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"World Health Minute" 30 May, 2017

News Highlights
Cholera kills 248 in South Sudan - UN At least 248 people have died from a cholera outbreak across 19 counties in South Sudan since the initial outbreak was reported in June last year, the UN said. OCHA said that as of May 15th there have been 8,160 cholera cases since that initial case last year. Nine out of the 19 counties affected by the cholera outbreak since last June have reported cholera cases in the last four weeks and are considered to have active transmission of the disease
WHO’s Identity Crisis Given that President Trump is proposing funding caps on a whole host of UN agencies, the recent travel expenses at WHO report could not have come at a worse time for the agency, which is facing a severe funding shortfall. Dr Tedros will need to move swiftly to bring transparency and accountability to the WHO to demonstrate that every dollar is well spent. The world desperately needs a fully functioning WHO and must hope that in Dr Tedros the organization has found the leadership it needs to overcome its current woes
Sri Lanka`s flood survivors threatened by dengue, disease: aid workers Thousands of survivors of devastating floods and landslides in Sri Lanka are at risk of potentially fatal diseases such as dengue fever, charities warned as the death toll from the disaster continued to rise. "The threat of water-borne diseases is a big concern with over 100,000 people displaced from their homes, many of whom are staying in damp, crowded conditions," Chris McIvor, head of Save the Children Sri Lanka, told the Thomson Reuters Foundation. "I`m particularly worried we could start seeing even more dengue cases because of the floods, as stagnant water provides the perfect breeding ground for mosquitoes. It`s the last thing needed by communities that have already lost so much"
Zika may cause eye problems in foetuses Research shows there may be a link between the Zika virus and a number of neurological disorders including the Guillain-Barre syndrome and microcephaly. It could result in brain damage, disability, weakness, paralysis and could impact long-term memory. It could also lead to depression in some. This new research shows abnormalities in the eyes, which as part of the central nervous system, under develop in the foetus during pregnancy
Preparedness, surveillance and response
Laos facing challenges in preventing dengue fever
Laos health authorities confirmed that they are still facing challenges in preventing dengue this year, as reported rates of cases increased from March to May 26 this year, and the dengue infection rates in the capital Vientiane were higher than other provinces in the country which saw a combined total of 268 cases, with, of these, Vientiane seeing 70 dengue cases recorded
Dengue fever may reach epidemic levels in Yangon this year
The Myanmar Public Health Department has recorded nearly 2,000 cases of dengue throughout the country in the first quarter of 2017 and more than half of these were recorded in the Yangon Region, marking a steep rise since last year while, the department reported 1,924 cases nationwide, there were 1,104 cases in the Yangon region – nine have been fatal so far
Baby the latest victim of dengue in New Caledonia
A six month old baby has died from dengue fever in New Caledonia, according to the newspaper Les Nouvelles Caledoniennes the baby died from the mosquito born disease last week and she was the ninth person to die from dengue during the current outbreak. There have been more than 3,500 cases of dengue to date, with 500 hospitalised since January
Nearly 100 cases of chikungunya in Delhi, 40 of dengue
At least 96 cases of chikungunya have been reported in Delhi this year, with 10 of them being recorded this month, just as authorities are gearing up to combat any outbreak situation of the vector-borne disease. As many as 4,431 cases of dengue were reported up till the end of 2016. To date, there have been 40 cases of dengue according to municipal authorities
Would have tested if we knew, say doctors
Some Indian doctors expressed consternation that the Gujarat authorities have known about three Zika cases and did not make the information more widespread. A physician in Bapungar was quoted as saying he’d seen what he thought were a few cases of severe dengue which he would have tested for Zika had he known. Gujarat’s health commissioner said the NIV Pune has yet to give a report on the gene sequencing of the virus to pinpoint its origin. He added that the first Zika case detected in November 2016 was only confirmed by the NIV on January 4th 2017, still not fully answering why the lack of transparency
Congo approves use of Ebola vaccination to fight outbreak
DRC’s health ministry has approved the use of a new Ebola vaccine to counter an outbreak in its northeast that has killed four people, a spokesman said. The vaccine, known as rVSV-ZEBOV and developed by Merck, is not yet licensed but was shown to be highly protective against Ebola in clinical trials published at the end of last year. A WHO spokesperson said that the vaccination would be deployed ‘should an EVD laboratory confirmed case be identified outside the already defined chains of transmission’
