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Section analysis

Non communicable diseases

Diabetes still on the rise, but the rate of heart disease in adult diabetics is falling

Despite the worrying increase in the number of adults and children with diabetes around the world, the rate of cardiovascular disease among those with type 2 diabetes (90% of cases) has decreased by 20%, according to a Swedish study published in the New England Journal of Medicine

April 13, 2017
Yahoo Lifestyle

Millions of Americans risk hearing loss from jobs and guns

Many people are exposed to dangerously loud sounds at work and play, and most don’t take action by wearing ear plugs or take other steps to prevent hearing loss, a new U.S. study suggests. Untreated hearing loss is associated with increased stress, depression and social withdrawal, and may exacerbate problems for those with cognitive changes such as dementia, the study authors suggested, urging people at work to make use of protection against loud noise at work or from guns as a hobby

April 13, 2017
Reuters

NCDs : An emerging health crisis

Ariz Rizvi, President of Apollo Life and a recipient of the Emerging Healthcare Leader of the Year 2016-17, writes an opinion column for the Economic Times in which he discusses why non-communicable diseases in India and around the world are a growing health crisis

April 14, 2017
Economic Times

Fast CRISPR test easily detects Zika and antibiotic resistance

The system that sparked a revolution in gene editing can also be used in fast and cheap tests for pathogens. A tool based on CRISPR has been shown to detect the Zika virus in blood, urine and saliva, but could also be used for understanding cancer. It was developed by researchers at the Broad Institute in Massachusetts, who call it SHERLOCK – for Specific High Sensitivity Enzymatic Reporter Unlocking. The team say the system can detect single molecules of genetic material among mixed samples and can distinguish between genetic sequences that differ by only one letter

April 13, 2017
New Scientist, Eureka Alert
April 14, 2017
Business Standard
April 13, 2017
Phys.Org, Washington Post

Hospitalizations drop where laws restrict trans fats

Statistics show that people were less likely to go the hospital with heart attacks or strokes after several counties in New York State restricted the use of trans fats, according to a new study. These new laws came in in July 2007 in many instances and research has not, until now, measured possible outcomes

April 12, 2017
Reuters

More evidence ties insulin resistance to cognitive decline

Having a reduced sensitivity to insulin may lead to a more rapid decline in memory or other mental skills in old age, even among people who don’t have diabetes, a recent study suggests. Out of a pool of 489 older adults followed for more than two decades, the researchers found the people who have the highest levels of insulin resistance had the worst cognitive performance and the lowest scores on tests of memory and a mental skill known as executive function

April 12, 2017
Reuters

Is liver disease the next major lifestyle disease of India after diabetes and blood pressure?

Commonly caused by Hepatitis B and C, the most common causes of liver disease can now be called alcohol and other obesity related disorders. There has also been a paradigm shift in the dynamics of liver cirrhosis with about hundreds of thousands of new patients diagnosed with it in India every year

April 11, 2017
Times of India

Mystery clot reveals a helpful mutant gene in a hunt for a cure

A discovery in Italy of the case of a man who had a tiny change in his DNA that intensified the power of a protein called IX. In this man, this ‘super factor IX’ caused his blood to clot too easily. But for an estimated 26,000 people in the world with haemophilia B, a lack of the protein leaves them vulnerable to extreme bleeding where minor injuries become life threatening. Spark Therapeutics and its partner Pfizer released data showing that in 10 haemophilia B patients receiving the gene treatment, the average annual number of bleeds fell by 96%, to less than one a year. Since entering the trial the patients have not has to get infusions of the protein and they are planning to move the therapy into final stage trials    

April 11, 2017
Bloomberg

Inconsistent healthcare across India with gaps due to stigma and service holes

According to the National Mental Health Survey, conducted by NIMHANS Bangalore, it was reported that despite three out of four people experiencing severe mental disorders, there are huge gaps in treatment. This has been reported due to the stigma associated with mental disorders and nearly 80% of those with mental disorders had not received any treatment despite being ill for over 12 months

April 11, 2017
Daily O

Risk factors for heart disease and stroke also tied to Alzheimer’s

Middle-aged people with risk factors for heart attacks and stroke are also more likely to develop changes in the brain that can lead to Alzheimer’s disease, a new study suggests

April 11, 2017
Reuters

Heart attacks, suicides kill more CRPF than Naxal operations

Heart attacks, depression and suicides have killed more CRPF troops, over 24 times more, than have operations and ambushes in Naxal violence hit areas over the last two years. Five CRPF men were killed in 2015, 31 in 2016 and thirteen so far this year in the three left-wing extremist affected states of Chhattisgarh, Bihar and Jharkhand

April 12, 2017
Business Standard

Apple hires secret team for treating diabetes: CNBC

Apple has hired a team of biomedical engineers as part of a secret initiative, initially envisaged by late Apple co-founder Steve Jobs, to develop sensors to treat diabetes, CNBC reported, citing three people familiar with the matter. The news comes as the line between pharmaceuticals and technology is blurring as companies join forces to tackle chronic diseases using high-tech devices, jump starting a novel form of medicine called bioelectronics

April 12, 2017
Reuters, CNBC
April 17, 2017
India Times

The rise of non-communicable diseases in Hong Kong amid climate change

MIMS explains the influence of climate change on non-communicable diseases in Hong Kong. An average increase in daily mean temperature above 28.2 degrees C was associated with an estimated 1.8% increase in mortality. In Hong Kong, during the summer, temperatures break these levels and hospitalisations and deaths tend to be due to cardiovascular and respiratory diseases. Higher temperatures still would increase atmospheric concentrations of particulate matter and production of ozone, which would acerbate the chronic pulmonary diseases and acute respiratory diseases, as well as those linked to lung function  

April 14, 2017
MIMS

Delhi's Love For Booze Has Brought The City To The Brink Of A Heart Disease Epidemic

A unique set of data generated by Indian researchers has confirmed a trend doctors have been worried about for some time, Delhi is heading towards an epidemic of cardiovascular diseases, chiefly heart attack and stroke cases, due to a prevalence of alcohol use, obesity and raised blood pressure – all illnesses which have grown in number over the course of the last twenty years

April 18, 2017
India Times

Trans fat bans link to fewer heart attacks, deaths—and they’re going national

Three years after banning trans fats from eateries in some New York counties they have seen a 6.2% reduction in heart attacks and strokes compared with those that didn’t, researchers report in JAMA Cardiology. Another set of researchers reported last year in Journal of Health Economics that the ban appeared to have cut deaths from cardiovascular disease by 4.5%, sparing 13 lives from cardiovascular death per 100,000 people each year  

April 18, 2017
Ars Technica

On your bike: Cycling to work linked with large health benefits

People who cycle to work have a substantially lower risk of developing cancer or heart disease or dying prematurely, and governments should do all they can to encourage more active commuting, scientists said. In a study in the British Medical Journal researchers said there was a 45% lower risk of developing cancer and a 46% lower risk of heart disease compared to non-active commuters

April 19, 2017
Reuters

Alphabet's Verily unit launches study to track health data

Verily, Alphabet’s life science business, said it was launching a four year study with about 10,000 participants to understand how people transition from being healthy to becoming sick and to identify additional risk factors for diseases. The study will collect data as well as biological samples such as blood and saliva. The outcome of the study may inspire a new generation of tools geared towards disease prevention versus simply diagnosis and treatment  

April 19, 2017
Reuters
April 19, 2016
Fortune
April 19, 2017
Bloomberg

Study finds body's zinc supply affects heart health

Researchers in Germany have identified a link between the level of zinc in the body and the risk of cardiovascular issues related to oxidative stress. Researchers found that the concentration of glutathione and vitamin E in the heart muscle declines with the level of zinc affecting the heart’s ability to handle oxidative stress

April 18, 2017
UPI

Prince William warns 'stiff upper lip' can damage mental health

Prince William has warned that British men who ‘keep a stiff upper lip’ are bottling up their emotions and this is detrimental to mental health. The two princes, and William’s wife Kate, are spearheading a campaign called Heads Together which encourages people to open up about mental illness and seek help

April 18, 2017
Reuters

People's review calls for independent inquiry into 'overwhelmed' mental health system

A review into mental healthcare in New Zealand has found that the system is at such a breaking point that a full-scale independent inquiry is needed

April 16, 2017
TV New Zealand

Over 1,800 amputations done between 2014-2016

The Fiji deputy secretary for Hospital Services, Dr Luisa Cikamatana said Fiji has an urgent need to make healthy lifestyle changes now with the ever increasing rate of non-communicable diseases in the country. She revealed that 1,869 amputations have been carried out between 2014 and 2016, of which 835 were females and 1,034 males who had lower limb amputations. She said she is seeing a growth in four major types of NCD: cardiovascular disease, cancers, chronic respiratory disease and diabetes

April 15, 2017
Fiji Village
April 18, 2017
Fiji Village

Mentally ill accessing less U.S. health care

More than 8 million American adults suffer from serious psychological distress and they are less likely to access healthcare services than other people, a new U.S. study says

April 17, 2017
Reuters

Britain's Prince Harry sought counseling more than a decade after mother's death

Britain’s Prince Harry sought counselling in his late twenties to help deal with the grief of losing his mother more than a decade earlier, he told the Telegraph newspaper. Harry revealed he had come close to a complete breakdown on several occasions after shutting down his emotions, impacting both his work and his personal life

April 17, 2017
Reuters

South India's scorching drought forces farmers into debt bondage

One of the worst droughts in decades across south India is forcing tens of thousands of farmers and labourers to take out loans to survive, pushing them into debt bondage and increasing the risk that they may be exploited, activists warn. Then there follows on from this that there is a chance of not managing to cope, leading to a higher risk of suicide

April 18, 2017
Trust.org

Obesity contributes to health problems in Zambia

Radio France International reports on how Zambian health authorities have found that increased obesity in parts of the country is contributing to a sharp rise in non-communicable disease problems which are harming people’s

April 10, 2017
Radio France International

Lack of sunlight could increase the risk of heart disease in obese children, study claims

A study of medical records of children aged six to 17 found many who were overweight and had high cholesterol and fatty acids and also suffered from low vitamin D. The researchers suggested that children with weight problems should spend more time out in the sun which stimulates the body to produce Vitamin D naturally

April 10, 2017
Irish Sun

We can no longer afford to ignore India’s mental health crisis

In 1990 suicide in India was not among the top killers of Indians, now it is. Some 20% of the Indian population will suffer some form of mental illness in the next few years yet only 10% of them will receive treatment. By 2030, mental illness will reduce economic growth in India and China by $11 trillion, it needs addressing

April 5, 2017
The Quint

Parkinson’s said to be a major neuro-degenerative disorder in Pakistan

Parkinson’s disease has emerged as a major neuro-degenerative disorder in Pakistan with around 80-100 people diagnosed with the condition on a regular basis, senior neurologists told a medical conference. Experts warned that the number of people afflicted with Parkinson’s disease and associated movement disorders may rise as high as 120,000 by 2030

April 4, 2017
Pakistan Today, Geo TV

Stop calling NCDs ‘lifestyle diseases’ - SPC

Director General of the SPC, Colin Tukuitonga, said calling NCDs ‘lifestyle diseases’ was wrong because it implied people had a choice when, in fact, many Pacific people and especially children were victims of their circumstances. ‘It is actually quite expensive having a healthy diet and to say it is individual responsibility is unfortunate as there are systemic issues which come into play. The environment in which people live and work will have a bearing’

April 5, 2017
Radio New Zealand

Long-term antibiotic use in early to mid-life puts you at cancer risk

A study suggest that long-term antibiotic use in early to mid-life may be linked to a heightened risk of abnormal growths in the colon and rectum, known as polyps or colorectal adenomas, which precede the development of most bowel cancers, the research revealed. The findings also added to emerging evidence that the type and diversity of bacteria in the gut may have a key role in the development of cancer

April 5, 2017
DNA India, BBC News

Body mass may not be a good way to predict heart disease in minorities

In this new study, a higher proportion of healthy weight people in non-white racial and ethnic groups also had heart or diabetes risk factors. But, whereas it stood at 21% for normal weight individuals from a white ethnic origin, it rose to 31% for black people, 32% for Chinese descent, 39% for Hispanics and 44% for South Asians

April 4, 2017
Reuters
April 3, 2017
Science Daily

One in three 'inactive' Britons at risk of heart disease, says heart charity

Almost one in three people in the UK are at risk of heart disease because of physical inactivity, according to a new study by the British Heart Foundation

April 3, 2017
Sky News, The Times, ITV

Experts urge huge expansion of online therapy for mental illness

A massive and growing mental health burden across the world can only be tackled successfully with a major expansion of online psychiatric resources such as virtual clinics and web-based psychotherapies, specialists said. With resources tight and the global mental health system only serving about 10% of patients even now, the web is the only option for significant extra treatment capacity 

April 3, 2017
Reuters

Heart attacks diagnosed quicker by new blood test

Scientists have developed a new blood test that is more sensitive in detecting damaged heart muscles caused by a heart attack. In a paper published today they investigated how many heart muscle cells needed to die before they could be detected in the blood stream

April 4, 2017
Eureka Alert
April 5, 2017
Mirror

Scientists find common antibiotic could prevent or treat PTSD

A common antibiotic called doxycycline can disrupt the formation of negative thoughts and fears in the brain and may prove useful in treating or preventing post-traumatic stress disorder (PTSD), according to research by British and Swiss scientists. The antibiotic works because it blocks certain proteins outside nerve cells, called matrix enzymes, which our brains need to form memories 

April 4, 2017
Reuters
April 5, 2017
Business Standard

Global smoking deaths up by 5% since 1990 - study

The percentage of men and women who use tobacco every day has dropped in most nations since 1990, but the total number of smokers and tobacco-related deaths has increased, a consortium of researchers reported. Mortality could rise even higher as tobacco companies aggressively target new markets, particularly in the developing world they warned in a report published in The Lancet

April 5, 2017
Yahoo News Singapore, The Guardian
April 6, 2017
Indian Express

Depression highest among those with chronic diseases

Kenyans who have chronic illnesses such as diabetes, HIV, cancer and arthritis are two times more likely to also suffer from depression than those without those diseases. If undetected this aggravates the sickness. It also generates increased economic costs to society in terms of lost productivity and increased cost of seeking treatment. Poor mental health is also associated with rapid social change and human rights abuse

April 8, 2017
Nation

When gluten is the villain, could a common virus be the trigger?

A new study raises a novel idea as to what might trigger celiac disease, it suggests that a common virus may be to blame. Researchers believe a viral infection can serve to trigger celiac. They exposed mice to reovirus and at the same time fed gluten to the mice. Their hunch was right. The mice developed an immunological response against gluten that mimics the features of humans with celiac disease

April 8, 2017
NPR, iflscience
April 6, 2017
New Scientist

73% of Malaysian die of hypertension, diabetes, heart disese: MOH

The Malaysian Ministry of Health estimates that 73% of deaths are caused by non-communicable diseases. MOH Disease Control Deputy Director, Dr Omah Mihat, said hypertension, diabetes and heart problems are the main killers

April 8, 2017
Malaysian News
April 6, 2017
astroawani.com

Act before workers break down

Common factors behind workplace-related depression include stress and burnout, including poor work organization, excessive workloads, job insecurity, sexual harassment and lack of support from higher management 

April 9, 2017
The Star Malaysia

Obesity and diabetes kill more than intially thought, according to new study

Forbes says that a recently published study in PLoS ONE revealed that diabetes may be killing around four times as many people as originally thought

April 8, 2017
Forbes

Scandinavia's Sami struggle with suicide, worsened by climate change

Scandinavia’s Sami, an arctic indigenous population, are struggling with high suicide rates but the impact of global warming is worsening the problem. The traditional way of life herding reindeer is under pressure as rising temperatures threaten the size of the herds and cause financial woes

April 7, 2017
Reuters

FDA allows 23andMe to sell genetic tests for 10 diseases

The U.S. FDA agreed to allow genetic testing company 23andMe to market tests directly to consumers to assess their predisposition to develop 10 diseases, including Parkinson’s, Alzheimers’s and Celiac Disease

April 6, 2017
Reuters

NCDs account for 23% of Africa’s disease burden

A report published by the African Academy of Sciences and the Stellenbosch Institute for Advanced Study states that investing time and money on stem cell research to address NCDs, which have huge economic burden on Africa, is essential to ensure socioeconomic development of the continent. The report says that NCDs account for 23% of the disease burden on the continent, contributing to a rise in medical costs and a negative impact on human growth

April 5, 2017
SciDev.net

Low ammonium levels in urine may indicate serious risks for kidney disease patients

New research indicates that measuring ammonium excretion in the urine may be a help in identifying patients with chronic kidney disease who face serious health risks

April 6, 2017
Eureka Alert
April 7, 2017
ProKerala, DNA India

Will my medical expenses get paid if I become suicidal?

The African press looks at the state of medical insurance with regard to mental health services and reveals that expenses for treatment run out swiftly and many are put off by the mounting costs, leading to many in acute need of support being at extra risk of self-harm or suicide

April 20, 2017
Bhekisisa.org, AllAfrica.com

Many eye care providers may not catch macular degeneration

A new study suggests primary care optometrists and opthalmologists may sometimes fail to detect age-related macular degeneration, the most common cause of vision impairment in the elderly. Researchers examined data on 1,288 eyes from 644 older adults two had a diluted eye exam. Based on these exams none of the participants were diagnosed with macular degeneration by primary care specialists. After retina specialists took another look, they diagnosed eye disorder in 25% of the cases

May 5, 2017
Reuters

Suicide - Why '13 Reasons Why' is dangerous

The latest Netflix hit, ’13 Reasons Why’ deals with fictional teenage Hannah Baker’s death by suicide. The narrative is a noble one, but simplistic, ‘be nice to others as you don’t know what they are dealing with.’ Evidence based organizations, with a firm grasp of suicide prevention issues, strongly discourage graphic depictions, or discussions of suicide, because the risk of additional suicides increases when a story describes method, or uses dramatic or graphic headlines or images, or glamourizes the issue in any way

May 4, 2017
CNN

Smoking weakens a gene that protects arteries: study

New research points to a genetic explanation for how smoking can lead to a plaque build-up that stiffens arteries and causes heart disease, a report in the journal Circulation said. This is one of the first big steps towards solving the complex puzzle of gene-environment interactions that lead to coronary heart disease

May 3, 2017
The Hindu
May 2, 2017
Science Daily

GSK 'real world' drug test has second success in asthma

The success of the 4,233 patient trial, which tested Breo in day-to-day practice across Salford in northern England, followed on the back of a similar ‘win’ for the medicine in chronic obstructive pulmonary disease trials a year ago. Unlike a randomised controlled trial of the type typically used to win initial drug approval, the real world studies aim to mimic the way medicines are actually used by patients when they are not being closely monitored by researchers

May 5, 2017
Reuters

Good heart health extends the ‘golden years’

Better heart care during young adulthood and middle age means people end up living longer and spending fewer years in later life with any kind of chronic disease, according to new research. This prolonged good health also saves money on health care and reduces health care spending, the research team said, pointing to helping people better understand the development of risk factors and the linkage to disease earlier in life

May 5, 2017
Reuters

High-salt diet putting teens at risk of heart disease later in life

A study presented to the 2017 Paediatric Academic Societies Meeting in San Francisco concluded that consuming too much salt is having a negative effect on teenagers’ health and could possibly lead to cardiovascular disease in adulthood. Too much salt increases arterial stiffness in younger people who have high risk factors such as obesity, diabetes, hypertension and high cholesterol

May 8, 2017
CTV News

India Is Facing a Mental Health Crisis – and Its Education System Is Ill Equipped to Handle It...

