola in West Africa in 2014, where WHO’s response was slow when the crisis erupted
China warns Taiwan of continued lockout from WHO assembly
China’s health minister has all but slammed the door on any more participation for Taiwan at the World Health Organization’s annual assembly until the island accepts the ‘One China’ principle. Health Minister Li Bin blamed the Taiwanese President’s party, saying its refusal to accept the idea of a single China has torpedoed its ambitions to attend, leading to the first lock out of Taiwan as an observer state since 2008
Ethiopia’s Cholera-Denying Candidate to Lead the World`s Top Health Body is Taking a Battering Online
Thousands of tweets, several open letters and a relentless online campaign have dogged Ethiopia’s candidate for the World Health Organization director-general position, Tedros Adhanom, as member states prepare to vote on May 23rd. The article refers to allegations that Adhanom covered up a cholera outbreak during his tenure as Ethiopia’s health minister. It also mentioned that ‘he did not like mentioning a certain disease’ and a letter in the Lancet alleged Adhanom’s indifference towards huge tobacco industry deals struck by the Ethiopian government with both Japanese and British tobacco companies
Wanted: Top doctor to care for 7 billion people
The BBC reviews the forthcoming election for director general of the World Health Organization. It looks at the three remaining candidates and their track records and discusses the history of WHO and its achievements. It also puts into perspective some of the challenges a new leader will have to address on taking office
The Ethiopian who aims to lead WHO: Support and criticisms trail
The Slovak and the African, Caribbean and Pacific Group of States are said to be backing the candidacy of Tedros Adhanom to become the next director general of the World Health Organization. But at the same time. Tedros’ campaign is dogged by controversy. Africa News cites allegations made by Larry Gostin about Tedros covering up cholera outbreaks in Ethiopia during his time as health minister
The Ethiopian who aims to lead WHO: Support and criticisms trail
The Slovak and the African, Caribbean and Pacific Group of States are said to be backing the candidacy of Tedros Adhanom to become the next director general of the World Health Organization. But at the same time. Tedros’ campaign is dogged by controversy. Africa News cites allegations made by Larry Gostin about Tedros covering up cholera outbreaks in Ethiopia during his time as health minister
Three health experts emerge finalists for top job at WHO in its first-ever election
First Post considers the track records of the three candidates vying to become the next director-general of the World Health Organization. It considers the issues facing WHO and the plans it has to lay out on issues like the fight against polio, preparedness for pandemic flu and antimicrobial resistance
Shut out of U.N. forum, Taiwan slams China`s `coercion and threats`
Taiwan hopes its allies will stand up to China’s ‘coercion and threats’ that have shut it out of the UN’s annual World Health Assembly, Taiwanese Health Minister Chen Shih-Chung told Reuters
Physician’s letter in Lancet casts new shadow on Tedros WHO bid
The physician who leads the Africa Tobacco-Free Initiative published an open letter in The Lancet speaking out against the candidacy of Tedros Adhanom to become director general of the World Health Organization. He raised questions about the Ethiopian government’s deal-making role in a tobacco industry at odds with global health goals. Ashall references Ethiopia’s sale of shares in its National Tobacco Enterprise in 2016, a U.S.$510m deal overseen by two Ethiopian ministers and celebrated as an inroad into the Ethiopian market by Japan Tobacco International. This deal falls foul of the WHO Framework on Tobacco Control, and ‘as a former health minister aiming to become DG of WHO Tedros should have spoken out publicly against this tobacco deal,’ Ashall said
David Nabarro: The WHO must change, and I am the right person to deliver that change
WHO director general candidate David Nabarro makes the case as to why he should lead the World Health Organization. He outlines his long track record of experience working in the global public health field and details aspects of his vision to improve how the World Health Organization operates
An election that could seriously improve our health
The Financial Times’ Gillian Tett reports that the 193 members of the UN are meeting next week to cast their ballot to select the next head of the World Health Organization. She outlines the three candidates and their contrasting styles of leadership and underscores some of the challenges facing the organization in a new Trump funding age
What we know as WHO heads into historic election
Devex objectively looks at the three candidates to become director-general of the World Health Organization and makes a stab at assessing how the world’s delegations may be planning to vote next Tuesday and their reasons why. The publication considers the chances of each candidate in the context of what is known so far and puts Tedros Adhanom ahead, by implication at least, but not by much, stressing ‘many countries are keeping their cards close and anything can happen with a secret ballot’
As WHO Director-General Election Nears, Ethiopia’s Candidate Is Accused of Cholera Cover-Ups
The New York Times article quoting Lawrence Gostin’s allegations against Tedros Adhanom, in which he accused him of covering up cholera outbreaks in Ethiopia during his time as health minister, was hailed by Ethiopian activist opponents of the main government party. An ex-Reuters journalist working in Ethiopia at that time was quoted as saying these allegations were consistent with what he had seen when he worked there