Changing patterns of this year’s swine flu outbreak has Indian health authorities flummoxed
India has recorded nearly 9,000 infections and 882 deaths caused by the H1N1 virus since January, leaving doctors, scientists and government authorities baffled at their inability to control the swine flu it causes. Maharashtra is the worst hit, followed by Tamil Nadu, Karnataka, Telangana and Kerala. In Kerala there are guidelines to administer oseltamivir to patients in vulnerable groups with H1N1, in 15 out of the 40 H1N1 deaths reported in Kerala, patients did not receive oseltamivir. In the other cases the drug was administered at a much later stage of the infection
WHO deploys new technology for Ebola fight
WHO said it has deployed new technology that allows for rapid diagnosis of the Ebola virus in the DRC. One of the technologies being used to detect Ebola is GeneXpert, which was primarily developed to detect cases of TB, but has been adapted to enable rapid testing of many pathogens. At the INRB lab in Kinshasa technicians can use it to test for the Zaire strain of Ebola in just one hour. Other tests deployed include OraQuick which can test blood or saliva samples for Ebola in just half an hour
25 cases of cholera reported at Kakuma Refugee Camp
There were further reports of the outbreak of cholera in Kakuma Refugee Camp where 25 cases have been confirmed. Those affected are mainly refugees from the Dinka community who recently streamed in from South Sudan as a result of tensions in the country. Kakuma Camp is home to 169,203 refugees out of whom 90,446 are from South Sudan
Sri Lanka`s flood survivors threatened by dengue, disease: aid workers
Thousands of survivors of devastating floods and landslides in Sri Lanka are at risk of potentially fatal diseases such as dengue fever, charities warned as the death toll from the disaster continued to rise. "The threat of water-borne diseases is a big concern with over 100,000 people displaced from their homes, many of whom are staying in damp, crowded conditions," Chris McIvor, head of Save the Children Sri Lanka, told the Thomson Reuters Foundation. "I`m particularly worried we could start seeing even more dengue cases because of the floods, as stagnant water provides the perfect breeding ground for mosquitoes. It`s the last thing needed by communities that have already lost so much"
Sespa investiga primeiro caso suspeito de febre amarela silvestre em Aveiro
The Brazilian health authorities in the state of Para have confirmed the first case of yellow fever in the state as a 19 year old man has been transferred to the ICU of the Regional Hospital of Baixo Amazonas
Febre amarela silvestre já matou mais de oitenta pessoas no Espírito Santo
There have been 82 deaths confirmed from yellow fever in the state of Espírito Santo. There are still 20 cases under investigation and another 17 have been discarded. According to the latest bulletin released by the state government, through the Department of Health (Sesa), the Espírito Santo region has had 256 confirmed cases of the disease
Tanzania: Three-Month Baby, 75 Year Old Man Get Resurfaced Cholera in Zanzibar As Heavy Rains Pound
Zanzibar’s Minister for Health and Social Welfare said there are 23 people reported to be suffering from cholera. Most of those affected by the disease were from districts Urban West A, Urban West B and Urban North A, all in Unguja, while the remainder were from the districts of Micheweni and Wete on Pemba Island
Superbugs: The world is taking action, but low-income countries must not be left behind
The WHO’s Dr Marc Sprenger said that while the world has woken up to the threat of antimicrobial resistance and is starting to respond, many low-income countries are struggling to find capacity and need greater support. Sprenger said that more than 90% of people live in countries which have developed a national action plan on antimicrobial resistance. Around 30% of low-income countries either have or are developing a plan and these are the ones that most urgently need to be best prepared
Tripura: Water-borne diseases affect people more than malaria, over 40,000 people affected
The state of Tripura has recorded over 40,000 people affected by malaria, water-borne diseases and bacillary dysentery between the start of the year and now, although no deaths have been recorded. Water-borne diseases (13,159 patients) turn out to be a bigger villain than bacillary dysentery and malaria, with 1,081 dysentery victims and 703 malaria affected people
Malaria cases in Nagaland on increase, preventive measures to be taken
The National Vector Borne Disease Control Programme said it would carry out DDT spraying as it believes it is one of the most effective measures to prevent the spread of malaria. It went on to say mosquitoes in Nagaland are susceptible to DDT and there is no cheap alternative to this effective chemical which can be used on a large scale
Yemen: Cholera deaths mounting as infections increasing
UNICEF reported that 473 people have died from cholera, while infections rose to 52,000 cases across 18 Yemeni governorates. The numbers jumped by 14,000 in just the last two days. The health conditions are being exacerbated by food shortages, increased malnutrition and a lack of access to adequate health services, due to the Yemeni crisis. The UN Population Fund for the Arab Region said that 1.1m pregnant women who are malnourished, need immediate care and pregnancy health service support are at high risk