The Wire discusses the taboo surrounding mental health problems and the unwillingness of most Indian colleges to take up the costs of professional counselling in order to protect India’s highly vulnerable youth

May 7, 2017
The Wire

Main Causes of Mortality in Tehran

A new study by the Tehran University of Medical Sciences, drew up a list of the 10 leading causes of death in Tehran and two of its major counties. According to the study, which examined all causes of death under the age of 70 last winter, heart attacks, diabetes and strokes were the top three causes of mortality in Tehran, Rey and Eslamshahr. It went on to add that across the country, 95,000 people lose their lives prematurely each year through cardiovascular disease, 35,000 are under the age of 55, although many cases could be prevented though measures such as healthier lifestyle, timely check-ups and physical exercise

May 3, 2017
Financial Tribune

Obesity, overweight rising among Nigerian children — STUDY

A new report entitled “The 2016 Nigerian Report Card on Physical Activity for Children and Youth” has revealed a prevalence of overweight and obesity among Nigerian children. According to the report, schools are not complying with stipulated physical activity requirements and there was no change from the 2013 obesity figures

May 2, 2017
Nigeria Today

Alarm over West Australians’ high blood pressure

Almost one-third of WA adults have high blood pressure, but about half are not having it treated, experts warned. University of WA chairman of cardiology and heart foundation member, Carl Schultz, said many people were ticking time bombs waiting for heart attacks, strokes and kidney disease because they had unmanaged hypertension

May 2, 2017
West Australian

Fears over statins and their reported side-effects are causing thousands to die needlessly from ...

Thousands of British people are needlessly dying from heart attacks and strokes after being scared away from statins by warnings of non-existent side effects, experts have warned. Professor Peter Sever accused UK drug regulators after an investigation demonstrated that aching muscles and other reported symptoms could not be blamed on the cholesterol lowering drugs

May 2, 2017
Mirror

NZers not taking asthma seriously enough, experts warn

15% of children and 11% of adults have asthma. It causes 1.6 deaths and 163 hospitalisations per 100,000 people, with far higher rates among Maori and Pacific communities. A recent report indicated the disease was prevalent for children in the Whanganui, Tairawhiti and Northland District Board areas and for adults in Wairapa, Hutt Valley and Mid Central districts

May 2, 2017
Radio New Zealand

Excess smartphone use bad for mental health: Study

Excess use of smartphone and other devices may lead to attention, behaviour and self-regulation problems for adolescents already at risk of mental health issues, a new study warns. Researchers from Duke University followed 151 young adolescents and their daily use of digital technology. The participants were surveyed three times a day for a month were assessed for mental health symptoms 18 months later. Researchers noted adolescents who were already at risk of mental health issues, regardless of digital devices, saw these devices add to their problems

May 3, 2017
Times of India

New Chief Executive aims to reduce Māori hospitalisation rates

A new report showed the incidence of asthma among Maori and Pacific peoples is among the highest in New Zealand with more than one of five (21%) Maori and one in six (17%) Pacific Islander children requiring medication for the condition. The newly appointed CEO of the Asthma and Respiratory Foundation New Zealand said one of her main focuses will be on reducing Maori hospitalisation rates for asthma

May 8, 2017
Maori Television

Experimental drug reduces thyroid-associated ‘Graves' eyes’

The experimental orphan drug teprotumumab significantly reduces the eye bulging associated with Graves’ disease, according to the results of a small trial. Among the participants with moderate-to-severe disease who were given intravenous infusions of either teprotumumab or a dummy drug every three weeks for eight treatments, 43% who had the real drug saw a reduction of at least 2 millimetres in eye protrusion by the sixth week compared to 4% in the placebo group. The marked reduction in bulging is similar to that reported after decompression surgery

May 9, 2017
Reuters

'Macho' players need help fighting mental health issues: Gascoigne

Former England footballer Paul Gascoigne, who has spent several spells in rehab battling alcohol and drug addiction, called for more help for players dealing with stress-related issues. He said soccer’s macho culture often deterred players who are constantly in the public limelight from seeking help. “You look at the Everton player who has just been sectioned and realise there are lots of people who have got everything but inside they don’t share enough”

May 9, 2017
Reuters

Se han duplicado las cifras de depresion en Mexico

Mexico saw the number of people suffering from depression or trying to commit suicide jump from 2.2 cases per 100,000 people to 4.7 cases between the years 1990 and 2012, according to WHO statistics. The group of people most at risk were young people between the ages of 15 and 29. Many were women of reproductive age and another major group were older adults. The way society looks at depression is partly to blame, asking sufferers to snap out of it, or make a bigger effort, instead of helping them to overcome the situation with treatment and advice

May 9, 2017
Sipse

Designed by patients: the mental health centre saving the NHS £300,000 a year

Welsh charity Hafal runs a mental health centre in Wales called the Gellinudd Recovery Centre where patients, their families and all stakeholders involved have a say in everything from policy to the décor. The Guardian asks its readers whether co-produced innovations such as this offer a brighter future for mental health care

May 10, 2017
Guardian

Roche's star cancer drug stumbles in study, raising doubts about future

Roche’s Tecentriq immune-oncology drug failed a late-stage follow-up trial against advanced bladder cancer, the Swiss drug maker said, raising questions about whether regulators could scale back their approval of the medicine. U.S. fast-track approval for Tecentriq against bladder cancer had been agreed but subject to success at these further trials

May 10, 2017
Reuters

Too little focus on lifestyle, preventing symptoms in peripheral artery disease

A study shows that many patients with peripheral artery disease, a common cause of chronic disability and mobility restrictions in the elderly, aren’t counselled on lifestyle changes and medications that can help prevent symptoms from worsening. Researchers examined data from 2005 to 2012 in a nationally representative sample of 1,982 patients with PAD and found consistently low use of recommended medications and lifestyle counselling to relieve syptoms and prevent complications like infections, open sores, strokes and heart attacks

May 10, 2017
Reuters

ADHD treatment tied to lower car crash risk

People with ADHD are already at increased risk of motor vehicle accidents, but it its significantly reduced when they are taking ADHD medication, a 10-year study finds. Researchers estimate that one in five of the vehicle accidents among more than 2 million people with ADHD during the study period could have been avoided if these individuals had been receiving medication the entire time

May 10, 2017
Reuters

Greater total pollution exposure tied to higher cancer risk

Living in areas with higher total exposures to harmful pollutants in the air, water and land is associated with greater odds of developing cancer, a U.S. study suggests. Researchers examined incidences for cancers in each country across the U.S. and found an average of 451 cases per 100,000 people. Counties with a higher environmental quality ranking the lowest saw an average of 39 cancer cases each year per 100,000 residents

May 8, 2017
Reuters

400,000 Vietnamese die from non-communicable diseases every year

Some 400,000 Vietnamese people die from non-communicable diseases such as diabetes, high blood pressure and cancer every year, health officials told the media. Of the annual fatalities, up to 70% are due to non-communicable diseases and of the NCDS, up to 40% of the patients die before the age of 70. Many locals are not aware of preventing the diseases, with 49% of men smoking and 77% of the whole population drinking. Smoking related diseases in Vietnam are estimated to cause losses of U.S.$1bn per year

May 8, 2017
xinhuanet, Vietnam Plus, Plenglish

Nearly half of female prisoners have attempted suicide, figures reveal

Figures released by the Prison Reform Trust reveal that 46% of women in prison have tried to take their own lives at some point, compared with six per cent of the general population. It comes after warnings in March that the alarming rise in suicides among female prisoners was linked to inadequate mental health provision and a lack of urgency among prison staff in responding to indications of mental illnesses

May 8, 2017
Independent

Diabetes y bajas defensas podrían provocar tuberculosis

Health expert Juan Jose Atilano Garcia said that people with diabetes and deficiencies to their immune systems are more likely to develop tuberculosis. People who are already carriers of the bacterium see typical symptoms such as cough, fever, loss of weight and malnutrition

May 8, 2017
Huffington Post, Informador

'Silent killer' affects 13 million Thais

At least 13m Thais have suffered from hypertension for years with many not realising they had the condition, Thai health experts said. Hypertension contributes to a four times higher risk of brain blood vessel diseases and twice the risk of heart muscle paralysis, according to information released by the World Health Organization

May 8, 2017
Bangkok Post

Studies show socioeconomic and racial disparities in lupus

Researchers have identified a link between socioeconomic and racial disparities in the severity and treatment of lupus. The studies showed a link between poverty and worse lupus disease associated medical complications, and an increased frequency of adverse pregnancy outcomes in African American and Hispanic patients with lupus compared to white lupus patients

May 8, 2017
UPI

Branded mad for life, Kerala's mentally ill are being abandoned at institutions by families

The stigma surrounding mental health still persists in India and it can be seen in examples at mental health care institutions in Kerala, where inmates cannot leave even after their treatments are complete in many instances, because their families are unwilling to accept them back, leading to unwelcome overcrowding in these facilities

May 2, 2017
The News Minute

Risk factors for heart disease may also predict Alzheimer's

New U.S. research has found that the main risk factors for heart disease – smoking and high cholesterol – may well predict your risk of contracting Alzheimer’s disease later in life. A study of 322 men and women observed that patients affected by at least one of these factors had a higher chance of developing brain plaques

May 1, 2017
abc.net.au

If we want to improve mental health, first we need to tackle poverty

The Guardian welcomes Prince Harry’s recent intervention on the topic of mental health but adds that removing the stigma attached to the illness is not enough and society needs to look at the role of poverty. In the UK the Mental health Foundation say that the poorest fifth of the population are twice as likely to be at risk of mental health problems as those on average incomes, in fact, poverty increases the likelihood of developing mental illness and mental illness increases the likelihood of poverty

April 25, 2017
The Guardian

‘8 million Nigerians risk death from smoking’

About 8m Nigerians are estimated to be at risk of dying from smoking by 2030, the Civil Society Legislative Advocacy Centre (CISLAC) warned. Citing WHO statistics and the Nigerian Global Adult Tobacco Survey, they lamented the poor enforcement of the existing Tobacco Control Act 2015 and expressed fear over the growing number of young people taking to smoking  

April 24, 2017
Nigerian Tribune

Natural deaths in SA linked to unhealthy lifestyles

With around 10,000 new cases of diabetes diagnosed in South Africa each month clinics are being overwhelmed with cases that are often not easy to manage by the time it has been diagnosed, usually at a fairly late stage. With the financial market downgrading the rand to junk status, there is growing alarm that the cost of imported medicines will soar, as will insurance premiums, so basic healthcare will become sketchier for many and too pricey for the rest 

April 24, 2017
Ewn.co.za

Kenya: Diet Puts Children At Risk of Developing Diabetes

The chair of the Diabetes Association of Kenya called menus in schools ‘frightening’ saying schools are feeding children with lots of carbohydrates. The situation is made worse by unregulated development that leaves no room for playgrounds in schools and marketing that encourages the consumption of foods that not only contain carcinogens but also predispose them to cancer. What data on diabetes there is indicates that it is 3% in rural areas and 14% in urban ones – pointing at the potential scale of the problem 

April 25, 2017
allafrica.com, Daily Nation

One in five Vietnamese adults suffer from high blood pressure

It is estimated that around 12m people in Vietnam currently suffer from high blood pressure, meaning that one in every five adults has a condition that can cause a number of serious health problems. The warning was announced at a conference on the prevention of cardiovascular disease and hypertension in Hanoi by experts from the country’s ministry of health

April 25, 2017
VN Express, Asia Pacific Daily

Obesity, being overweight rising among Nigerian children — STUDY

A new report called ‘2016 Nigerian Report Card on Physical Activity for Children and Youth’ which focuses on physical activity as a major determinant of NCDs, has revealed a rising prevalence among Nigerian children of obesity and being overweight. Modelled after a similar Canadian report, the study highlighted that 12% of Nigerian children were obese and that schools were not complying with stipulated standards for physical activity for children

April 24, 2017
Vanguard Nigeria

Research busts myth of tribals’ mental health

A study by the Indian Council of Social Science Research (ICSSR) found a prevalence of somatic symptoms, psychological and physical ailments and a lower quality of life for the indigenous peoples in the Araku Valley of the Vizag district

April 24, 2017
Times of India

Drug created from malaria parasite shows promise as bladder cancer treatment

A drug created from a malaria protein stopped tumour growth of chemotherapy-resistant bladder cancer, offering hope for cancer patients not responding to standard treatments 

April 20, 2017
EurekaAlert, Medical News Today
April 23, 2017
News1130.com

Diabetes control tied to heart stent outcomes

For people with type 2 diabetes, maintaining good blood sugar control in the years after receiving a coronary stent is associated with a lower risk of heart attack and stroke, according to a recent study

April 20, 2017
Reuters

Queen’s ‘pride’ over princes’ mental health drive

The Queen has backed the decision by the Duke of Cambridge and Prince Harry to speak out about their mental health, expressing her pride at the campaign they have spearheaded with the Duchess of Cambridge. Their Heads Together scheme, tackling the stigma around mental health and encouraging others to speak more freely about their struggles, was the official charity of the London Marathon last weekend

April 23, 2017
The Times

As Public Attention Turns To Mental Health, Let’s Not Forget Women And Girls

About one in five women in the UK have a mental health problem, compared to one in eight men. Men remain far more likely to die by suicide, but there is a worrying increase in mental health issues with women, up 8.3% in a single year, and the number now stands at its highest rate in England in over a decade

April 24, 2017
Huffington Post

We’re Getting Closer to Mass Production of Bones, Organs, and Implants

Medical researchers have been able to create certain kinds of living cells with 3D printers for more than a decade. Now a few companies are getting closer to mass production of higher-order tissues (bone, cartilage, organs) and other individually tailored items, including implants. This kind of precision medicine, treating patients based on their genes, environment and lifestyle could herald the end of long organ donor lists and solve other problems too

April 27, 2017
Bloomberg

Tanzania: Challenges of Caring for Cancer Patients in Tanzania

There are three main causes: ageing population, rapid unplanned urbanization and the globalisation of unhealthy lifestyles. NCDs also have some common denominators: tobacco usage, alcohol intake, high blood pressure, diet and physical inactivity – these are acknowledged risk factors. There is a need for reliable statistics to understand the scale of the problem and the resources needed, as well as specialist training for cancer care and the equipment to support it

April 27, 2017
allafrica.com, The Citizen

The new crisis after HIV/AIDS knocks at the door

Mmegi Online reports that NCDs are the new crisis after HIV Aids now knocking at the door in Botswana. It discusses how the relentless rise of non-communicable diseases is putting growing pressure on the country’s health system with up to 37% of deaths from diseases annually in Botswana being linked to NCDs in some form

April 28, 2017
Mmegi.bw

Heart failure mortality is inversely related to wealth of country

Death in patients with heart failure is inversely related to the wealth of the country they live in, according to new research. Death rates in India and Africa were three to four times higher than those documented in Western countries

April 30, 2017
Science Daily

Disability can linger years after mild wartime brain injuries

Military service members who sustain concussions in combat may experience worsening symptoms for several years after their injuries, particularly if they have psychiatric problems, a small U.S. study suggests. The study found that after a concussion, symptoms got worse from one to five years following the injury. This suggests one common assumption guiding concussion treatment, that patients stabilize within a year of injury, may not be accurate, the study authors said

May 1, 2017
Reuters

Beware of searing pain in your belly

The main cause of pancreatitis is gallstones. There is a growing need for relevant government agencies to create awareness about the disease. This story also points out that the ‘young drinking generation’ of adults between 25-35 are particularly susceptible to the risks this disease poses

April 30, 2017
Nation

Food insecurity can affect your mental health

Food insecurity can affect people’s health beyond the basic levels of nutritional impact, according to a new study. Food insecurity is associated with poorer mental health and special psychosocial stressors across global regions, independent of an individuals’ socioeconomic status

April 27, 2017
Science Daily

Obesity "frightening" in Latin America, driving disease and draining economies- U.N.