World Health Organisation chief Margaret Chan leaves big shoes to fill
The former Hong Kong director of health is retiring as director-general of the World Health Organisation after serving more than 10 years in the role. On the front line she will be remembered for rising to the challenges of severe acute respiratory syndrome and Ebola in particular and the hard lessons learned. But her most valuable legacy, if the world takes up her initiative seriously, may yet turn out to be a global action plan on bacterial resistance to antibiotics, which if not curbed could make common infections life threatening once again
Cholera kills 248 in South Sudan - UN
At least 248 people have died from a cholera outbreak across 19 counties in South Sudan since the initial outbreak was reported in June last year, the UN said. OCHA said that as of May 15th there have been 8,160 cholera cases since that initial case last year. Nine out of the 19 counties affected by the cholera outbreak since last June have reported cholera cases in the last four weeks and are considered to have active transmission of the disease
Health systems
Why Europe is resorting to China for its penicillin supply
Countries hit hard by shortages of penicillin are increasingly turning to Chinese companies as the majority of the factories still producing the drug are based in that country, however, shortages of the drug have been reported in at least 18 countries over the last three years, including Europe and North America, and there are concerns countries are sourcing from companies that do not always adhere to European drug manufacturing standards
Kerala: Blood bank lacks machine to segregate platelets
The NABH accredited Aluva district hospital blood bank is searching for a machine that segregates platelets from blood which prevents wastage of blood. It is more than 3 years since the hospital requested the government provide the apheresis machine, but the long wait is building up demand and patients are running from pillar to post when in need of platelets, said a local health expert
Health ministry takes PHFI off vaccination campaign over foreign funding
In its first action dissociating one of its programmes from the Public Health Foundation of India (PHFI), the Health Ministry has decided to take away its role in the Mission Indradhanush vaccination campaign. The decision has been taken keeping in mind that till its problems with foreign funding are resolved, the PHFI cannot access money from the Bill and Melinda Gates Foundation (BMGF) for the programme, and therefore cannot possibly discharge its role. It is the first sign that the PHFI’s troubles with the government may not end any time soon
Health R&D Still Underfunded – WHO Members Concerned, NGOs Call For More Ambition
NGOs urged that delinkage of the cost of R&D for new medicines and new medicine pricing needs to be on the WHO agenda every time public sector funding of R&D is discussed and when funding reforms are considered by the WHO. There was also calls for the collection and publication of data on R&D investment flow, the cost associated with specific clinical trials and the role of government in funding or subsidising drug development. MSF noted that its work is often hindered because medicines, vaccines and diagnostics are too expensive, too difficult to use or do not exist, so it believes there is a need for a comprehensive reform of the way medical R&D is prioritised, financed and conducted
United States construct referral public health laboratory in Ethiopia
Agencies of the USA government have inaugurated the regional referral of a public health laboratory in Ethiopia. It is the fourth state-of-the-art laboratory constructed by the CDC with funding from the PEPFAR programme. The lab was constructed at a cost of U.S.$3.5m and will serve a population of approximately 5m people in the Tigray region and parts of northern Ethiopia
Gender Minister Wants Women Take Leadership Role in Health System Management
Liberia’s Minister of Gender, Children and Social Protection, Julia Duncan Cassell, says the untapped potential of women in health has undermined the contribution they could make to effective leadership for health systems strengthening globally. Speaking at the International Council of Nurses Program at the 2017 Congress and sharing experience on sustainable healthcare and empowering women under the theme, “Nurses at the Forefront Transforming Care” in Barcelona, Spain, Minister Cassell said women leaders in health require unique competencies to compete with their male counterparts
Unlikely alliance of India and U.S. could keep medicines access on WHO agenda
The issue of access to medicines is rising on the international agenda and developed countries are feeling the bite of prices of new medicines, indeed, the issue is starting to blur as some countries, such as the Netherlands, Greece and Portugal are not putting up with industry prices and saying it loudly and clearly. A committee at the WHA adopted a proposal by India, supported by the USA, that the discussion on access to medicines be an agenda item at the WHO Executive Board in January 2018. A bolder proposal for the issue to become a standing agenda item at the WHA by South Africa was rejected