More than two thirds of people living in Chile, Ecuador and Mexico are overweight or obese, costing their economies tens of billions of dollars every year, driving rates of disease and straining health services, a UN report said on Tuesday. The implications for the future of the countries is frightening, undernutrition is declining, but over-nutrition is expected to become the largest social and economic burden in the region, said the UN World Food Programme

April 25, 2017
Reuters

Study finds how polluting nanoparticles get into blood and damage hearts

Inhaled nanoparticles like those pumped out in vehicle exhausts can work their way through the lungs and into the bloodstream where they can raise the risk of heart attacks and strokes, scientists said on Wednesday. Most worryingly, scientists who conducted this experiment said, nanoparticles tend to build up in damaged blood vessels of people who already suffer from coronary heart disease and make it worse

April 26, 2017
Reuters, BBC

Government must boost investment in mental health care

An editorial article in the South China Morning Post called in the government to boost investment in the mental health care system. It called for a substantial increase in recurrent expenditure on psychiatrists, psychiatric nurses and social workers to meet the service demand without placing undue stress on the system and meet the needs of an ageing population which is growing in number

April 27, 2017
South China Morning Post

Specialists under fire for dismissing saturated fat link to heart disease

Heart experts have been criticized for claiming it is plain wrong to believe that saturated fats clog up arteries. Three specialists argued that eating real food, taking exercise and reducing stress are better ways to stave off heart disease than cutting out dietary saturated fat. The editorial, published in the British Journal of Sports Medicine, attracted scathing criticism for being too simplistic and misleading

April 26, 2017
Telegraph
April 25, 2017
British Nutrition Foundation, CBC News
April 26, 2017
SBS

Chandigarh health department starts screening for non-communicable diseases

The Chandigarh health department has started screening the residents in the age group of 30 and above for non-communicable diseases including cancer and diabetes. The screening is under the national programme for the Preventions of Cancer, Diabetes, Cardiovascular Diseases and Stroke

April 3, 2017
Indian Express

'Tuberculosis' kills 14 in Myanmar’s remote north

At least 14 people have died from pulmonary tuberculosis in a remote and impoverished region of Myanmar’s north this year, according to officials

March 9, 2017
Anadolu Agency
March 13, 2017
Daily Trust

World Kidney Day: Chronic kidney diseases on rise in sub urban India

Kidney diseases are rapidly increasing globally and reaching epidemic proportions. In the absence of a renal registry in India, the real extent of CKD is unknown, but with the rising prevalence of diabetes and hypertension in the country the prevalence of CKD is expected to increase

March 9, 2017
New Kerala

Depression may be biggest cause of lost productivity with sinus problems

A new study has been published which suggests that depression is the biggest source of lost productivity, along with chronic sinus problems, and this might cause sufferers to miss work or school

March 10, 2017
Reuters

Adults who were preemies may face more mental health risks

Adults who were born prematurely at a very low birth weight may be more likely to experience mental health problems such as depression and anxiety, a recent study indicated

March 10, 2017
Reuters

Cost of kidney dialysis poses ethical dilemma in sub-Saharan Africa

Up to a quarter of all adults in sub-Saharan Africa suffer from chronic kidney disease and only a small fraction ever reach a dialysis treatment centre, a new study has found. Of those who did begin dialysis, they usually quit within two weeks because they cannot afford to continue, and 88% of those died, the research found

March 10, 2017
Reuters

Gene-ius discovery: Fifty years after Barnard’s transplant, SA makes another cardiac breakthro...

South African researchers have discovered a gene that is a major cause of sudden death among under-35s, it is a discovery likely to put South Africa on the map in the world of genetics. The gene called CDH2, is found in everyone, but a mutation causes a genetic disease known as arrythmogenic right ventricle cardiomyopathy, which increases the risk of heart disease and cardiac arrest

March 10, 2017
Times Live

SA in crisis regarding kidney disease: Expert

South African experts say that the country is in crisis regarding kidney disease. Research says that 10-15% of people have some form of kidney disease, but only 240-250 transplants are carried out each year in the country’s hospitals, with 9,000 people currently on renal dialysis

March 9, 2017
SABC

Obamacare repeal seen as weakening mental health protections

The Medicaid aspects on Obamacare repeal are prompting concern from four Republican senators who are concerned about the prospect of reduced access to mental health and addiction services

March 8, 2017
Politico

Arthritis' toll rises as too few take steps to reduce pain: CDC

A new study found that around 54m U.S. adults, or one in four, have arthritis, with few engaging in the types of physical activities that can help to reduce pain and improve mobility

March 7, 2017
Reuters
March 8, 2017
Sina.com
March 7, 2017
AHA News

Novo Seen Missing Target of 40 Million Diabetics Treated by 2020

Novo Nordisk says it expects to fall short of its ambitious goal of doubling the number of diabetics it treats by the end of the decade, after it has failed to win some key government insulin contracts

March 8, 2017
Bloomberg

Intensive speech therapy helps months after stroke

A recent German study has shown that even months after a stroke, survivors can make major strides forward in terms of communication and quality of life with intensive speech therapy

March 8, 2017
Reuters

No salary for the last nine months: NACP employees forced to live on alms

Employees of the National Aid Control programme in Pakistan have not been paid for the last nine months and have had to live on hand outs and alms from the community. It seems the Ministry of Planning has wanted to consolidate the three programmes (HIV, TB and Malaria) into one programme to make it more effective, but it has just not got around to organising it 

March 8, 2017
Pakistan Today

Global fund to help solve India’s HIV drug crisis

After running out of the child-friendly HIV syrup, Lopinavir, India is likely to procure the drug from a rapid supply facility routed through the Global Fund for AIDS, TB and Malaria. At the same time, the Indian Health Ministry released the first instalment of the payment it owed to Cipla Pharmaceuticals, the sole manufacturer of the drug

March 8, 2017
The Hindu

Deadly fungal infection that doctors have been fearing now reported in U.S.

Nearly three dozen people in the United States have been diagnosed with a deadly and highly drug-resistant fungal infection since federal health officials first warned U.S. clinicians to be on the lookout for this emerging pathogen that has been spreading around the world

March 10, 2017
Washington Post

Social media making users feel isolated

A new study suggests that addiction to social media is increasingly leaving users socially isolated, despite spending hours chatting to friends on these platforms. Experts are suggesting a simple solution – go out more often and spend time with real people

March 12, 2017
News24

Tackling NCDs in Bhutan requires a different kind of aid

The government of Bhutan is deeply concerned about the rising burden of non-communicable diseases in the country and it is pondering measures to curb excess alcohol consumption, to increase servings of fruit and vegetables and to cut down on salt consumption. In 2015, Bhutan reported NCDs were the top causes of mortality in Bhutan, with liver disease associated with alcohol consumption topping the list

March 14, 2017
Devex

The GOP health plan may disrupt mental health care for those who need it the most

The GOP health care plan may disrupt mental health care for those who need it the most, because the U.S. States would then have to decide whether to cover the mental health costs for Medicaid recipients or not

March 15, 2017
Vox, NBC News

Cancer Drug That Might Slow Parkinson's, Alzheimer's Headed For Bigger Tests

Researchers at Georgetown University Medical Center are launching two larger and more rigorous trials of nilotinib, both designed with input from the Food & Drug Administration. One of the trials will enrol 75 patients with Parkinson’s Disease and the other will enrol 42 patients with Alzheimer’s. The hope is to find a single drug which can treat two devastating brain diseases

March 15, 2017
NPR

Indonesia tobacco bill would fire up output despite health fears

Indonesia’s parliament has proposed a draft law that could lead to a sharp increase in tobacco output, in a country which is already a top producer with one of the heaviest rates of smoking in the world. Health Minister, Nila Moeloek, said ‘her ministry definitely opposes the tobacco bill as it has the responsibility to safeguard the health of the people’

March 15, 2017
Reuters

Betting on the first disease to be treated by gene editing

Anticipating when CRISPR gene editing technology could be used to develop a cure for a myriad of possible diseases is difficult to assess. There are not only technical hurdles, but also ethical ones – such as gene editing in embryos to prevent diseases such as Huntington’s and Tay-Sachs. Even so, the race is on CNBC reports

March 15, 2017
CNBC

Sudden drops in BP may increase dementia risk

New research suggests that those who experience sudden blood pressure drop in middle age may be more likely to develop dementia in old age. This new study followed 11,503 patients who had no history of heart disease across two decades and saw that those who suffered from orthostatic hypotension in middle age were 40% more likely to develop dementia than those who did not. The team now speculate that the decrease in blood flow to the brain may play a pivotal role

March 14, 2017
Pakistan Today

Study identifies African-specific genomic variant associated with obesity

An international team of researchers conducted the first study of its kind to look at the genomic underpinnings of obesity in continental Africans and African-Americans. They discovered that approximately 1% of West Africans, African-Americans and others of African descent carry a genomic variant that increases their risk of obesity 

March 13, 2017
NIH

People with dementia 'failed' by deprivation of liberty law

People with dementia and learning difficulties are being detained in care without checks due to a failing law, the UK Law Commission has reported. Services cannot cope, deadlines were routinely breached and the system should be replaced

March 13, 2017
BBC

'8 in 10 tuberculosis cases undetected in Nigeria'

Nearly eight out of every ten cases of tuberculosis go undetected, according to the National TB and Leprosy Control Programme

March 13, 2017
Daily Trust
March 9, 2017
Anadolu Agency

Depression doubles long-term risk of death after heart disease diagnosis, new study findsam

Depression is the strongest predicator of death in the first decade following a diagnosis of coronary heart disease, according to a new study by researchers

March 13, 2017
Eureka Alert
March 14, 2017
Tech Times

Poor diet tied to nearly half of U.S. deaths from heart disease, stroke, diabetes

Ensuring that diets include the right amount of certain foods may help the U.S. cut deaths from heart disease, stroke and Type 2 diabetes by almost half, suggests a new study

March 7, 2017
Reuters
March 9, 2017
Sydney Morning Herald

Early warning signs of heart attacks 'being missed'

A study into all heart attack admissions and deaths between 2006 and 2010 was analysed by Imperial College Researchers. 16% of those who died had been admitted to hospital in the previous 28 days and some had warning signs like chest pains

March 1, 2017
BBC

Facebook turns to artificial intelligence to tackle suicides

Facebook plans to use artificial intelligence and update its tools and services to help prevent suicides among its users. It plans to integrate its existing suicide prevention tools for Facebook posts into its live-streaming feature, Facebook Live and its Messenger service

March 1, 2017
Reuters

Young people 'fear stigma' if they ask for mental-health help

Over three quarters of young people say there is ‘a stigma’ to mental illness and a quarter would not ask for help if they were suffering, a survey suggest

March 1, 2017
BBC

Roche trial finds new drug cocktail cuts breast cancer deaths

Roche’s bid to shield its ageing but lucrative oncology franchise from cheaper copies got a lift from a trial showing a new drug cocktail kept breast cancer patients alive longer. Combining its drug Perjeta with Herceptin and chemotherapy after surgery, cut recurrence of an aggressive type of early breast cancer or death, when compared to just Herceptin and chemo

March 2, 2017
Reuters

FT Health: Global Fund’s Oscars moment, EU health commissioner, antibiotic alert

Last week, the board of the world’s largest multilateral donor to tackle infectious diseases issued a deeply embarrassing statement that it was restarting the selection process for its new director

March 3, 2017
Financial Times

Venezuela's epileptic patients struggle with seizures amid drug shortage

Venezuela’s epileptic patients are struggling with seizures amid a drugs shortage according to Reuters

March 3, 2017
Reuters

'Epidemics' of TB and pneumonia could hit Ireland due to antibiotic resistance

Epidemics of TB and pneumonia could hit Ireland due to antibiotic resistance. The Journal pointed to misuse and overuse of medication, which will eventually fuel a nationwide health crisis, if the parlous state of antibiotic resistance is not reversed

March 3, 2017
The Journal

5 diseases that kill 16M people, cost the world economy $2.35T annually

Five NCDs that kill 16 million people around the world each year are projected to take a $47 trillion toll on worldwide economic activity over the next 20 years, according to a report from the World Economic Forum and Willis Towers Wilson. The five NCDs are: Cardiovascular disease, Mental illness, Cancer, Chronic respiratory disease and Diabetes

February 28, 2017
Becker`s Hospital Review

TB, Diabetes leading causes of natural deaths in 2015 - Stats SA

The leading underlying natural causes of death among South Africans in 2015 were tuberculosis and diabetes, Statistics South Africa said in a report

February 28, 2017
News24

Drug and mental health admissions highest for a decade

More patients are being admitted to hospital in England for drug-related mental health issues or poisoning than at any time in the past ten years. Official figures reveal 15,074 cases of people in hospital with illicit drug poisoning in 2015-16, up 51% on 10 years earlier. Mental health issues had drugs as a cause in 81,904 cases, according to the same report

February 28, 2017
BBC

Colon cancer rates rise among Gen X, millennials: study

Rates of colon and rectal cancer are rising sharply among young and middle-aged adults in the United States but doctors have yet to pinpoint the reasons why, researchers said in a report. The published findings added that generation X and millennials face anywhere from twice to four times the risk of colon and rectal cancer as their baby boomer counterparts

February 28, 2017
Yahoo

Obese couples may take longer to conceive

A recent study indicates that when both partners are obese the couple took up to 59% longer to conceive than non-obese counterparts

February 28, 2017
Reuters

Less than a stone of extra weight can boost cancer risk by half

A major new review led by Imperial College London concluded that being obese is linked to eleven different cancers and is associated with many others

February 28, 2017
The Telegraph, The Guardian

Somalia says 110 dead in last 48 hours due to drought

Some 100 people have died in southern Somalia in the last two days from famine and diarrhea resulting from drought, as the area braces itself for a widespread shortage of food

March 4, 2017
Reuters

More than 100 million at risk of starvation globally - U.N. official

The number of people facing severe hunger worldwide has surpassed 100m and will grow if humanitarian aid is not paired with more support for farmers, a UN official told Reuters Africa

March 4, 2017
Reuters

Scientists uncover genetic clues to rare kidney disease

A new study has identified genetic clues to understanding the cause of the rare kidney disease IgA nephropathy, or Berger’s disease

March 6, 2017
UPI, Science Daily, EurekaAlert
March 7, 2017
Daily Nation

Gene therapy relieves sickle cell in world first: study

Scientists have used gene therapy to relieve symptoms of a teenager suffering sickle cell disease in a world’s first breakthrough. The research team collected so-called haematopoietic stem cells from the bone marrow of the youngster, then aged 13. The immature cells were treated with a therapeutic gene, carried in a deactivated virus, which recoded the DNA to correct blood cell production. The treated cells were then reinjected into the boy’s body  

March 7, 2017
Japan Today

Gene activity in the nose may signal lung cancer

Genetic changes in the cells lining the inside the nose might someday help doctors to diagnose lung cancer, a recent study suggests

March 7, 2017
Reuters

Trump’s New Travel Ban Could Hinder Research On HIV And Mental Health

President Trump’s temporary travel ban has had consequences for a scientist at Harvard Medical School, who has been seeking to collaborate with Iranian academics on HIV/AIDs research. Another at Columbia Law School’s human rights clinic, wanted to study the impact of armed conflict on the mental health of people in Yemen

March 7, 2017
Huffington Post

Kidney disease's genetic clues are uncovered

Genetic Markers for Kidney Disease uncovered in new study

March 6, 2017
Science Daily, EurekaAlert
March 7, 2017
Nation

Medical experts warn of link between obesity and kidney disease

A new study reported that there is a strong link between obesity and kidney disease. Individuals with a low number of nephrons are the most susceptible to a change in the blood flow in the kidney due to obesity. Obesity hampers a child’s development and quality of life leading to secondary complications such as diabetes and cardiovascular diseases

March 5, 2017
New Straits Times

One third of lymphoma patients cancer free after 6 months in CAR-T gene therapy study

An experimental gene therapy that turns a patients’ own blood cells into cancer killers worked in a major study, with more than one-third of very sick lymphoma patients showing no signs of disease six months after a single treatment

March 6, 2017
Genetic Literacy Project

Gene Variants Linked To Fatal Gallbladder Cancer, New Study Finds

A recent study shows that some genetic variants are responsible for making certain individuals prone to develop gallbladder cancer. The study was carried out at around 700,000 varied locations of the genome in order to better understand the major cause of the fatal disease and to facilitate its treatment

March 6, 2017
Tech Times

Pfizer launches new antibiotic in the UK

Pfizer is launching a new antibiotic called Zavicefta in the UK. It is designed to treat serious aerobic Gram-negative infections caused by resistant bacteria 

March 15, 2017
Pharma Times
March 14, 2017
Pharma Letter, zenopa

Experts Say Chronic Kidney Disease in Sub-Saharan Africa on Rise

Amid rapid urbanization, the HIV epidemic and increasing rates on NCDs people in sub-Saharan Africa are especially vulnerable to kidney disease. With CKD on the rise across the continent many are liable to die each year simply due to lack of access to affordable treatment

March 15, 2017
Voice of America
March 13, 2017
Guardian Nigeria

Nearly $800 billion spent per year in U.S. on neurological diseases

A new report shows the United States spends an estimated $789bn annually on neurological disorders including Alzheimer’s and Parkinson’s disease. The list also includes dementia, low back pain, stroke, traumatic brain injury, migraine, epilepsy, multiple sclerosis and spinal cord injury

March 28, 2017
UPI, Public Now

High-fibre diet key in fight against diabetes, study show

A diet that boosts good bacteria in the stomach could be the key to reducing the risks of diabetes, an Australian study has found. Researchers from Melbourne’s Monash University found for the first time that a diet rich in fermentable fibre stopped mice from developing Type 1 diabetes. The researchers recognised further study work in this area is required

March 28, 2017
Standard Media
March 29, 2017
Hans India
March 28, 2017
Press Trust of India

Non-communicable diseases, threat to the world

The Burundi Non-Communicable Disease Alliance and the East African Non-Communicable Disease Alliance held a revealing workshop where patients detailed some of the various challenges they faced to get healthcare. One said diagnosis of NCDs in Burundi is tricky. In order to get a cancer diagnosis many need to travel abroad. Cancer drugs are virtually non-existent in Burundi. Waiting lists are often too long and treatment too expensive for most. The event view was that NCDs pose a serious risk to the population with little data on prevalence but the number dying from NCDs rises every day

March 28, 2017
Iwacu-English News

Cost of respiratory illnesses in New Zealand hits $6b and rising

A new study says that around one in six New Zealanders live with a respiratory illness and the rate is rising, with latest estimates showing the cost to the country has hit more than 56bn a year. Respiratory disease accounted for one in ten hospitalizations and highlighted the degree of socio-economic and ethnic inequality as by far the most relentless and disturbing pattern

March 28, 2017
New Zealand Herald, Waatea News

What a relief: cutting salt avoids toilet trips

Reducing salt significantly decreases the need to make night trips to the lavatory, research indicates. Nocturia affects more than half of the over-50s and leaves them feeling fatigued and irritable in the morning. Japanese researchers now believe it can be resolved with a minor dietary adjustment

March 27, 2017
The Times
March 26, 2017
Telegraph

Every 40 seconds a person commits suicide in world

A Rawalpindi conference on mental health was told that over 800,000 people die of suicide every year around the globe and 75% of those occur in low or middle income countries such as Pakistan. Suicide is the second leading cause of death among ages 15-29 and most alarmingly there is a death from suicide every 40 seconds

March 28, 2017
The News Pakistan

What is Mental Healthcare Bill?

The Indian parliament passed a Mental Healthcare Bill which decriminalizes suicide attempts by mentally ill people and provides services for people with mental illnesses

March 28, 2017
Indian Express, India.com
March 27, 2017
Hindustan Times

Novartis Looks to World's Rich to Meet Need in Chronic Ailments

Novartis is in talks with banks to create a fund for investors interested in opportunities that have a social impact, Harald Nusser said in an interview. A $1bn fund started by the Abrajal Group, the Dubai-based private equity firm, is a potential model he said

March 30, 2017
Bloomberg

More evidence linking stress to obesity

A new study using hair to measure long-term levels of the stress hormone cortisol confirms the link between chronic stress and packing on the pounds, as well as explaining the difficulty in shedding excess

March 30, 2017
Reuters

Hepatitis Infection May Raise Risk for Parkinson's Disease

People with the liver infection hepatitis may be at heightened risk of developing Parkinson’s disease, a large new study suggests. The study is the second in the past year to link Parkinson’s and hepatitis

March 30, 2017
Drugs.com

Can grandma help spot autism earlier?