Trump’s Proposed Budget Cuts Trouble Bioterrorism Experts
One aspect of the nation’s defence under Donald Trump’s proposed budget cuts which would put the US at risk is the slashing of the budgets of government bodies which protect the nation from deadly pathogens, man-made or natural. Agencies tasked with biosecurity would be severely hit: The Office for Public Health Preparedness and Response, which tracks the outbreaks of disease (cut by 9.7%), the National Center for Emerging and Zoonotic Infectious Diseases, a branch that fights threats like anthrax and Ebola (cut by 11%), the CDC’s Center for Global Health (cut by 18%) – experts in biological threats are reacting with alarm
Communicable diseases
Migrant labour, truckers play spoiler in anti-AIDS mission
A large population of migrant workers and truckers are non-receptive to the extensive campaign of promoting safe sex, thus contributing to the high number of HIV-positive cases in Andhra Pradesh. These two groups have been non-receptive to the use of condoms for sex which has in part fuelled the increase in HIV positive cases
Newly Developed Molecule May Lead To First Synthetic One-Dose Antimalarial
A molecule that can become the first fully synthetic and one-dose treatment for malaria has been developed by researchers at LSTM in collaboration with the University of Liverpool. The molecule works against parasites showing the key genetic marker for artemisinin resistance in in vitro studies
Sex workers to remain ‘criminals’, vulnerable to HIV?
The Daily Maverick reports that after almost 20 year of foot-dragging, the government has been advised to continue to criminalise sex work – in the very week when a special clinic for sex workers and drug users designed to tackle the health issues surrounding the industry head on opens in Cape Town. Mathematical modelling and current evidence indicate that if sex work was decriminalised, 33-46% of HIV infections could be averted among female sex workers and clients within a decade, opening the door to more preventative strategies
HIV hidden reservoirs detected with new powerful test, bringing scientists closer to a cure
Scientists have developed a test sensitive enough to identify HIV lurking in a dormant state in the body. It appears to be faster and less invasive that the method used currently to track down `hidden` HIV – and as such represents an important step in the direction of a potential cure. In a study published in Nature Medicine, scientists describe a new test which allowed them to identify the virus hiding in the body, and to assess if the detected virus could start replicating again if patients stopped taking their drugs
Zika may cause eye problems in foetuses
Research shows there may be a link between the Zika virus and a number of neurological disorders including the Guillain-Barre syndrome and microcephaly. It could result in brain damage, disability, weakness, paralysis and could impact long-term memory. It could also lead to depression in some. This new research shows abnormalities in the eyes, which as part of the central nervous system, under develop in the foetus during pregnancy
Authorities who failed to share information about Zika cases have violated medical ethics codes
When a disease of this sort is detected, local authorities must be alerted so they can inform the public about taking the necessary preventative measures. This lack of transparency can have consequences when it comes to public health actions. The detection of Zika should have been widely disseminated to the academic community and to clinical and research facilities. This information helps the states to strengthen and/or set up surveillance and diagnostic systems. This lack of sharing of information is a serious ethical violation of the medical codes of best practice
Let yellow fever vaccination process be transparent
The Ugandan ministry of health said it has started issuing new standardised yellow fever vaccination cards as a measure to avert forgeries. The ministry is offering the first 50,000 certificates for free but after that there may be a cost for the certificates. The paper calls for this certification process to be transparent and credible and the government should educate the public on the process, it should be about eliminating haemorrhagic fever not enriching clinic owners and a few unscrupulous officials
Non communicable diseases
Scientists reveal how sugar fuels various forms of cancer growth
A sugar rich diet may be fuelling various forms of cancer, as new research confirms a long suspected belief, previous studies have suggested that tumours thrive off sugar, using it as energy to mutate and spread across the body, now scientists have shown one type of cancer - which can be found in the lungs, head and neck, oesophagus and cervix - has more of a sweet tooth than others, squamous cell carcinoma (SqCC) is more dependent on sugar to grow, experts at the University of Texas at Dallas discovered
This protein can help ward off chronic heart failure