Kids with autism who spend a lot of time with their grandmas may get diagnosed with the disorder at a younger age, a small study has suggested. Earlier diagnosis means earlier intervention, which is critical for improving treatment outcomes

March 31, 2017
Reuters

Overweight, obese young men at increased risk of liver disease

Young men who are overweight or obese have up to double the risk of normal-weight peers of developing liver disease later in life, a large study in Sweden suggests. If the young men also had type 2 diabetes, their risk of having liver disease by the time they reached middle age was as much as 3.3 times higher, researchers reported in the journal Gut

March 31, 2017
Reuters

With 30 crore patients, depression now No 1 reason for ill health

Depression is now the leading cause of ill health and disability in the world, according to WHO. The condition has overtaken lower respiratory disease as the biggest global health problem. WHO identifies a link between depression and other mental and physical health problems; the risk of substance abuse and diseases such as diabetes and heart disease

April 2, 2017
The Times of India

Promoting mental well-being ensures sustainable development

A mentally healthy citizen is able to study, form relationships and engage in work that contributes towards the economic growth of the community and nation. The direct consequence of this is poverty reduction. Poverty is linked to worse health outcomes so a more virtuous circle begins 

April 1, 2017
Star Kenya

'Let's Talk', WHO says, as depression rates rise 18 percent in a decade

Depression is now the leading cause of ill health and disability worldwide, the World Health Organization said, with more than 300 million people suffering. Rates of depression have risen by more than 18% since 2005, but a lack of support for mental health combined with a common fear of stigma means many do not get the treatment they need to live healthy, productive lives 

March 30, 2017
Reuters

Sickle cell: A silent killer in Chhattisgarh state

According to a 2013 report Raipur, 10% of Chhattisgarh’s population is affected by the hereditary blood disease sickle cell syndrome, with the state’s indigenous tribal population disproportionately affected. The Gond tribe in the region suffers from a rate as high 20%. And it can also be more prevalent among lower castes such as the Kurmi and Sahu, where rates are also at 20 and 22% respectively

March 29, 2017
AlJazeera

New Mental Healthcare Bill decriminalises suicide attempt

The new Mental Healthcare Bill passed by the Lok Sabha decriminalises suicide attempts and bans the use of electric shock therapy for treating children with mental illness. The bill also gives an opportunity to a person to give advanced directions on the kind of treatment they would want in the event they were diagnosed with a mental illness in the future  

March 29, 2017
Hindustan Times, First Post
March 28, 2017
India Today

U.S. approves Roche drug that targets severe form of MS

Roche’s multiple sclerosis drug Ocrevus won U.S. approval, putting it back on track after a brief delay and giving a lift to patients with a more severe form of the disease that until now had no approved treatment

March 29, 2017
Reuters

Brain implant lets paralyzed man feed himself using his thoughts

A paralyzed man in Cleveland fed himself mashed potatoes for the first time in eight years, aided by a computer brain interface that reads his thoughts and sends signals to move muscles in his arm, U.S. researchers said. This research published in The Lancet is from BrainGate, a consortium of researchers testing brain-computer interface technology designed to give paralyzed individuals more mobility

March 29, 2017
Reuters

12 new genes causing ovarian cancer identified

A dozen new genetic variants that have the potential to increase the risk of women developing ovarian cancer have been identified by a team of international scientists, in a study of nearly 100,000 people

March 29, 2017
Hans India
March 28, 2017
Press Trust of India
March 24, 2017
IFLScience

Diabetics more prone to TB: SVIMS study

Diabetes is increasingly becoming a major contributor to TB, worldwide data shows. Epidemiological modelling data suggests 14.8% of all pulmonary TB cases in India and 20% of sputum smear positive cases have diabetes, suggesting it’s a substantial contributor to the burden of TB, in addition to HIV/AIDS, corticosteroid, immune-suppressant drug use and alcoholism

March 25, 2017
The Hindu
March 27, 2017
The Hindu

Stigma attached to mental disorders leading to high mental morbidity in India: Experts

More than 100m people in India (over 10% of the population) suffer from mental health disorders such as depression and anxiety, but society’s views about these disorders are clouded by misconceptions and stigma, which in turn leads to high mental morbidity in India

March 22, 2017
New Kerala
March 21, 2017
India Blooms

New Antibiotic Resistant Gene Variant Found In Healthy Individual

A team of investigators in China has discovered a new variant on a well-known gene that causes resistance to last resort antibiotics. More troubling, the antibiotic resistant gene was found in a healthy individual during a routine medical examination, suggesting that other healthy carriers may be spreading this resistance unknowingly

March 21, 2017
Asian Scientist

'Greater focus on research in multi-drug resistant TB needed'

The Indian Society for Clinical Research said it believed there needs to be a greater focus on research into multi-drug resistant TB. This will lead to the development of innovative treatments for drug-resistant TB and reduce India’s healthcare cost burden and save lives

March 22, 2017
Times of India

Abortion is a women’s issue. So why do men dominate media coverage of it?

A new report commissioned by the Women’s Media Center analysed 1,385 pieces of news on abortion, including opinion columns and editorials that appeared in 12 publications and found that men wrote 52% of those pieces which had a by-line attached , while women wrote just 37% of them

March 22, 2017
Washington Post

Preocupación en Perú por posible propagación de enfermedades luego de las inundaciones

Worry spreads in Peru as many fear the likely spread of a range of waterborne diseases on the back of the recent torrential rains

March 22, 2017
CNN Chile

Safe water: 97,000 kids die yearly from diarrhoea

For every 2,000 children under five who die from diarrhoea, more than 1800 of those deaths are actually linked to water sanitation and hygiene, evidence suggests

March 22, 2017
Daily Trust

UnitedHealth sued for denying coverage for eating disorders

UnitedHealth Group has been hit with a proposed class action lawsuit accusing the largest U.S. health insurer of denying coverage for medically necessary treatment of eating disorders

March 21, 2017
Reuters

'Guns don't kill soldiers... SAMOSAS do': India's 'fat soldiers' paramilitary forces lose more m...

The South African Stroke and Heart Foundation said for many South Africans salt intake is too high with much of it hidden in processed food and bread. The nation may have more ‘supertasters,’ with the gene prevalent in Africa, which may mean that South Africans in particular are driven to eat more salt by greater taste sensitivity

March 16, 2017
Daily Mail

Higher rate of second heart attacks in patients who can't tolerate statins

In a study of more than 105,000 older Americans, who had one heart attack, those who could not tolerate statins were 50% more likely, than those who stayed on statins, to have a second heart attack

March 15, 2017
Reuters

Migrant mental health crumbles in Greece: rights groups

Refugees and migrants stuck in Greek camps, including children as young as nine, are cutting themselves, attempting suicide and using drugs to cope with endless misery international charities report. MSF and Save the Children said ‘anxiety, depression and aggression were on the rise as a direct result of the deal the EU struck with Turkey to stem the flow of refugees’

March 16, 2017
Reuters

Gonorrhoea, world’s second commonest STD, may become untreatable

Experts are saying that gonorrhoea may become untreatable due to its resistance to antibiotic drugs that were hitherto used to treat it. As the disease is rapidly developing this resistance to new antibiotics, this means there are fewer alternative treatments

March 20, 2017
Punch Nigeria

BSF losing more men to lifestyle diseases, mental illness than operations: Director General KK S...

More Border Security Force personnel are dying of mental illnesses and lifestyle diseases than in the line of duty, BSF Director General, KF Sharma said on Tuesday. As a consequence of the study the force is taking some remedial measures to control lifestyle disease by including yoga in the daily routine and changing the dietary

March 21, 2017
Times of India

Venezuela's spiralling mental healthcare crisis

Al Jazeera reports on Venezuela’s economic strife and how the healthcare system is left struggling to cope with the nation’s growing mental health crisis

March 20, 2017
AlJazeera

Physicians rank high in suicide cases, experts lament

Physicians in Nigeria have been known to rank high in suicide cases. Most doctors are stressed and depressed because of workload and poor remuneration, family expectation and friends. Many are going through a lot but they hardly have time to attend to their own health and often simply continue to just about manage until they reach breaking point

March 25, 2017
Vanguard Nigeria

People with type 2 diabetes need to get off their chairs

People with Type 2 diabetes who sit all day have a riskier blood fat mixture than those who move around or exercise periodically throughout the day, according to researchers in Australia. Breaking up sitting reduces the levels of lipids in the bloodstream that are associated with type 2 diabetes and its complications

March 24, 2017
Reuters
March 25, 2017
Business Standard

1 in 5 Indians suffers from liver disease: Doctors

One in every five Indians suffers from liver disease for which alcohol consumption and Hepatitis C are found to be the top causes. As many as 30% of Indians suffer from fatty liver and a quarter of this number develop liver cirrhosis and liver failure

March 25, 2017
Deccan Chronicle

Nigeria: Kidney Patients Battling for Their Lives in Sokoto

About 10% of Nigeria’s population has some form of kidney disease, but only 2% were in hospital for diagnosis or treatment. Only a maximum of 100,000 out of two millions Nigerians with the problem are on dialysis while the rest are battling to survive because they cannot afford it

March 25, 2017
allafrica.com, Daily Trust

Palliative care linked to fewer repeat hospitalizations

Comfort care for advanced cancer patients is associated with fewer repeat hospitalizations and more hospice referrals, according to a study highlighting how this approach may offer chronically sick or terminally ill people a better quality of life

March 23, 2017
Reuters

Steady Fall in Suicides Offers Glimmer of Hope in Japan

Fewer Japanese people are taking their own lives, a positive sign in a country with one of the world’s highest suicide rates. The number of cases in 2016, 21,897, is the lowest number since 1994

March 23, 2017
Bloomberg

RS Passes Bill To Safeguard Rights, Provide Medical Help For HIV/AIDS Patients

A crucial bill to ensure equal rights to people afflicted by HIV and AIDS in getting treatment, admission in educational institutions and jobs was passed by the Rajya Sabbha

March 22, 2017
Huffington Post, News18
March 24, 2017
Hindustan Times
March 21, 2017
First Post
March 22, 2017
zeenews

‘Deaths of Despair’ Are Surging Among the White Working Class

Researchers who sounded the alarm on increasing white working class mortality blamed the trend on economic upheaval that has created a web of social issues so tightly interwoven than even successful policies would take years to unsnarl them. Mortality and morbidity rates began climbing in the late 1990s for less educated whites between 45 and 54. That came as progress against heart disease and cancer slowed and drug overdoses, suicide and alcoholism – so-called deaths of despair – became pervasive

March 23, 2017
Bloomberg, Vox

Two thirds of cancers caused by random genetic mistakes: U.S. study

About two thirds of cancers are caused by random typos in DNA that occur as normal cells make copies of themselves, a finding that helps explains why healthy individuals who do everything they can to avoid cancer are still stricken with the disease, U.S. researchers said. The new findings are based on genetic sequencing and cancer studies from 69 countries around the world

March 23, 2017
Reuters
March 26, 2017
University Herald, IFLScience

‘Healthy’ obese still face higher heart disease risk

Even without high blood pressure or other signs of illness, obese adults have a much higher risk of developing heart disease than normal weight peers, according to a new study from Denmark

March 23, 2017
Reuters

Smoking only in social situations may still be tied to heart problems

So-called social smokers who only light up on special occasions may have some of the same risks for heart disease as people with a daily cigarette habit, a new U.S. study suggests. Compared with non-smokers, social smokers were more than twice as likely to have high-blood pressure and 53% more likely to have elevated cholesterol than non-smokers. So that worked out at about the same percentage risk as those who were current smokers

May 11, 2017
Reuters

New Strains of Rice May Help Fight China's Diabetes Scourge

Bloomberg features the story of the international research project which is seeking to improve the nutritional value of rice, in particular, trying to develop a new strain of rice which would avoid raising blood-sugar. The rationale behind the development is that diabetes risks affecting up to 151m people in China by 2040 and food that can combat some of the causes of raised blood sugar through bio-fortification can only be beneficial in terms of health

May 12, 2017
Bloomberg

BRCA1, BRCA2 study provides new clarity on breast cancer risk for carriers of gene mutations

A new study has provided a better understanding of the risk of breast cancer for carriers of the BRCA1 and BRCA2 gene mutation, which points to the need for early identification and lifelong monitoring of the disease. The study published in the Journal of the American Medical Association involved almost 10,000 women in Australia, the United States and Europe over 20 years, and found that those with the BRCA1 mutation had, on average, a 72 per cent risk of developing breast cancer by the age of 80. For those with the BRCA2 mutation, the risk of breast cancer was 69 per cent and the lifetime risk of ovarian cancer was 17 per cent

June 20, 2017
ABC.Net

Combo of sleep apnea and insomnia linked to depression in men

Men with both obstructive sleep apnea and insomnia are much more likely to have depression symptoms compared to men with either sleep disorder alone, suggests a recent Australian study. The depression symptoms also seem to be worse for men who have both apnea and insomnia compared to men with depression but without this combination of sleep problems, the authors report in the journal Respirology. Researchers found that more than half of the men had undiagnosed obstructive sleep apnea

June 20, 2017
Reuters

WHO links Yoga to preventing lifestyle diseases; says it can be practised at all ages

“Yoga can be practised at all ages. It can prevent lifestyle diseases,” Dr Poonam Khetrapal Singh, WHO Regional Director for South-East Asia, said ahead of the International Day of Yoga. She said the only requirement is “a commitment to better health and a willingness to gently stretch, exercise and invigorate one’s body and mind”. “It (Yoga) can help kids get the 60 minutes of daily activity (which is) needed to set up a lifetime of good health. It can help adults reach the 150 minutes of weekly activity needed to stave off non-communicable diseases,” she said. “For persons aged 65 and above it can help reduce the risk of depression and maintain cognitive functioning”.

June 20, 2017
BDNews24, Jakarta Post, Hindustan Times

Cash incentives to lose weight: Could this help solve Asia’s obesity epidemic?

Academics in Singapore say giving obese people cash incentives to lose weight could help stem the rise in non-communicable diseases. In a study researchers used insights from behavioural economics to develop rewards programmes aimed at addressing the disconnect between long-term health and short-term temptation. “Our findings not only show the value of rewards in increasing weight loss but they also show this can be done in a manner which minimizes third party payments, such as those by employers or insurers. This should help to expand access to these type of programmes” the researchers concluded

June 19, 2017
Food Navigator Asia

Tackling sickle cell disease

Lack of sickle cell equipment for early detection of sickle cell disease in children is cited to be one of the contributing factors that leads to a high number of deaths from the disease in Tanzania. The government, in partnership with Medomix Business Development launched a facility to diagnose sickle cell disease. The new technology does not require electricity, it could be used in remote areas and it does not require an expert to interpret the results. It has a 99% specificity and sensitivity rating

June 19, 2017
The Citizen, AllAfrica.com

Anti-PCSK9 vaccine lowers cholesterol, atherosclerosis in mice

A study published in the European Heart Journal concludes that it may be possible to immunize people against developing high cholesterol and atherosclerosis, or the narrowing of the arteries. The vaccine, AT04A, consists of a molecule that prompts the body to produce antibodies against the enzyme. Once PCSK9 is inhibited, the body is able to properly clear LDL cholesterol. When the vaccine was injected in mice that were fed fatty food to induce high cholesterol and atherosclerosis, their total cholesterol fell 53%. Damage to blood vessels fell 64%, while blood vessel inflammation decreased by at least 21%, the scientists said

June 19, 2017
Fiercebiotech
June 20, 2017
UPI, Pharmazeutische Zeitung

Public ignorant about Noncommunicable diseases, says minister

Health Minister Dr. Jane Aceng has called for sensitization of the public about non-communicable diseases. Speaking during an alignment meeting in Kampala, Aceng said there is an increase of NCDs, adding that about 97% of the population do not know about these diseases. She added that a recent study on NCDs shows that heart diseases are on the rise, hypertension at 10% and diabetes at 3%. Aceng said in the cost effective management of diseases, emphasis should be placed on ability to detect them as early as possible

June 19, 2017
New Vision

Occasional smokers who vape smoke more cigarettes

Tobacco companies have been selling electronic cigarettes as a way to wean smokers off paper cigarettes, but a new study suggests the strategy could backfire. The report in Preventive Medicine found that young adults who occasionally smoked conventional cigarettes smoked more of them if they also used e-cigarettes. “The participants who were vaping ended up using more cigarettes. It’s actually a risk factor for increasing their cigarette use,” lead author Neal Doran said

June 19, 2017
Reuters

Global diabetes jumped 40% in the last two years, report says

Aetna International released “Diabetes: The world’s weightiest health challenge,” that found that diabetes has nearly doubled around the world since 2014-2016 with a 69% increase in North and South America last year alone. However, the Middle East and Africa were among the hardest hit, having the highest rate of diabetes over the last two years—that were twice the size of Europe and the Americas—and triple of Southeast Asia. Stella George, M.D. and senior medical director at Aetna International, who co-authored the report says the disease has the power to destroy “economies” if we don’t try to stop it now

June 19, 2017
Fox Business

Health ministry in new drive against drug abuse

The Ministry of Health of Rwanda has unveiled a six month campaign against drug abuse focusing on prevention and treatment of mental disorders. It will be launched during the International Day against Drug Abuse on June 26 which will be held in Kirehe, a district, which according to the officials, is among the main entry points for cannabis and illegal brews. It will also involve sensitisation of health providers on their role in prevention and creation of anti-drug abuse clubs in schools, general sensitisation through media

June 19, 2017
New Times, AllAfrica.com

Air pollution tied to survival odds for liver cancer patients

For people diagnosed with liver cancer, living in an area with heavy air pollution from industry, traffic or smoke is linked to lower odds of survival, a California study finds. The association between levels of tiny particles known as PM 2.5 in the air and death from liver cancer or from any cause was strongest for people with the least advanced cancers, researchers report in the International Journal of Cancer. “Our study suggests that liver cancer patients may be another susceptible group that could benefit from reductions in air pollution,” study co-author Sandrah Eckel said

June 21, 2017
Reuters

Tonga’s obesity epidemic is causing big trouble in paradise

According to a recent academic paper published by the UK medical magazine Lancet, Tonga is now the “most obese country in the world”. Today over 90 per cent of adults in this island nation of 107,000 people are either obese or overweight using the internationally-accepted BMI rating. In Tonga, average life expectancy has dropped from 72 ½ years in 2012 to 67 years today. And this former British Protectorate is now facing an epidemic of non-communicable diseases such as cardiovascular diseases and respiratory illnesses