Japanese researchers have identified a receptor protein on the surface of heart cells that promotes chronic heart failure, affecting more than 20 million people worldwide. The study also suggests that inhibiting this protein called corticotropin could help treat a disease. Lead researcher Mikito Takefuji discovered that a signalling protein called corticotropin releasing hormone receptor 2 (Crhr2) is expressed on the surface of heart muscle cells, or cardiomyocytes and that Crhr2 levels increase in mice suffering from heart failure
Genetic mutations study validate new strategy for reducing cholesterol
According to a recent study, an injectable antibody can be really helpful for lowering blood lipids and thereby potentially preventing coronary artery disease and other conditions caused by the build-up of fats, cholesterol. This new study targets a protein called ANGPTL3, a regulator of enzymes that clears triglycerides and other fat molecules from the blood. The scientists studied ANGPTL3 in both humans and mice. They found that blocking ANGPTL3 activity with an investigative injectable antibody, known as evinacumab, reduced triglycerides by up to 76 percent and lowered LDL cholesterol 23 percent in human study participants and largely reversed signs of atherosclerosis in mouse models
Unique gene that staves off heart disease identified
Scientists have identified a unique gene variant in people living in isolated Greek villages that protects them from heart diseases despite enjoying a high-fat diet. The variant, rs145556679*, is associated with lower levels of both ‘bad’ natural fats and ‘bad’ cholesterol, the factors that lower the risk of cardiovascular disease, said researchers from Wellcome Trust Sanger Institute in the UK. The cardioprotective variant was found in Mylopotamos, northern Crete where the population is isolated and live a long life despite having a diet rich in animal fat
New designer viruses can help fight cancer: Study
Researchers at the University of Basel claim they have come up with artificial designer viruses that can work in tandem with the immune system to kill specific cancer cells. The engineered viruses alert the immune system and cause it to send killer cells to combat the tumour. The virologists infused certain proteins into the virus that are otherwise found only in cancer cells. Infection with the designer virus enabled the immune system to recognise these cancer proteins as threatening
The trauma of a breast cancer diagnosis can have cognitive effects
The mental fog often experienced by breast cancer patients after chemotherapy might be due more to post-traumatic stress than to cancer drugs, a new study suggests. The study finds that similar symptoms have been reported by breast cancer patients who have not started their chemotherapy yet and even by those whose treatment did not include chemotherapy. The study concluded that PTSD symptoms, not the treatment, were the principal cause
Young People Could Still Get Cardiovascular Disease From Obesity
A new study shows that a bad case of cardiovascular health disease caused by obesity is more likely to happen to people as young as 17 years old. Prior to this study, there had been a limited investigation of the effects of having a high body mass index (BMI) in young people. According to this study published in Alpha Galileo, the European Society of Human Genetics investigated a potential link between increased BMI and cardiovascular health. In the annual conference at which this paper was presented, the researchers hypothesized that cardiovascular risks due to obesity were likely to register at an earlier stage of life
Gene-editing technique scientists hope will cure cancer and all inherited disease found to have dangerous flaw
Researchers writing in the journal Nature Methods described how they had used Crispr-Cas9 to restore sight to blind mice. However, when they sequenced the entire genome of the animals, they found two had more than 1,500 small mutations and more than 100 larger deletions and insertions of genetic material. The researchers said they hope the findings will encourage others to use whole-genome sequencing as a method to determine all the off-target effects of Crispr techniques and study different versions for the safest, most accurate form of editing
Promoting health through the life course
In drought-stricken Mali, women manoeuvre for land - and a future
Malian men control access to land and decide which parts women are allowed to farm - that`s a problem for women as erratic weather increases competition for land and harvests. In some cases, crop losses on their own land have led men to encroach on land traditionally farmed by women and even steal women`s crops, according to development workers in the area. But an experiment in securing women`s access to small plots of land - and training them to grow crops in difficult climate conditions - aims to change that
Dar rivers in danger of drying up
Human and industrial activities around Mzinga and Kizinga streams as well as Mpiji and Msimbazi rivers have polluted them. People living around the areas have turned the streams and rivers into dumpsites and disturbed alignments and natural water. The rivers are being polluted by the concentration of high organic and nutrient, low dissolved oxygen, and high counts of indicator organisms from home and industrial activities, environmental experts told the press
‘Scheme for empowering girls is in doldrums’
Awareness about the Rajiv Gandhi Scheme for Empowerment of Adolescent Girls (RGSEAG)-SABLA is poor in the State, claim child rights experts. The SABLA scheme was implemented in 2010 across 205 districts in the country. The scheme aims at empowering adolescent girls between 11 and 18 years of age by improving their nutrition and health and teaching them life skills. It also focusses on educating them on their legal rights, reproductive cycle, HIV/AIDS, contraception, menstrual hygiene, marriage, pregnancy and child care
‘Baby boxes’ help new moms stick to safer sleep practices
Providing new mothers with a “baby box” - a cardboard bassinet with a mattress and fitted cotton sheet - reduces the likelihood that they’ll adopt the unsafe habit of sharing a bed with their new born, new research shows. A previous survey of 1,200 new moms, conducted by Dr. Megan Heere of Temple University Hospital in Philadelphia and colleagues, found that mothers who received sleep education in the hospital were less likely to bed share, but those who did not have a place for their baby to sleep were at increased risk
Creating awareness on adolescent health through street plays
Adolescent Clubs performed street plays in Peren district and Kohima to create awareness on adolescent health and Non Communicable Diseases on May 27. The programmes were organized by District Health Society. They focused on teenage pregnancy and early marriage – Adolescent Reproductive & Sexual Health (ARSH) and Non Communicable Diseases (NCD) – prevention and control of cancer, hypertension, diabetes and cardiovascular diseases
Millions of Yemenis suffer from lack of food during Ramadan
Nearly 17 million people are facing hunger in war-torn Yemen as Muslims around the world observe the holy month of Ramadan. At the same time, more than two million children suffer from malnutrition in the country, and a child under the age of five dies every 10 minutes of preventable diseases, a UNICEF report said. Additionally, the country is facing a cholera outbreak with more than 29,000 people infected, according to the World Health Organization
First woman to lead Indonesia`s indigenous peoples alliance
Thomson Reuters Foundation news spoke to Rukka Sombolinggi, 44, of the Torajan tribe from the highlands of Sulawesi island, who this week became the first woman at the helm of the Indigenous Peoples Alliance of the Archipelago (AMAN). She discussed how indigenous women in Indonesia are taking the lead in the fight to protect their land and communities as a rise in conflicts threatens tribes living on lands coveted by extractive and logging companies
Stinking mess: Public toilet pollutes Bhavani river
Bhavani River, which was recently found to be contaminated with high amounts of faecal matter, has a new source of pollution - a municipality-run public toilet located near the bridge on Ooty Main Road at Odanthurai - a report from the Tamil Nadu Water Supply and Drainage Board in February found the river water highly contaminated with faecal matter. M Jaikumar, joint secretary of Save Bhavani Trust said the toilet was constructed two years ago, "It was not in use for several months but we found it open again recently so we are trying really hard to educate people and ensure that river contamination is reduced. However, if the government itself indulges in such activities, it becomes really difficult to protect the river," he said
Sri Lanka races to rescue flood victims as toll rises
Helicopters are searching for people marooned four days after the worst floods and mudslides to hit Sri Lanka in 14 years overcame parts of the country`s southwest, killing at least 164 people. With more rain expected, rescuers were racing to evacuate villagers from the most vulnerable areas as emergency teams rushed to distribute aid to nearly half a million people driven from their homes by the island`s worst flooding in a decade. Some 104 people were still listed as missing, the country`s Disaster Management Centre said while another 88 remained in hospital
Tedros Adhanom Receives Warm Welcome Back Home
The Director General-elect of the World Health Organization, Dr Tedros Adhanom, received a warm welcome at Addis Ababa Bole International Airport. Among those who received him include Hirut Zemene, Foreign Affairs State Minister, according to FBC. Ambassadors and delegates from Ethiopian public diplomacy team, including Minister of Health, Prof. Yifru Berhan, Ethiopian Airlines Group CEO, Tewolde Gebremariam joined the welcoming ceremony
World Health Assembly Elects Tedros Adhanom Ghebreyesus as New WHO Director
The newly elected head of the United Nations World Health Organization (WHO),Tedros Adhanom Ghebreyesus, outlined his priorities for journalists at the agency’s headquarters today in Geneva, where he stressed the need for Member States to provide healthcare for all and to implement global health regulations.
WHO’s Identity Crisis
Given that President Trump is proposing funding caps on a whole host of UN agencies, the recent travel expenses at WHO report could not have come at a worse time for the agency, which is facing a severe funding shortfall. Dr Tedros will need to move swiftly to bring transparency and accountability to the WHO to demonstrate that every dollar is well spent. The world desperately needs a fully functioning WHO and must hope that in Dr Tedros the organization has found the leadership it needs to overcome its current woes