June 21, 2017
Equal Times

Screen kids and teens for obesity, U.S. experts say

Children and teens should be screened for obesity at doctors` offices starting at age 6 and advised to attend intensive weight management programs if needed, according to a U.S.-government backed panel. The recommendation, from the U.S. Preventive Services Task Force (USPSTF), reinforces the panel`s previous guidelines, according to its chairperson. "Overall, (the) prevalence of obesity has levelled off, but we do see increasing rates in some populations," said Dr. David Grossman, of the Kaiser Permanente Washington Research Institute in Seattle

June 21, 2017
Reuters

U.S. physicians move to more flexible mammogram schedule

Women at average risk for breast cancer should be offered screening mammograms every year or two starting at age 40 and they should start regular screening no later than age 50, an influential U.S. group of obstetricians and gynaecologists said. Amid divided expert opinions on whether more screenings are beneficial, the American College of Obstetricians and Gynaecologists, which previously recommended yearly screenings starting at age 40, wants to stress shared decision-making between women and their doctors based on their personal preferences in the new, more flexible schedule

June 22, 2017
Reuters

Racism tied to worse asthma symptoms for black youth

African-American children and young adults with a hard-to-treat type of asthma may have a more difficult time keeping symptoms in check when they have experienced racial discrimination, a recent study suggests. Researchers asked 576 black youth in the U.S. with asthma whether they had been hassled, made to feel inferior or prevented from doing something because of their race, ethnicity, color or language in situations at school, in medical settings or at restaurants and stores. Roughly half of them reported experiencing some form of discrimination at some point in their lives. When they had not experienced these forms of discrimination, the children and young adults were almost twice as likely to have well-controlled asthma than when they had, researchers report in the journal PLoS One

June 22, 2017
Reuters

Relatives of people with fatty liver cirrhosis also at risk

If a parent or sibling has cirrhosis due to non-alcoholic fatty liver disease, a person`s odds of having liver scarring are more than 12 times higher than for people without close relatives who have this condition, a small study finds. Non-alcoholic fatty liver disease (NAFLD) is the most common cause of liver disease in the U.S., the study team writes in the Journal of Clinical Investigation. The more severe form of NAFLD, non-alcoholic steatohepatitis (NASH), tends to develop in people who are overweight or obese or who have diabetes, high cholesterol or high triglycerides, according to the American Liver Foundation

June 22, 2017
Reuters

Novartis heart drug success opens up new care option

A Novartis anti-inflammatory drug cut cardiovascular risk for heart attack survivors in a pivotal trial, potentially changing ideas about treatment. Canakinumab, already approved as Ilaris for rare autoimmune conditions, was also found to reduce further heart attacks or strokes, when used with current therapies, the drugmaker said. The drug targets inflammatory atherosclerosis, where inflammation aggravates risks posed by clogged arteries

June 22, 2017
Reuters

Heart healthy lifestyle tied to lower drug costs

People with heart disease spend a lot less on medications when they take steps to lower their risk of complications by doing things like getting enough exercise, avoiding cigarettes and keeping their blood pressure in check, a U.S. study suggests. For the study, researchers focused on adults diagnosed with the most common type of heart disease, atherosclerosis. When these patients did as much as they could to avoid so-called modifiable risk factors for heart disease - inactivity, obesity, smoking, high cholesterol, elevated blood pressure and diabetes - their total average annual pharmaceutical expenditures were $1,400, the study found. But patients who did little to modify these risk factors had total average annual pharmaceutical expenditures of $4,516

June 21, 2017
Reuters

Mother's heart health tied to breastfeeding

A woman`s risk of suffering a heart attack or stroke later in life may be influenced by how long she breastfed her children, according to a new study from China. Women who reported having breastfed for any amount of time were about 9 percent less likely than mothers who never breastfed to have signs of coronary heart disease, like a heart attack, in middle age and later and about 8 percent less likely to have a stroke. "This study suggests that it reduces the mother’s risk of developing cardiovascular disease," said study author Zhengming Chen, of the University of Oxford in the UK. But, Chen added, the study does not prove a direct or causal link between not breastfeeding and poor cardiovascular health

June 21, 2017
Reuters

In just one year, nearly 1.3 million Americans needed hospital care for opioid-related issues

The coast-to-coast opioid epidemic is swamping hospitals, with government data showing 1.27 million emergency room visits or inpatient stays for opioid-related issues in a single year. The 2014 numbers, the latest available for every state and the District of Columbia, reflect a 64 percent increase for inpatient care and a 99 percent jump for emergency room treatment compared to figures from 2005. Their trajectory likely will keep climbing if the epidemic continues unabated

June 20, 2017
Washington Post, Fierce Healthcare, The Guardian

U.S. Supreme Court ruling threatens massive talc litigation against J&J

Johnson & Johnson is seizing upon a U.S. Supreme Court ruling limiting where injury lawsuits can be filed to fight off claims it failed to warn women that talcum powder could cause ovarian cancer. A fifth of the plaintiffs have cases pending in state court in St. Louis, where juries in four trials have hit J&J and a talc supplier with $307 million in verdicts. Those four cases and most of the others on the St. Louis docket involve out-of-state plaintiffs suing an out-of-state company. On Monday, the Supreme Court ruled 8-1 in a case involving Bristol-Myers Squibb Co that state courts cannot hear claims against companies that are not based in the state when the alleged injuries did not occur there

June 20, 2017
Reuters

New Three-in-One Blood Test for Prostate Cancer

Scientists have developed a three-in-one blood test that could transform treatment of advanced prostate cancer through use of precision drugs designed to target mutations in the BRCA genes. By testing cancer DNA in the bloodstream, researchers found they could pick out which men with advanced prostate cancer were likely to benefit from treatment with PARP inhibitors. They also used the test to analyse DNA in the blood after treatment had started, so people who were not responding could be identified and switched to alternative therapy in as little as four to eight weeks

June 20, 2017
Technology Networks, Bioscience Technology, , Aerzteblatt

Health experts call for more action on tobacco control

Health experts and stakeholder organisations in Ghana have declared a seven-point plan of action to be taken by the government on tobacco control, the reduction of its usage and its effect on non-communicable diseases and premature deaths. The actions place emphasis on the promotion of partnerships, building of capacities of different stakeholders to advocate, support and monitor progress on tobacco control as part of the Sustainable Development Goals implementation effort

June 18, 2017
Business Ghana

High obesity rates stealing the youth of SA kids

Rising obesity rates in South African youth are crippling their ability to live healthy lives and fully enjoy their youth as more and more develop life-threatening chronic diseases like Type II diabetes. This is according to the Healthy Living Alliance (HEALA), an alliance of organisations with a mission to promote healthy living. According to PRICELESS SA, a 20 percent sugary drinks tax is needed to facilitate much-needed daily dietary adjustments to reduce sugar consumption as it has been modelled to result in 220,000 fewer obese South Africans. Proof that this policy lever can be effective has also been established in a study conducted among households of lower socio-economic status in Mexico which showed a decline in sugary drinks consumption two years after a tax was implemented

June 17, 2017
IOL

Daily aspirin behind more than 3,000 deaths a year, study suggests

Taking a daily aspirin is far more dangerous than was thought, causing more than 3,000 deaths a year, a major study suggests. The study by Oxford University found that those over the age of 75 who take the blood-thinning pills are ten times more likely than younger patients to suffer disabling or fatal bleeds. Researchers said patients of this age who have already suffered heart attacks or strokes should still take the daily tablet, but should also take an extra drug to reduce the risk of bleeding

June 13, 2017
The Telegraph

Will AstraZeneca's SGLT2-favoring data win the class a shot at front-line diabetes use?

A real-world analysis showed that SGLT2 diabetes meds from AstraZeneca, Johnson & Johnson and the Eli Lilly-Boehringer Ingelheim team could dramatically cut down on heart failure hospitalizations and deaths. Now, new analyses have confirmed those findings—and may make a case for using the class earlier in treatment, AZ’s execs suggest. Researchers separated patients into two groups, one with existing CV disease and the other without. They saw “the same signal, just as robust, in those two different patient populations in terms of the SGLT2 class lowering the risk of hospitalizations for heart failure and death as well,” Jim McDermott, AstraZeneca’s Medical Affairs lead for diabetes, said

June 13, 2017
Fierce Pharma, PR Newswire

Nearly 10 million U.S. adults suffer from mental illness

Nearly 10 million American adults have a serious mental illness, and a similar number have considered suicide during the past year, according to a new government report on the nation`s behavioural ills. The report also said that 15.7 million Americans abuse alcohol and 7.7 million abuse illicit drugs. Despite the growing number of Americans with mental health problems, about a third of those who need help aren`t getting it, said SAMHSA researcher Dr. Beth Han

June 13, 2017
KTTC.com

In 35 years, obesity doubled among children and tripled in adults: Study

Obesity in India more than doubled in children and tripled in adults between 1980 and 2015, shows an analysis of data from 195 countries from the Global Burden of Disease Study. According to the study, India’s 180 million adults, including 14.4 million children between the ages of two and 19 years, are obese. “The rate at which obesity is growing in children is quite alarming as it means we will be faced with a large number of obese adults, prone to non-communicable diseases such as diabetes, cardiovascular diseases and even certain types of cancer,” said Dr VK Bahl, head of cardiology department at AIIMS

June 13, 2017
Hindustan Times

People with albinism face poverty, abandonment, danger and death

June 13 marks International Albinism Awareness Day, established by the United Nations to bring global attention to understanding albinism and fighting discrimination and stigma. The average person with albinism in East Africa dies by age 30 from skin cancer, and only 2 percent of people with albinism live to age 40, according to Asante Mariamu, a U.S. organisation that raises awareness of albinism in East Africa. People with albinism also fall victim to ritual attacks in regions where superstition says their body parts bring power, wealth and good luck

June 13, 2017
Trust.org

Ghana Records 60,000 Cancer Cases Annually - Dr Joel Yarney

Dr Joel Yarney, the Head of the Medical Centre for Radiotherapy and Nuclear Medicine at the Korle-Bu Teaching Hospital, said about 60,000 cancer cases are recorded by Ghana annually. He said out of this figure 2,500 were breast cancer cases, and this requires that urgent action be taken to ensure prevention and treatment, along with improvements in quality of care

June 13, 2017
Peace FM

US mental-health agency’s push for basic research has slashed support for clinical trials

Analysis reveals that the number of clinical trials funded by the National Institute of Mental Health has fallen by 45% since the agency began to focus on the biological roots of disease. An analysis by Nature suggests that the number of clinical trials funded by the NIMH dropped by 45% between 2009 and 2015. This coincides with the agency’s launch, in 2011, of the Research Domain Criteria (RDoC) — a framework for research on the mechanisms of mental illness. The NIMH’s roll-out of RDoC included asking researchers to focus more on the biological bases of behaviour — such as brain circuitry and genetics — than on the broader symptoms that clinicians typically use to define and classify mental illness

June 13, 2017
Nature

J&J diabetes drug shows heart benefit in large safety study

Johnson & Johnson`s type 2 diabetes drug Invokana significantly reduced the risk of serious heart problems in patients with established heart disease or at elevated risk in a pair of large studies, according to data presented at a medical meeting. The medicine also led to a reduced risk of hospitalization for heart failure and protection against kidney function decline. But the risk of amputations, particularly of toes or feet, was double versus placebo in the studies of 10,142 patients with type 2 diabetes

June 12, 2017
Reuters
June 13, 2017
Pharmacy Practice News, Tech Times

COPD remains poorly addressed

Rising incidence of chronic obstructive pulmonary disorder (COPD) belies awareness levels about the condition among the masses warranting greater awareness. “Besides smoking, in rural India, COPD is also being increasingly seen among women exposed to biomass cooking fuel. Post tuberculosis treatment, some patients who have not initiated treatment on time also have COPD,” said K. Subhakar, superintendent, Government Chest Hospital, calling for government’s intervention to address lung health, including controlling the availability of cigarettes

June 11, 2017
The Hindu

Drug reduces dyskinesia, 'off' times in Parkinson's patients

An experimental extended-release version of the drug amantadine can reduce the duration of the involuntary dancing-like movements seen in people whose long-term use of levodopa has kept their Parkinson’s disease under control. The results may help doctors walk a tightrope in treating the tremors and muscle rigidity of Parkinson`s itself, where the beneficial effects of levodopa wane over time, producing so-called "off" times. When doctors looked at patients’ off times, they found amantadine decreased the duration by about 34 minutes per day compared to placebo recipients, which saw the duration of their unwanted movements increase by about 18 minutes

June 12, 2017
Reuters

How low to push blood sugar, and how to do it?

Growing evidence suggests that the method by which blood sugar is lowered may make a big difference in heart risk. That has raised a medical dilemma affecting tens of millions of people with type 2 diabetes — and for the doctors who treat them. At identical A1C levels, some drugs lowered risk, some did not change it — and some actually increased the chances of heart disease. Older and much cheaper diabetes medications, like metformin, have not been subjected to such tests, although they do have long and well established safety records. But whether they actually prevent heart problems is unknown

June 12, 2017
Deccan Herald

More than 2 billion people are overweight or obese, global study reveals

Globally, more than 2 billion children and adults suffer from health problems related to being overweight or obese, and an increasing percentage of people die from these health conditions, according to a new study. The study, which spans 195 countries and territories from 1980 through 2015, was released at the annual EAT Stockholm Food Forum, which aims to create a healthier, more sustainable food system. It is based on data from the most recent Global Burden of Disease study (GBD), a systematic, scientific effort to quantify the magnitude of health loss from all major diseases, injuries, and risk factors by age, sex, and population

June 12, 2017
Deutsche Welle, New York Times

Malaria Drug Shows Promise for Lou Gehrig's Disease

A drug used to combat malaria has shown great promise in the treatment of ALS (Lou Gehrig’s disease). The drug, pyrimethamine (Daraprim), has been used to treat malaria since 1953, but has recently been given a new look for curbing the levels of a toxic protein created by the gene mutation prevalent in ALS (amyotrophic lateral sclerosis) sufferers. Dale J. Lange, neurologist and principal researcher at HSS said “There is currently no cure for this devastating disease, but our study represents the first time a drug lowered a protein known to be relevant to disease progression; as such, a slowing of disease progression would be expected”

June 13, 2017
Newsline

U.S. youth tobacco use in 2016 fell by largest amount in 6 years

Youth tobacco use in the United States fell to historic lows in 2016, leading public health experts to speculate that a smoke-free generation may be within reach. The number of middle and high school students who used any tobacco product fell to 3.9 million in 2016 from 4.7 million in 2015, figures from the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention show, the first such decline since the CDC began reporting the measure in 2011

June 15, 2017
Reuters

State attorneys general probe opioid drug companies

A bipartisan group of state attorneys general are jointly investigating the marketing and sales practices of drug companies that manufacture opioid painkillers at the center of a national addiction epidemic. Attorneys general from states including Massachusetts, Texas, Illinois and Pennsylvania announced the investigation two weeks after Ohio Attorney General Mike DeWine sued five drug manufacturers for misrepresenting the risks of opioids. "We are looking into what role, if any, marketing and related practices might have played in the increasing prescription and use of these powerful and addictive drugs," District of Columbia Attorney General Karl Racine said

June 15, 2017
Reuters

Smog linked to bleeding stomach ulcers in elderly

Older adults may be more likely to have bleeding stomach ulcers on days when the air has higher levels of nitrogen dioxide, a pollutant produced by car exhaust and power plants, a recent study in Hong Kong suggests. The researchers focused on peptic ulcers, or painful sores lining the stomach or small intestine, which are often caused by bacterial infections but have also been linked to drinking, smoking and certain medications. Researchers examined whether short-term spikes in air pollution could also influence the risk of serious bleeds, and estimated a 7.6 percent increased risk of emergency admissions for bleeding peptic ulcers during five-day periods with higher average nitrogen dioxide levels

June 14, 2017
Reuters

India’s ballooning obesity and undernutrition issue: The health risks and remedies

More people are overweight in India than the combined populations of France, Spain and the United Kingdom, a study in the New England Journal of Medicine said. The number of overweight people almost doubled from 10.5% of the country’s population in 2006 to 19.6% in 2016, latest data shows. Anaemia has not shown a corresponding decline, affecting 53% women in 2016, down from 55.3% a decade ago. In comparison, 22.7% men were anaemic in 2016, as against 24.2% in 2006. This shows India is struggling with the twin burdens of chronic malnutrition and obesity

June 16, 2017
Hindustan Times

Exercise may stave off postpartum depression

Physical activity during and after pregnancy improves psychological wellbeing and may protect against postpartum depression, according to a new analysis of existing research. Even low-intensity exercise, such as walking with a baby stroller, was linked to a lower likelihood of depressive symptoms in new mothers, researchers found. “The negative consequences of postpartum depression not only affect the mother but also the child, who can suffer poor emotional and cognitive development,” said study co-author Celia Alvarez-Bueno of the University of Castilla-La Mancha in Cuenca, Spain

June 16, 2017
Reuters

Worldwide, more than 10 percent of young teens are smokers

Roughly 11 percent of youth aged 13 to 15 around the world use tobacco products like cigarettes and cigars, a global survey of students suggests. Tobacco use is the world’s leading cause of preventable death and serious illness, killing an estimated 6 million people each year, researchers note in the youth tobacco report from the U.S. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention. Most smokers take up the habit in their teens

June 16, 2017
Reuters

More liver cancer deaths could be averted in the U.S

Death rates from liver cancer in the U.S. have doubled since the 1980s and continue to rise, largely due to risk factors like hepatitis that should be the focus of better treatment and prevention efforts, researchers say. Despite improved survival rates overall, the rise in new diagnoses of liver cancer means that death rates are still increasing faster than for any other cancer type, the study team writes. “Large racial and socioeconomic disparities in liver cancer death rates still exist, reflecting differences in the prevalence of risk factors and, to some extent, inequalities in access to high quality care,” study author Kimberly Miller said

June 16, 2017
Reuters

Anti-diabetes drug also 'lessens kidney, heart disease' risk

An anti-diabetic drug that lowers blood sugar levels for type 2 diabetes sufferers also significantly cuts the risk of cardiovascular and kidney disease, according to a new study. The findings came in a clinical trial of more than 10,000 patients in 30 countries, using canagliflozin. It found the drug reduced the overall risk of cardiovascular disease by 14 percent and reduced the risk of heart failure hospitalization by 33 percent. It was also shown to have a significant impact -- 40 percent less -- on the progression of a serious kidney decline

June 14, 2017
Jakarta Post
June 13, 2017
Renal and Urology News, Alarabiya

Pre-eclampsia linked to heart disease risk

Women who suffer from gestational hypertension or pre-eclampsia are significantly at greater risk of future heart disease and should have their heart health monitored post-pregnancy, urge experts. The Heart Foundation says pregnancy is the `ultimate cardiac stress test` and pre-eclampsia, in particular, provides a window into the future heart complications a woman may face in the next decade. In Australia, 30,000 women each year will develop high blood pressure in pregnancy and 10,000 of these will have pre-eclampsia

June 14, 2017
Sky News Australia

Early-life exposure to famine increases risk of dyslipidemia in women, but not men

Exposure to severe famine as a foetus, or as an infant, significantly increases the chance of having dyslipidemia in adulthood, according to research published in the journal BMC Public Health. Analysis of the prevalence of dyslipidemia in 2,752 people who were exposed to the Chinese famine between 1959 and 1961, revealed that those who were in utero, or an infant during this period, were over 50% more likely to have dyslipidemia in adulthood. Taking gender into account, this association remained true for women, but not for men

June 13, 2017
Eurekalert

Study identifies possible earliest stage of Alzheimer’s disease

A study by the University of Southern California found elevated levels of amyloid plaque in the brain are the first signs in the earliest stage of Alzheimer’s. Researchers at the Keck School of Medicine at USC analysed 10 years of data and found that elevated levels of amyloid plaque, clusters of a sticky protein, found in normal cognitive functioning older adults may be the earliest stage of Alzheimer’s disease. Researchers found the elevated amyloid group was older and less educated, in addition to carrying at least one extra copy of the ApoE4 gene — increasing the odds for developing Alzheimer’s disease

June 13, 2017
Gephardt Daily News

Opioid Costs Push Struggling States to Dust Off Tobacco Strategy

State and local leaders fighting a worsening opioid-abuse epidemic are studying tactics used in the tobacco lawsuits of the 1990s, as they try to claw back billions from the companies who make and sell the powerful painkillers. More than 20 U.S. states, counties and cities have sued firms including Johnson & Johnson, Purdue Pharma Inc., and McKesson Corp. in the past year, claiming they fueled a public-health crisis with misleading marketing and aggressive distribution of opioids. Attorneys general in Alaska and Tennessee are also considering lawsuits as their health and legal budgets are stretched to a breaking point by the surge in addictions, overdoses and crime

June 14, 2017
Bloomberg

Scientists find new biomarker to guide cancer immunotherapy

Scientists said they have pinpointed a particular type of immune system cell that could predict more precisely if cancer patients are likely to respond to modern immunotherapy medicines. The discovery, reported in the journal Nature Immunology, suggests doctors and drug developers will need to get smarter in zeroing in on those people who stand to benefit from the expensive new drugs, which are revolutionizing cancer care. Drugs such as Merck & Co`s Keytruda, Bristol-Myers Squibb`s Opdivo, Roche`s Tecentriq and AstraZeneca`s Imfinzi can boost the immune system`s ability to fight tumors, but they only work for some patients

June 13, 2017
Reuters

Soft drink makers back product reformulation as ‘healthier’ than taxation

Governments can steer consumers towards healthier choices by supporting the reformulation of food ingredients, rather than imposing “discriminatory” taxes, according to the soft drinks industry. Product reformulation is in fact encouraged at European level. “One area which we are addressing at EU level is food reformulation to encourage reductions of sugar, salt and fats in processed foods,” said European Commissioner for Health and Food Safety Vytenis Andriukaitis recently. Last week, the EU’s 28 health ministers backed national initiatives aimed at reformulating foods in order to reduce levels of salt, saturated fat, trans-fatty acids, added sugar and energy density, given the role they play in the development of non-communicable diseases and weight problems

June 23, 2017
Euractiv

A peek into Bloomberg's new public health initiative

A total of 46 out of a goal of 50 cities have signed up to date to be part of “Partnership for Healthy Cities,” Bloomberg Philanthropies’ latest initiative launched just before the 70th World Health Assembly. The program will see the foundation investing up to $100,000 per partner city to help them in their efforts to implement one of 10 proven interventions in NCD and injury prevention. For the next 18 months, Bloomberg Philanthropies, in partnership with the World Health Organization and Vital Strategies, will be working with cities across the globe to tackle the different factors contributing to non-communicable diseases

June 23, 2017
Devex

WHO report finds dramatic increase in life-saving tobacco control policies in last decade

The latest WHO report on the global tobacco epidemic finds that more countries have implemented tobacco control policies, ranging from graphic pack warnings and advertising bans to no smoking areas. About 4.7 billion people – 63% of the world’s population – are covered by at least one comprehensive tobacco control measure, which has quadrupled since 2007 when only 1 billion people and 15% of the world’s population were covered

July 19, 2017
World Health Organization
July 20, 2017
Economic Times
July 19, 2017
News-Medical.net

Cardiovascular disease may help speed glaucoma progression

Cardiovascular disease is an important risk factor for rapid progression of glaucoma disease, regardless of IOP, according to a study. Looking at the clinical and visual field data of 11,254 eyes collected between 1991 and 2015, the authors of the study selected 54 eyes that satisfied the criteria for rapid progression. A total of 486 eyes were selected as non-rapid progressors for the control group. Patients with a cardiovascular history had double the chance to be rapid progressors as compared with controls

July 18, 2017
Healio.com

Tobacco companies interfere with health regulations, WHO

Cigarette manufacturers are attempting to thwart government tobacco controls wherever possible, even as governments make progress regulating the products, a new WHO report has found. World health officials also warn that tobacco companies have moved their fight to the developing world, where smoking rates are predicted to rise by double digits in the coming decades

July 19, 2017
The Guardian, Deutsche Welle
July 20, 2017
Economic Times
July 19, 2017
United Nations, Reuters

Cause of kidney disease in Narsinghpur still a mystery

Since 2010, hundreds of people in Badamba and Narsighpur blocks have lost their lives due to kidney diseases while a thousand others are suffering from acute renal problem in the region, but the reason behind the outbreak of the disease still remains a mystery. Since 2013, over 900 kidney patients have been traced out in Narsinghpur alone. However, the administration is yet to do any survey to find out the exact number of patients suffering from kidney disease in the region

July 14, 2017
Times of India

America Has a $27 Billion Sepsis Crisis

Sepsis is the top killer in U.S. hospitals, and the country has only recently begun to understand the scope of the problem. A new government report suggests that sepsis cases tripled in the decade from 2005 to 2014, causing 1.5 million hospital stays by the end of that period. That’s alarming, but it may be misleading, too. Experts who study sepsis say the apparent increase is actually a reflection of how doctors are getting better at identifying cases they used to miss

July 14, 2017
Bloomberg

Caribbean Calls for Reducing Economic Burden of NCDs

Chronic NCDs make a significant contribution to mortality and morbidity in the Caribbean and continue to represent an economic burden for most of the region`s countries. Addressing the latest meeting of the Conference of Heads of Government of the Caribbean Community, St Kitts and Nevis Prime Minister Dr Timothy Harris – who has responsibility for health in the organisation`s Quasi-Cabinet – called for urgent action to reverse the situation. Citing the findings of a 2016 study on the economic dimensions of NCDs in Trinidad and Tobago, Harris noted that an estimated 5 percent of that country’s GDP is being lost through the impact of preventable diabetes, hypertension and cancer

July 13, 2017
In-Depth News.net

New Study Deepens Understanding of HIV–Kidney Disease Link

Although advances in HIV treatment mean many people with the condition can achieve viral suppression and display no outward signs of illness, HIV is not a benign condition. Kidney disease is common in individuals with HIV, with about 30% of those infected experiencing it. A new Dutch study sheds further light on the relationship between HIV and kidney impairment, highlighting the particular risks faced by the middle-aged and older HIV-positive population

July 13, 2017
Contagion Live

Dementia and Alzheimer’s main cause of death for women, says Public Health England

Alzheimer’s disease and dementia are the biggest cause of death among women, according to a government report on the state of the nation’s health. Women can expect to live nearly a quarter of their lives in ill-health and men a fifth. The causes of death have shifted since the turn of the century, with the rise in deaths from dementia and Alzheimer’s the most significant features – alongside declines in other diseases

July 13, 2017
The Guardian

T-cell cancer therapy holds promise, longer-term results await

A novel cell treatment that saved the life of 9-year-old Austin Schuetz was given the green light by U.S. regulatory advisers and doctors hope it can save the lives of more children with the most common type of childhood cancer. An advisory committee to the U.S. Food and Drug Administration voted unanimously to recommend approval of Novartis AG’s tisagenlecleucel for treating B-cell acute lymphoblastic leukaemia in children and young adults who relapsed or failed chemotherapy

July 13, 2017
Reuters
July 12, 2017
Reuters

Inside Philip Morris’ campaign to subvert the global anti-smoking treaty

The world’s largest publicly traded tobacco company is deploying its vast resources against international efforts to reduce smoking. Internal documents uncovered by Reuters reveal details of the secret operation. Reuters has found that Philip Morris International is running a secretive campaign to block or weaken treaty provisions that save millions of lives by curbing tobacco use. In an internal document, the company says it supported the enactment of the treaty. But Philip Morris has come to view it as a “regulatory runaway train” driven by “anti-tobacco extremists” – a description contained in the document

July 13, 2017
Reuters, Business Insider

Higher risk for celiac disease in diabetic children

Celiac disease is more common in young people with type 1 diabetes than in diabetes-free kids, although how often the two conditions occur together varies in different countries, a new study finds. “Celiac disease is not uncommon in type 1 diabetes, and regular screening is important,” the study’s lead author Dr. Maria Craig, from UNSW Medicine in Kensington, New South Wales, Australia, said

July 28, 2017
Reuters

Insulin resistance linked to lower bone density

Decreasing sensitivity to insulin - often associated with obesity and eventual type 2 diabetes - may also cause young adults to have lower bone mass at a time of life when it should be at its peak, Korean researchers say. With insulin resistance, the body is less effective at using the hormone to get blood sugar into cells for energy, which leads to rising insulin levels. About 40 percent of bone mass is developed by the late teens, 90 percent by age 18 and peak lifetime bone mass is reached by the late 20s, the study team notes

July 25, 2017
Reuters

HbA1c, Plasma Glucose Linked to Alzheimer's in Diabetes

For patients with type 2 diabetes mellitus, fasting plasma glucose visit-to-visit variation, represented by the coefficient of variation, and haemoglobin A1c CV are independently associated with Alzheimer`s disease, according to a study published in Diabetes Care. Researchers included 16,706 patients with T2DM in the National Diabetes Care Management Program who were age 60 years or more and without diagnosis of AD. The authors sought to examine the correlation between glycaemic variability and incidence of AD. The researchers identified 831 incident cases of AD during a median follow-up of 8.88 years, with a crude incidence rate of 3.5/1,000 person-years

July 28, 2017
Neurology Advisor

Occupational pesticide and herbicide exposure tied to lung disease

Workers exposed to pesticides and herbicides on the job may be more likely than other people to develop chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD), bronchitis and other breathing problems, an Australian study suggests. With any herbicide exposure at work, people were more than twice as likely to develop COPD by middle age, and workplace pesticide exposure was associated with 74 percent higher odds of the common lung disease

July 28, 2017
Reuters

FDA plans to reduce nicotine in cigarettes to non-addictive levels

Nicotine levels in cigarettes could be reduced to non-addictive levels, according to new plans set out by the US regulatory body. The Food and Drug Administration announced a roadmap to reduce deaths from tobacco, and tobacco-related disease. According to the body, more than 480,000 deaths in the US are caused by tobacco every year

July 28, 2017
The Guardian

FDA Delays Rules That Would Have Limited E-Cigarettes on Market

Electronic-cigarette makers won a major reprieve when the FDA delayed regulations that could have removed many of their products from the market and opened the door to endorsing e-cigarettes as a means to get smokers to quit. The FDA commissioner, Dr. Scott Gottlieb, announced the delay as part of a broad plan to reduce tobacco deaths in the US

July 28, 2017
New York Times

Hypertension is the silent killer disease spreading across an Africa that isn’t ready

A survey in four countries: Burkina Faso, Ghana, Kenya and South Africa, looked at both rural areas and the peri-urban settings in the cities of Nairobi and Johannesburg, and showed that hypertension is a critical health problem in Africa. There are stark differences in the prevalence, awareness and control of high blood pressure on the continent. Ultimately there is a need for regionally tailored intervention

July 24, 2017
QZ Africa

Study to identify genetic risk of kidney diseases

A study to determine the genetic risk of kidney diseases caused by diabetes is currently under way. The results could help doctors screen patients more effectively and give them early treatment. The $25 million research study is the latest programme to be funded under the health and biomedical sciences domain of the $19 billion Research, Innovation and Enterprise (RIE) 2020 plan. It aims to determine the underlying genes and process of how kidney diseases caused by diabetes develop

July 22, 2017
Straits Times

CDC: More than 100 Million U.S. Adults Have Diabetes

While the rate of new diabetes cases is steady, a report released by the CDC shows that a third of adults in the United States currently are living with diabetes or prediabetes. The National Diabetes Statistics Report found that as of 2015, 30.3 million Americans are living with diagnosed diabetes and another 84.1 million have prediabetes, a condition that if left untreated leads to diabetes within five years

July 20, 2017
UPI.com, EHS Today, Drug Store News

Heart attack patients missing out on smoking cessation drugs

For a new study, researchers analysed data on 9,193 smokers who had a heart attack between 2007 and 2013. All were at least 65 years old. Overall, 97 percent of patients were counselled during their hospital stay about smoking cessation, but only 7 percent ended up picking up medications to help achieve that goal within 90 days

July 21, 2017
Reuters

Death toll from respiratory diseases rising in Gurgaon amid soaring pollution

The number of deaths from respiratory ailments being reported by hospitals in Gurgaon is rising year-on-year with the city`s consistently high levels of air pollution seen as the exacerbating factor. According to the data collected by TOI, 2,500 people admitted to five leading private hospitals in the city died in the last one year — from April 2016 to March 2017 — because of respiratory illnesses in which air pollution was an aggravating factor

July 21, 2017
Times of India

Two key CKD biomarkers predict risk for future peripheral artery disease

Among patients without symptomatic peripheral artery disease at baseline, a lower estimated glomerular filtration rate and higher urinary albumin to creatinine ratio — even when not rising to the level of albuminuria — significantly increase the risk for developing future vascular disease, according to findings from a large meta-analysis of international prospective cohorts

July 21, 2017
Healio.com

An emerging strategy to tackle chronic disease

In many countries around the globe, both developed and developing, tertiary hospitals in city centers are overwhelmed by an influx of patients who might be better served with preventative or primary medical care. The mismatch is symptomatic of a growing shift in global health, away from infectious diseases and toward non-communicable diseases such as cancer and heart disease. NCDs are likely to be the key challenge of the future, and for now they are being treated in a system that wasn’t built to address them. Experts and practitioners are beginning to piece together a strategy involving stronger and more integrated health systems

July 12, 2017
Devex.com

Nanoparticle delivery tech targets rare lung disease

Researchers at London, UK-based Imperial College are developing a technology to transport drugs directly to the lungs of pulmonary arterial hypertension (PAH) patients. The technology consists of ethanol-heated iron and trans-trans muconic acid nanoparticles that can be small drug actives. These particles can be delivered directly to the site of the disease, according to researchers, who said the approach bypassed the toxicity issues that have held back development of less targeted, systemic nanomedicines

July 10, 2017
in-pharmatechnologist.com
July 3, 2017
Phys.Org

Lifestyle illnesses reach tribals too: Study

A two-year study by a professor from a Chennai-based government-run epidemiological department has revealed that both urban and rural areas of India are undergoing an epidemiological transformation and the nation will soon face a huge burden of non-communicable diseases. The findings are based on a study conducted by Professor Vijayaprasad Gopichandran from the Katkari tribe of Raigad district. They show prevalence of 16.8 per cent hypertension and 7.3 per cent diabetes among tribe members who were observed and tested over a period of two years

June 27, 2017
Asian Age

Too many children are sun tanned because parents are increasingly abandoning sun cream, NHS Engl...

Health experts claim that a golden glow may be more harmful than it appears as they warn that too many children are becoming sun tanned because parents are increasingly abandoning sun cream. NHS England said the findings showed a "worryingly relaxed attitude" towards sun care among the parents of young children, highlighting the fact that one in ten parents of children aged 2-7 admitting they have encouraged them to sunbathe. The study, of 1,000 parents with children aged 11 and under, found that more than a fifth do not apply any sunscreen on their child until they are visibly starting to burn

June 27, 2017
Telegraph, BBC

Merck heart drug surprises with positive result; questions linger

Merck & Co said its experimental cholesterol drug from a class with a history of consistent failure lowered deaths and heart attacks in a large trial, but the company has yet to decide whether to seek approval despite the surprise success. The drug maker reported only that the drug, anacetrapib, met the main goal in the 4-year trial of about 30,000 high-risk heart patients already on cholesterol-lowering statins. It showed a statistically significant reduction in the combined risk of heart attacks, heart-related death and need for repeat artery-clearing procedures

June 27, 2017
Reuters

Fewer admissions for heart failure, but blacks still fare worse than whites

Between 2002 and 2013, hospital admissions for heart failure fell by nearly a third in the U.S., but blacks are still more than twice as likely as whites to be hospitalized for the condition, researchers say. “These findings are impressive and suggest that efforts to prevent heart failure and improve the outpatient treatment of heart failure have had overall success in reducing the number of heart failure patients needing hospitalizations,” senior study author Dr. Gregg C. Fonarow said. “However, the improvements were not equally distributed across race/ethnicities and genders, and additional efforts are needed.”

June 27, 2017
Reuters

40 Million Death Per Year Due to Non Communicable Disease : WHO

Non-communicable diseases are the result of a combination of genetic, physiological, environmental and behaviours factors. Cardiovascular diseases are the most prominent factors for causing the maximum deaths (17 million), followed by cancers (8.8-million), respiratory diseases (3.9-million), and diabetes (1.6-million). These four groups of diseases account for over 80 per cent of all premature NCD deaths. NCDs disproportionately affect people in low and middle income countries where more than three quarters of global NCD deaths – 31 million – occur

June 27, 2017
Newsgram
June 26, 2017
b-live.in

Preventable Deaths Surge in the U.S.

More than 130,000 Americans are killed annually by preventable causes, and the number has been climbing at a faster rate recently because of opioid abuse and car crashes involving drivers distracted by mobile devices. The death count jumped more than 7 percent in 2015 to about 146,600, according to a report by the National Safety Council. Vehicle mishaps and poisonings, driven by opioid abuse, killed more than 80,000 people combined in 2015. Preventable accidents cost society about $850 billion a year, according to the group

June 27, 2017
Bloomberg

Whole genome sequencing not ready for routine use: study

A study testing the value of DNA sequencing as part of routine medical care showed that roughly one in five people carried a mutation linked with rare disease, but few actually benefited from that information, researchers reported. The finding comes from the first rigorous study examining the impact of whole genome sequencing in healthy primary care patients. Scientists for years have predicted that a person`s DNA would eventually become part of every patient`s medical chart. The new study, published in the Annals of Internal Medicine, put that notion to the test

June 26, 2017
Reuters

Novo Nordisk says obesity drug helps up to 13.8 percent weight loss in phase 2 trial

Danish drugmaker Novo Nordisk said a phase 2 trial for its big hope in tackling obesity, an improved GLP-1 drug called semaglutide, showed a weight loss of up to 13.8 percent in people with severe conditions. The clinical trial, which lasted a year and included 957 people, resulted in a weight loss up to 17.8 kg after 52 weeks of treatment with semaglutide from a mean baseline weight of around 111 kg and a body mass index of around 39, Novo said. That corresponded to an estimated weight loss of 13.8 percent compared to the 2.3 percent achieved by diet, exercise and placebo alone

June 23, 2017
Reuters

Hitting cardiovascular health targets can help elderly live longer

Meeting some or all of the American Heart Association’s seven ideal cardiovascular health goals is associated with longer life and fewer heart attacks and strokes, no matter your age. Gaye and colleagues analysed whether achieving some or all of the American Heart Association seven “ideal” goals – “Life’s Simple 7” - would affect people’s risk of dying or having a stroke or heart attack during a specific study period. Compared to people who meet no more than two of the goals, in those who met three or four the risk of death during the study was reduced by 16 percent, and meeting five to seven goals cut the risk by 29 percent

June 23, 2017
Reuters

New ethical lapses alleged in controversial India cervical cancer screening trial

A long-debated study aimed at validating a low-cost way to screen for cervical cancer in India has come under fire again, based on new evidence of ethical lapses contained in documents obtained through the U.S. Freedom of Information Act. Critics of the 18-year trial said that U.S.-funded Indian researchers used ineffective screening that endangered thousands of poor women in Mumbai. They were told the test could help prevent cancer, but far fewer pre-cancerous lesions were found than expected, suggesting that some lesions were missed — possibly leading to an unknown number of deaths. The trial should have been stopped years earlier for another reason, critics said: Other research had already shown that the screening method worked when properly applied, making it unethical to use an unscreened control group

June 23, 2017
statnews.com

More blood but no victory as Philippine drug war marks its first year

President Rodrigo Duterte`s brutal war on drugs has resulted in thousands of deaths, yet the street price of crystal methamphetamine in Manila has fallen and surveys show Filipinos are as anxious as ever about crime. Most victims of Duterte’s war are small-time users and dealers, while the masterminds behind the lucrative drug trade are largely unknown and at large, say critics of Duterte`s ruthless methods. If the strategy was working the laws of economics suggest the price of crystal meth should be rising as less supply hits the streets. But the Philippine Drug Enforcement Agency`s own data suggests it has become even cheaper in Manila

June 25, 2017
trust.org

Heart-healthy goals tied to lower blood pressure among blacks

Black Americans may be able to lower their risk for high blood pressure by following the seven heart-healthy steps laid out by the American Heart Association (AHA), according to a new study. The AHA`s "Life`s Simple 7" program focuses on seven goals: a healthy weight, a healthy diet, healthy physical activity levels, quitting smoking, and good control of blood pressure, blood sugar and cholesterol. The risk of high blood pressure decreased as the number of heart healthy habits followed by black Americans increased, researchers found

June 26, 2017
Reuters

Vaping teens more likely to take up regular cigarettes

Adolescents and young adults who try e-cigarettes are more than three times as likely to take up smoking traditional cigarettes as their peers who haven`t tried the devices, a research review suggests. "E-cigarette use among teens and young adults could increase the future burden of tobacco by creating a new generation of adult smokers who might have otherwise not begun smoking," said lead study author Samir Soneji

June 26, 2017
Reuters

High NCD concerns among children

A high number of students are suffering from Non-Communicable Diseases forcing stakeholders of the education system to rethink the delivery of its physical education programs. Speaking at a workshop on Quality Physical Education today, Minister for Education, Heritage and Arts Dr Mahendra Reddy said stakeholders needed to place children at the centre of learning. “Our children all over the world are falling prey to junk food and poor eating and lifestyle habits which are affecting their growth and development," he was quoted saying in a Government statement

June 28, 2017
Fiji Times

Family-led rehabilitation ineffective for stroke patients, says Lancet study

Family-led rehabilitation is ineffective for stroke patients, a recent study has found. The study titled — ‘family-led rehabilitation after stroke in India’ — published in The Lancet is based on one of the largest stroke rehabilitation trials that was conducted at 14 centres across India, following up 1,250 stroke patients over six months

June 28, 2017
Hindustan Times

Scottish study strengthens link between high BMI, cardiometabolic disease risk

New research adds to existing evidence that there’s an association between high body mass index and an increased risk of cardiometabolic diseases like hypertension, coronary heart disease and type 2 diabetes. The study, published in JAMA Cardiology, was randomized using the mendelian method. Results showed that when adjusted for age, sex, alcohol intake and smoking history, higher BMI was linked to an increased risk of coronary heart disease, hypertension and type 2 diabetes, as well as increased systolic and diastolic blood pressure

July 7, 2017
Cardiovascular Business

France to become one of priciest countries in Europe for smokers

France will raise the price of cigarettes to 10 euros (£8.8) a pack within three years, the health minister said, confirming a strategy that will push tobacco costs to among the highest in Europe. At present, a packet of 20 cigarettes costs roughly 7 euros in France, well below the roughly 10 euros charged in Britain and Ireland. "France is one of the slowest learners in the world on smoking," the minister, Agnes Buzyn, said. "Big price rises will be needed to have an impact on public health"

July 6, 2017
Reuters

Dutch bank bans loans to tobacco industry on health grounds

The decision by ABN Amro, which has six millions customers worldwide, is the first by a major bank in The Netherlands. The bank’s decision came as it announced a new partnership with the National Heart Foundation in the fight against smoking, which kills some 20,000 people every year in the country of 17 million. The move also stops any new investment in the tobacco industry

July 6, 2017
The Guardian

SGLT2 inhibitors help reduce high blood pressure, study reports

A group of oral medications given to people with type 2 diabetes have been found to help reduce high blood pressure. A research team from China, South Africa and Iran looked at 43 random trials which had involved 22,428 people. As well as high blood pressure, they examined how SGLT2 inhibitors affected health markers including cholesterol and triglycerides. SGLT2 inhibitor therapy was shown to significantly reduce blood pressure throughout the studies

July 7, 2017
Diabetes.co.uk

Study: Low iron levels may increase heart disease risk

A recent study at University College London found low iron levels may increase a person`s risk of developing heart disease. Previous research has shown that iron status, the amount of iron in the body, is linked to cardiovascular disease risk. Researchers have struggled in the past to show a direct link and have often had conflicting results. The current study, published in the journal Arteriosclerosis, Thrombosis, and Vascular Biology, used genetic variations as a proxy for iron status showing that having a high iron status can reduce the risk of CVD and, conversely, low iron status can increase the risk

July 10, 2017
UPI.com

Biogen MS drug hit by EU safety restriction

Biogen’s Zinbryta multiple sclerosis drug has suffered a serious setback after European regulators restricted its use because of liver safety concerns. The European Medicines Agency said its safety experts have provisionally restricted use of Zinbryta (daclizumab) to MS patients with highly active relapsing disease that have failed to respond to other treatments, and to patients with rapidly evolving disease who cannot be treated with other drugs. Experts from the EMA’s Pharmacovigilance Risk Assessment Committee also said that patients with liver injury must not be given Zinbryta

July 10, 2017
PharmaPhorum.com

Government to improve treatment of non-communicable diseases

One in every four adults in Uganda suffers from a non-communicable disease, according to a survey. With the increasing rate of NCDs in the country, the government has signed a deal with Novartis Access to increase patients’ access to treatment. The permanent secretary ministry of health, Dr. Diana Atwine said the first set of drugs includes valsartan, amlodipine for treatment of hypertension and heart failure, vildagliptin for diabetes and amoxicillin dispersible tablets for treatment of respiratory infections

July 10, 2017
New Vision

Sleep apnea linked to worsening diabetic eye disease

People with both sleep apnea and type 2 diabetes have more than double the risk of worsening retina disease compared to diabetics without the sleep breathing disorder, a UK study suggests. "Patients with type 2 diabetes and obstructive sleep apnea (OSA) are at increased risk of developing advanced retinopathy and also are at increased risk of greater decline in kidney function, as we found in a previous publication,” senior study author Dr. Abd A. Tahrani from University of Birmingham said

July 6, 2017
Reuters

Resistance exercise may help stave off heart, diabetes risks

Middle aged adults who do even a small amount of regular strength training exercise may be lowering their risk of so-called metabolic syndrome - itself a risk factor for both heart disease and diabetes, a recent study suggests. People with at least three unfavourable health stats from a list that includes large waist size, high blood pressure or triglycerides, high blood sugar or low “good” cholesterol are said to have metabolic syndrome, and are at increased risk of going on to develop diabetes, heart disease or both

July 6, 2017
Reuters

Researchers discover atomic structure of suspect Alzheimer proteins

Scientists have for the first time revealed the atomic structure of the tau protein filaments that tangle in the brains of Alzheimer`s patients and say it should point the way towards developing new treatments for the disease. Using a technique known as cryo-electron microscopy, a team from Britain`s Medical Research Council Laboratory of Molecular Biology mapped in fine detail the tau filaments extracted from the brain of a patient who had died with Alzheimer`s

July 5, 2017
Reuters

Personalized vaccines hold cancer at bay in two early trials

A novel class of personalized cancer vaccines, tailored to the tumours of individual patients, kept disease in check in two early-stage clinical trials, pointing to a new way to help the immune system fight back. Although so-called immunotherapy drugs from the likes of Merck and Co, Bristol-Myers Squibb and Roche are starting to revolutionize cancer care, they still only work for a limited number of patients. By adding a personalized cancer vaccine, scientists believe it should be possible to improve substantially the effectiveness of such immune-boosting medicines

July 5, 2017
Reuters

Robot wars: knee surgery marks new battleground for companies

The world`s top medical technology companies are turning to robots to help with complex knee surgery, promising quicker procedures and better results in operations that often leave patients dissatisfied. Demand for artificial replacement joints is growing fast, as baby boomers` knees and hips wear out, but for the past 15 years rival firms have failed to deliver a technological advance to gain them significant market share. Now Stryker and Smith & Nephew believe that is about to change, as robots give them an edge, with less trauma to patients and faster recovery, although they still need to prove themselves in definitive clinical studies

July 6, 2017
Reuters

European scientists develop new handheld scanner for early-stage heart disease diagnosis

With worldwide cardiovascular deaths at an all-time high, European scientists have developed a new handheld scanner that can read your heart`s vital signs like a supermarket barcode reader can scan items at the checkout, allowing a GP to diagnose even preclinical patients for the early onset of a disease. Employing `Laser Doppler Vibrometry`, a technique using photonics technology, the device can pick up vital information about the status of the heart using light, in a fast and inexpensive way

July 6, 2017
News-mediacal.net
July 5, 2017
Sci-News.com

Chandigarh: Health department seeks central funds to screen patients

The Chandigarh health department, which has set up non-communicable disease (NCD) clinics at four major hospitals in the city, has asked for funds from the Union Ministry of Health to start screening patients aged 30 years and above under the National Programme for Prevention and Control of Cancer, Diabetes, Cardiovascular Diseases and Stroke (NPCDCS). “We have sought Rs 14 lakh to run the programme properly,” said a senior health official, adding that the department hoped to get funds for the programme soon

June 11, 2017
Indian Express

Africa must reboot its health systems to cope with non-communicable diseases

It is estimated that there will be well over 3m deaths from these diseases in Africa by 2020. The rising burden will hit health, economic productivity and the social fabric of societies. What is needed is an approach that upgrades quality and efficiency of the healthcare interventions currently in place. It requires information on gaps in the healthcare system so policymakers know how best to help

May 21, 2017
Econotimes

Gutka freely available in Tamil Nadu despite ban: Study

A recent ban on gutka products in the state has not taken them off the shelves but only made them more expensive, a new study says. More than 90% of smokeless tobacco users have no difficulty in procuring banned gutka products but pay double the price to buy it. Cancers linked to tobacco cause hundreds of thousands of deaths each year and are a huge economic burden on the state. This represents 1.16% of the GDP and one-third of these deaths are preventable

May 21, 2017
Times of India

AMA commits to international effort to reduce non-communicable diseases

Accra has joined the Partnership for Healthy Cities to reduce non-communicable diseases and injuries in communities by December 2018. Participating cities receive a seed grant of up to 100,000 dollars and technical assistance to accelerate the implementation of a proven intervention to prevent NCDs and injuries. Accra chose to implement increasing seat-belt and helmet use to improve road safety

May 21, 2017
Ghana Web

NCDs: Answer lies in early screening, prevention

The New Times Rwanda takes an in-depth look at how the Rwandan health authorities in the Gaghengeri Sector, Rwamagana District, are starting to use early screening and diagnosis to tackle the emerging burden of non-communicable diseases, which are threatening to overwhelm the healthcare system

May 22, 2017
New Times Rwanda

Smoking 'Light' cigarettes may increase lung cancer risk

A new study indicates that smokers using ‘light cigarettes,` for their lower levels of tar or nicotine, need think again. They are at an increased risk of developing a certain form of lung cancer that develops deep in the lungs, adenocarcinoma. The claims by cigarette manufacturers that they are safer are just plain wrong, as the holes in the cigarette filters mean smokers inhale more smoke

May 22, 2017
Business Standard

Overweight boys at risk of bowel cancer

A new Danish study said overweight boys may be at a greater risk of bowel cancer when they grow up, however, if they shed the kilos and achieve a healthy weight by young adulthood, the risk is nullified, the research team concluded. The study looked at 61,000 Danish schoolboys between 1939 and 1959 to examine how changes to BMI from childhood to adulthood are associated with the risk of colon cancer in later life

May 22, 2017
Sky News , Economic Times

Thiruvananthapuram: Lifestyle diseases make dengue-hit vulnerable

The state has close to a 20% diabetic population which is also susceptible to vector borne diseases. The Deccan Chronicle suggests ‘lifestyle diseases are inversely proportionate to resistance to infections which compounds the dengue problem.’ Higher cholesterol, sugar levels and blood pressure may lower the resistance of people across the state to dengue, thus, increasing the risk of morbidity and mortality due to fever

May 20, 2017
Deccan Chronicle

Pro-tobacco group takes prime space to praise govt crackdown on NGOs

An Indian NGO called the Federation of All India Farmer Association (FIFA) describes itself as ‘a non-profit federation whose mission is to support the farming community in India and create a sustainable future for farmers.’ In its latest ad hoarding campaign it has taken billboards outside the Health Ministry praising the action of the ministry in taking action against some NGOs, which it says take foreign cash and who pressurise Indian farmers. In this case it is backing the action of the ministry in moving against Public Health Foundation of India for allegedly lobbying against tobacco and violating foreign funding norms

May 20, 2017
Indian Express

Draft Cancer Resolution Might Be Set For Approval At World Health Assembly

According to sources, countries have agreed in the nick of time on a draft resolution on cancer prevention, control and access to cancer medicines, and in particular, the price of new cancer medicines, to be examined at the World Health Assembly. If the resolution passes there will be a technical report for January 2019 looking at pricing approaches, including transparency, the impact of availability and affordability for medicines for the prevention and treatment of cancer

May 19, 2017
IP-Watch

Scientists to test whether Zika can kill brain cancer cells

Scientists in Britain plan to harness the Zika virus to try to kill brain tumour cells in experiments they say could lead to new ways to fight an aggressive type of cancer. The research will focus on glioblastoma, the most common form of brain cancer, which has a five-year survival rate of barely five percent

May 18, 2017
Reuters
May 20, 2017
Xinhuanet, Pulse Nigeria

With mental health problems, fitness is tied to reduced risk of death

With the prevalence of mental health issues, people are facing many stressors in their daily lives stimulating feelings of depression, anxiety and other mental disorders. Medication to treat these mental problems is not only expensive but comes with side effects such as weight gain. Researchers found that higher levels of cardiovascular fitness helped people cope better with emotional distress meaning they were less likely to die

May 19, 2017
Reuters

Philippines' tough public smoking ban gets broad support

A Philippine ban on smoking in public places received broad support as anti-tobacco activists hailed it as a victory and some smokers said they were now prepared to kick the habit. Even the industry lobby group, the Philippine Tobacco Institute said it supported the regulation and acknowledged the health objectives

May 19, 2017
Reuters

Scientists develop flexible DNA-barcoding test to detect cancer

Researchers say a new test based on tumour cell DNA in the blood suggest the possibility of a better, more accurate method for detecting cancer before a tumour is visible via imaging methods such as MRI

May 22, 2017
UPI.com

Diabetes drug may work by changing gut bacteria makeup

Researchers looked into the most successful treatment for type 2 diabetes and found that it seems to work by changing the makeup of the gut bacteria. Metformin is commonly prescribed to help people with type 2 diabetes control their blood sugar. It is believed to work by reducing the amount of glucose made in the liver, which in turn lowers blood sugar levels. Researchers discovered that the drug seems to encourage the growth of strains of bacteria called Akkermansia and Bifidobacterium and this seems to influence blood sugar levels. Researchers believe more investigation of these findings may be necessary

May 22, 2017
New Scientist

Non-communicable diseases: Serious health concerns

In an opinion article for The Himalayan Times the publication calls on the government to target existing human resources and re-equip them in order to help promote health and prevent disease across Nepal. It argues that if the country is able to harness the potential that its primary healthcare offers, it can become a vital platform for a concerted response to the growing problem of non-communicable diseases

May 23, 2017
Himalayan Times

When western lifestyle diseases migrate south

An article which was originally published in Le Monde Diplomatique discusses how diseases traditionally associated with the lifestyle of the developed world, especially diabetes and cardiovascular disease, have migrated south, and now, by 2030, experts believe they may kill more people in Africa than communicable diseases such as HIV/Aids, if no action is taken to urgently remedy the situation

May 23, 2017
Equal Times

How do we choose who gets the flu vaccine in a pandemic – paramedics, prisoners or the public?...

The Conversation blog discusses how policymakers need to have functioning plans in place for a pandemic so they able to take critical decision, such as which parts of society get vaccinated, as a priority and which parts do not, so that health authorities ensure structured planning to manage and overcome a pandemic

May 23, 2017
The Conversation

Foot mat may help predict who will get a common diabetes complication

An experimental foot-temperature monitoring system might one day be able to detect when diabetic patients are developing foot ulcers, a common complication that can lead to infections and amputations, a small study suggests. Researchers tested a smart mat designed to use variations in temperature at different points on the foot as a predictor of recurring foot ulcers in 129 patients who had this problem before. Skin temperatures typically increase as ulcers develop

May 24, 2017
Reuters

Trump Wants to Slash Funding for Birth Defect Research as States Brace for Zika Season

The Trump administration wants to slash the Centers for Disease Control budget by 17%, including cutting programmes such as the National Center on Birth Defects and Development Disabilities, an initiative which is essential for zika research. With the funds initially earmarked to deal with the zika crisis now nearly all spent, such cuts would stymie the ability of state and local authorities to prepare for inevitable new infections or provide services to those affected by them

May 24, 2017
Gizmodo

The global alcohol business is expanding in Africa and that’s bad news for health

The alcohol industry is under pressure and needs to develop new sources of growth and profit; developed world markets are close to saturation so expansion into developing economies is the new play with the $103bn merger between SAB Miller and AB InBev a good reference point. As a result, exposure to alcohol in African countries is expected to increase in the next few years and with it come alcohol-related health and social problems

May 25, 2017
Quartz Africa

Red meat tied to higher risk of dying from many diseases

Eating more red meat is associated with an increased risk of dying from eight common diseases, including cancer, diabetes and heart disease, as well as all other causes of death, according to a recent study. Researchers examined data on almost 537,000 adults aged 50 to 71 and found that people who consumed the most red meat had a 26% higher chance of dying from a variety of causes than those who ate the least. People who ate most white meat, including poultry and fish, were 25% less likely to die of all causes, than people who consumed the least, researchers reported in the BMJ

May 25, 2017
Reuters

German court favors vaccination of child in parents' dispute

Germany’s highest court ruled on Tuesday that a father could have his child vaccinated, according to a schedule recommended by authorities, even though the mother of the girl is opposed. The decision comes as government and health organizations in Europe try to reverse a fall in vaccination rates that has led to outbreaks of highly contagious and potentially deadly diseases such as measles

May 23, 2017
Reuters

Time to act against NCDs is now

Melvin D’Souza, Corporate Vice President and General Manager, Novo Nordisk India, writes an opinion article for Health Economic Times in which he calls for urgent action to tackle the growing non-communicable disease problem that the world is facing. Referencing the WHO Global Status Report on NCDs 2014, he highlights the particular urgency of this issue for India, because it shares more than two-thirds of the total deaths due to NCDs across the whole of the South-East Region of WHO

May 23, 2017
Economic Times

World No Tobacco Day: Smoking robs your wallet, health – Cansa

Cansa South Africa said over 20% of cancer deaths worldwide are due to tobacco and that cigarettes cause over 18 types of cancer. It is not just the smoker who increases the risk of disease, but also people exposed to second hand smoke. Cansa said ‘the tobacco industry produces and markets products that kill millions prematurely. It robs household finances of cash that could have been used for food and education and imposes healthcare costs on families, communities and countries"

May 22, 2017
Boksburg Advertiser

Kenya: Time for Holistic Approach to Diabetes

The CEO of MP Shah Hospital, Nairobi, writes an opinion article for Daily Nation in which he calls on people to adopt a holistic approach to tackling one of Kenya’s biggest killers, diabetes. He points out that it leads to complications in many parts of the body and increases the risk of dying prematurely. He calls for screening for risk, diets tailored to healthier foods, increased levels of awareness and exercise, so that risk can be better managed

May 22, 2017
allafrica.com, Daily Nation, Daily Nation

Number of university dropouts due to mental health problems trebles

Data from the UK Higher Education Statistics Agency reveals that a record 1,180 students experience mental health problems and left university early in 2014-2015, the most recent year data is available. It represents a 210% increase from the 380 students who did so in 2009-10. The figures have prompted charities, counsellors and health experts to urge higher education institutions to ensure the right support for students is in place

May 23, 2017
The Guardian

Novo Nordisk looks to expand Latin American obesity business

Novo Nordisk wants to expand its obesity business in Latin America on the back of its successful anti-obesity injection product called Saxenda. The company has aready begun launching Saxenda in Latin America ahead of other markets and it will now increase its capacity and expand in those markets. One country identified as a key market by Novo Nordisk is Mexico

May 22, 2017
Reuters

Kenya seeks to tackle rising cases of hypertension

Kenya’s health ministry said it has developed a training module for non-communicable diseases for community health volunteers as part of its efforts to tackle rising cases of hypertension in the country. Around 20m Kenyans have never tested their blood pressure levels despite the nationwide increase of hypertension cases which are potentially leading to a social explosion in kidney disease, heart disease or strokes

May 18, 2017
xinhuanet

Philippines' Duterte gets tough on tobacco with ban on smoking in public

President Duterte signed an executive order banning smoking in public across the second-most populous country in Southeast Asia, one of the region’s strictest anti-tobacco laws. The ban which covers a maximum penalty of four months in jail, covers both indoor and outdoor smoking. It also covers existing bans on tobacco advertisements, promotions or sponsorships

May 18, 2017
Reuters

NHS could save £67 million a year if smoking rates cut

Cancer Research UK said the NHS would save some £67m a year if the UK can cut by half the number of people who smoke. The UK is projected to have a smoking rate of 10% by 2035, with a marked difference between the most deprived groups (15% of whom are expected to smoke) and the wealthiest (whose rate is expected to be just 2.5%). Cutting the rate to 5% nationally by 2035 would save millions in direct NHS and social care costs but also £548m in additional revenue

May 16, 2017
Pharma Times

Segregated neighborhoods may influence blood pressure

African-Americans who move from segregated neighbourhoods to more racially diverse communities might experience improvements in their blood pressure, a U.S. study suggests. The authors say the findings are interesting as they point to the important role that social policy can have on health 

May 15, 2017
Reuters

Vietnam has burden of non communicable diseases

Vietnam’s Deputy Health Minister said that of every ten deaths, seven are caused by cardiovascular disease, diabetes, cancer and pulmonary diseases. Non-communicable diseases cause 73% of all deaths and 40% of these people are dying before the age of 70. The financial burden of these diseases will cost the country $47bn over the next 20 years. Vietnam also bears a further cost of $1bn in tobacco-related diseases. Vietnam is committing to intensifying prevention but also propagating more information about the risks and investing in earlier detection

May 15, 2017
Vietnam.net

Workers are going deaf and some are dying, working in this city’s factories

Star2 reports on the Indian textile hub of Surat on how many migrants from places like Odisha come to the city to work on the power looms in such appalling conditions that it often damages their hearing and ruins their health. Textiles workers are exposed to around 102-14 decibels of sound, according to a study by India’s National Institute of Occupational health, much more than the legally permissible 90 decibels, putting them at severe risk of hearing damage

May 16, 2017
Star2.com

Walking linked to improved brain function

A moderate intensity walking regimen may reduce symptoms of mild cognitive impairment that are linked to poor blood vessel health in the brain, a study suggests. Participants with vascular dementia who walked three hours per week for six months had improved reaction times and other signs of improved brain function

May 16, 2017
Reuters

Tobacco consumption epidemic reaches alarming level

The epidemic of tobacco consumption has reached alarming levels in Indonesia, where more than one-third of the country population are smokers. The fast rising number of cases of non-communicable diseases caused by tobacco consumption now pose a serious threat to the sustainability of the National Health Security Programme in Indonesia, the health minister said. Some 20% of teenagers between the ages of 13 and 15 smoke and unhealthy lifestyles of smoking, alcoholic drinks and sugary drinks are creating a slow burning health crisis in the country

May 16, 2017
Antara.com

Mental illness can lead to cardiovascular disease, says a new study

A recent study led by King’s College London researchers shows that people with severe mental illness are at a substantially increased risk of developing cardiovascular disease when compared to the rest of the general population

May 13, 2017
Hindustan Times

Expanding dialysis facilities at affordable cost

Bangladesh medical experts discussed the high costs kidney patients have to pay for haemodialysis and how for many unable to afford it, impaired kidneys is a death sentence, a silent killer. The number of kidney patients in the country is now estimated at 20m and 15,000 to 20,000 of them experience renal failure every year. At least 70% of these patients with renal impairment need dialysis therapy for their survival

May 12, 2017
Financial Express

Umbrella coverage for all: Here’s why India must focus on universal insurance coverage

According to the Aaarogya Bharat Report, the Indian non-communicable disease burden is exploding and it is estimated it will cost the country $6.2tr by 2030. Early detection and management of such diseases is essential to keeping a lid on any potential exploding health costs. The writer says the country needs to focus on preventative and primary care through greater public spending and broader engagement with stakeholders such as technology, media, schools and food companies

May 12, 2017
Financial Express

Antibody genes influence forgotten heart disease

New research has found that genetic differences in antibody genes alter individuals’ susceptibility to rheumatic heart disease, an inflammatory condition known as RHD, that is rife in developing countries. The research is surprising and important as antibody genes have received little attention from those studying inflammatory or autoimmune disease, so it may have ramifications beyond heart disease

May 12, 2017
Medical Express

6m Nigerians Susceptible to Diabetes, Warns Global Panel

A panel set up to seek solutions to tackle global challenges in food and nutrition security, co-chaired by former President of Ghana, John Kufour and John Beddington, former Chief Scientific Adviser to the UK government, and funded by UK Aid and the Gates Foundation warned that the number of Nigerians suffering from Type 2 diabetes will double from 3.1m to 6.1m by 2030 

May 12, 2017
This Day Live

Chronic illness in children linked to mental health issues later

A recent report analysed 37 medical studies to find a link between chronic childhood physical illnesses, including asthma, cancer, chronic renal failure, congenital heart disease, cystic fibrosis, type 1 diabetes, epilepsy and arthritis and emotional problems later in life. Researchers found that all the children reviewed who had experienced chronic conditions in childhood were at an increased risk of developing depression or anxiety and emotional problems that continued throughout adulthood

May 12, 2017
UPI
May 13, 2017
Financial Express
May 12, 2017
Science Daily

People above 30 years to be screened in 100 districts for NCDs

All Indian citizens over 30 years of age are to be screened in 100 districts of the country under the first phase of a programme of universal screening and control for five non-communicable diseases. Gradually, it will cover the entire country and everyone will be screened under the programme to reduce the disease burden in the nation, the Indian health minister told the press

May 16, 2017
Economic Times, News18.com, WebIndia123.com

Cost of treating diabetes highest in the UAE: report

The per capita cost of treating diabetes in Saudi Arabia, the UAE and Qatar are among the highest in the Middle East and North Africa region, according to a new report. The International Diabetes Federation estimates on average 13.6% of the adult population between 20 and 79 years in the region have been diagnosed with diabetes, which is higher than the global average of 8.5%. BMI Research, in its latest report, said Saudi Arabia, the UAE and Qatar have one of the highest diabetes-related expenditure on a per capita basis, reported at $1,145; $2,156 and $2,868 respectively

May 17, 2017
Arabian Business

Scientists get closer to making personalized blood cells by using patients' own stem cells

New research has nudged scientists closer to being able to create customized human stem cells capable of forming blood that would be safe for patients. This potentially opens up a window on what goes wrong in such blood cancers as leukaemia, lymphoma and myeloma and offers the prospect for improved treatment of these cancers which affect millions

May 17, 2017
Los Angeles Times
May 18, 2017
Independent
May 17, 2017
Telegraph, New Scientist

Expert decries neglect of non-communicable diseases in Africa

A leading Nigerian health expert has called out the gross neglect of non-communicable disease in Africa. Dr Abdulrahman Jafar identified hypertension and diabetes as NCDs which have proven to be far more deadly than communicable diseases. He said governments should engage medical experts to sensitise the populace on what they should know and encourage them to go to hospitals

May 18, 2017
Pulse Nigeria

Cardiovascular disease causes one-third of deaths worldwide

Cardiovascular disease, including heart diseases and stroke, accounts for one-third of deaths throughout the world, according to a new scientific study that examined every country over the past 25 years. Countries with the greatest number of CVD deaths, after accounting for population size, are found throughout Eastern Europe,  Central Asia, Middle East, South America, sub-Saharan Africa and Oceania. Additionally, the steep declines previously experienced in the developed world over the past two decades have begun to taper off and plateau 

May 17, 2017
Medical Express, Health Day
May 16, 2017
Reuters

High blood pressure under spotlight this World Hypertension Day

High blood pressure is one of the most common risk factors for stroke, heart attacks and kidney disease within the African population. About 25% of South African adults are hypertensive and carry increased risks. On World Hypertension Day, the South African Heart and Stroke Foundation was encouraging all South Africans to measure their blood pressure and understand their personal risks under the hashtag #

May 17, 2017
IOL, Health24

Billionaire Bloomberg to fund $5m public health projects in 40 cities worldwide

The Guardian reports on Michael Bloomberg’s Partnership for Healthy Cities. Bloomberg was appointed as the World Health Organization’s ambassador for NCDs last year. And now he is taking his philosophy and his cash to about 40 cities so far offering technical support for cities which choose to focus on one of 10 healthy lifestyle issues including, curbing sugary drinks consumption, air pollution, promoting exercise and bans on smoking

May 16, 2017
Guardian

Bhutan making its people healthier, happier by beating noncommunicable diseases

In 2014, Bhutan undertook a nationwide survey to collect, analyse and disseminate health data to get a scale of its problem. 39% of people were overweight or obese, 36% had raised blood pressure and half were not engaged in vigorous physical activity. Now Bhutan is zeroing in on NCDs. Tax on alcohol is now 100% and districts are implementing a WHO-backed alcohol control plan. Strong tobacco laws ban production, sale and use in public places and taxation is high together with strong promotion of physical activity

May 17, 2017
World Health Organization

Obesity on rise as quarter of European teens eat sweets daily

A quarter of adolescents eat sweets or chocolate every day and 14% have a cola or other sugary drink daily, according to a WHO report showing obesity rising among teenagers. Too many young people are in a harmful cycle and most will not outgrow obesity. About four in every five adolescents who become obese will continue to have weight problems as adults. They then develop chronic health conditions such as type 2 diabetes and face psychological issues such as low self-esteem, depression and social isolation

May 17, 2017
The Guardian, Irish Independent, Food Navigator

U.S. Alzheimer's deaths jump 54 percent; many increasingly dying at home

US deaths from Alzheimer’s disease rose by more than 50% from 1999 to 2014, and rates are expected to continue to rise, reflecting the nation’s aging population and increasing life expectancy, American researchers said. In addition, a larger proportion of people with Alzheimer’s are dying at home rather than a medical facility, according to the report released by the U.S. CDC. Alzheimer’s is the sixth-leading cause of death in the U.S., accounting for 3.6% of all deaths in 2014, the report said

May 25, 2017
Reuters
May 26, 2017
Yahoo News UK
May 27, 2017
WTKR3

Walking linked to improved brain function

A moderate intensity walking regime may reduce symptoms of mild cognitive impairment that are linked to poor blood vessel health in the brain, a small study suggests. Participants in a small study with vascular dementia who walked three hours per week for six months had improved reaction times and other signs of improved brain function, the Canadian research team reported

May 26, 2017
Reuters

Child obesity linked to poor heart health

Being overweight or obese, from as young as 3, has been linked to an increased risk of heart disease later in early midlife. New findings, from a study into the health of 1037 people born in Dunedin in 1972-1973, has found that childhood obesity can have lifelong implications. Lead author of the research paper, published in the International Journal of Obesity, professor Michael Williams said those who were overweight, obese or severely obese in early childhood were more at risk. He said while adult obesity was a known risk factor for developing cardiovascular disease - the number one cause of death worldwide - these findings showed the link could be traced back to early childhood

June 7, 2017
New Zealand Herald, Medical Express

Drug deaths on the rise in Europe for third year: report

Drug overdose deaths in Europe rose six percent to 8,441 in 2015, rising for the third consecutive year, driven by increasing use of synthetic opioids like fentanyl, Europe’s Lisbon-based drug monitoring agency said. Deaths from overdoses had been on a downward trend from 2008 to 2012. The agency warned that drug-related deaths in Europe could be much higher due to systematic under-reporting in some countries and delays in reporting

June 6, 2017
Reuters

Sri Lanka's cabinet on Wednesday approved to increase physical activities among school children ...

Sri Lanka`s cabinet on Wednesday approved to increase physical activities among school children and to provide opportunities to consume more healthy meals to prevent obesity, co-Cabinet Spokesperson, Gayantha Karunathilleke told journalists here in a weekly media briefing that around 59 percent of deaths in Sri Lanka were caused by non-communicable diseases such as heart diseases, diabetes, high blood pressure and cancers and majority of deceased were under the age of 60. As less physical activities are a main cause for these diseases, the proposal made by Health Minister Rajitha Senaratne to implement a program under the recommendations of the Ministry of Education for increasing physical activities among school children and to provide opportunities for school children to consume more healthy meals, was approved by the Cabinet of Ministers, Karunathilleke said

June 7, 2017
Xinhua, Colombo Gazette

Lower-income U.S. adults haven't seen heart health gains

Heart health in the US has generally improved since the start of the 21st century, but not for adults living in poverty, a new study suggests. Between 1999 and 2014, high-income people had decreases in rates of high blood pressure, smoking and high risk for heart disease. The same wasn`t true for low-income people, however. The data shows that primary care and prevention is important for people with low incomes, researchers added

June 7, 2017
Reuters

Seattle to become latest U.S. city to tax sugary drinks

Seattle`s City Council voted to levy a special tax on sodas and other sugary beverages sold to consumers, becoming the latest of several local government bodies across the country to take such action for the sake of public health. The measure, to be signed by Mayor Ed Murray, was approved on a 7-1 vote despite staunch opposition from the American Beverage Association, which said the tax would hit poor and working-class families and small businesses hardest. Enactment will add Washington state`s largest city to a growing national movement seeking to curb consumption of soft drinks and other high-caloric beverages that medical experts say are largely to blame for an epidemic of childhood obesity

June 7, 2017