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Section analysis

Promoting health through the life course

In India, Ratio of Young Women Will Drop Sharply, Study Says

The ratio of women to men among India’s young people, which has been low compared with western nations for decades, will drop further in coming years, the Indian government reported. The decline outpaces a more modest drop in the sex ratio among the general population and indicates the continuing practice of sex-selective abortion, experts say. India outlawed prenatal sex determination in 1994 but enforcement is lax

April 20, 2017
New York Times

India to see largest rollout of TB drugs this year

India is to be the first country to roll out the world’s first easily-dissolvable and flavoured TB drug. The child-friendly tablets, which are a combination of two or more medicines in a fixed dose combination, have been recently introduced through the government’s TB control programme in six states and will now be launched privately and through government centres in the remaining states this year

April 19, 2017
Times of India, Times of India

Regulator links Sanofi epilepsy drug to child deformities

Up to 4,100 children in France suffered major malformations in the womb after their mothers took a treatment against epilepsy and bipolar disorder known as valproate between 1967 and 2016, France’s drug regulator said

April 20, 2017
Reuters, Financial Times
April 21, 2017
The Guardian
April 20, 2017
BBC

Increasing caesarean sections in Africa could save more mothers’ lives

Research says low-income countries with the lowest caesarean section rates also have the highest maternal mortality rates. In sub-Saharan Africa close to 550 women die for every 100,000 children that are born, which is 200,000 maternal deaths a year. Two thirds of all maternal deaths globally. Some of these deaths could be prevented if skilled health personnel were able to perform C-sections safely. It would also need proper equipment and supplies including drugs and blood transfusions. Africa (7.3% of babies born by C-section) has the lowest rate in the world. In Europe it is about 25% and in Latin America and the Caribbean, 40.5%

April 20, 2017
Star Kenya
April 24, 2017
Enca
April 20, 2017
News24.com

The trans women "fighting for survival" as rights crackdown continues in Tanzania

Recently 40 private drop-in clinics offering HIV/AIDS services to key populations such as gay men, transgender people and sex workers were banned by the Tanzanian government. A program supported by The Global Fund to Fight AIDS, TB and malaria and implemented by Save the Children to assist key populations eligible for HIV treatment in Tanzania has been put on hold. Another Global Fund grant to distribute water-based lubricants ended in December and lubricants are now banned for promoting homosexuality. The government appears unwilling or unable to tolerate education on LGBT matters and the crackdown on activists can be harsh

April 19, 2017
sbs.com.au

EU gender equality report reveals ‘mountain to climb’

Launching the EU’s annual gender equality report, Vera Jourova, EU Commissioner for Justice, Consumers and Gender Equality told Government Global Forum that the EU still has a mountain to climb with women across the continent continuing to face a glass ceiling in reaching management and leadership positions

April 18, 2017
Global Government Forum

Women may be less apt to get surgery in war-torn countries

A new study shows that Doctors Without Borders data on surgeries conducted in its humanitarian projects in 12 war-torn counties in Africa and the Middle East, between 2008 and 2014, saw surgery performed 69% of the time on men out of nearly 50,000 surgeries conducted. Dr Sherry Wren said it indicates that women are having less access to surgery in these countries. We may not have causality in the analysis but the hypothesis is we are looking at a societal judgement on how women are valued

April 17, 2017
Reuters, CBC News

Nigeria’s gender equality bill not against men, Senator says

A Nigerian woman senator, Binta Garba, has appealed to men in parliament not to see the Gender Equality Bill before the Senate as an ‘affront to them’ but to recognise that men and women are equal partners in progress across all sectors. The bill prohibits all forms of discrimination due to gender, age and disability through spoken words, acts, rules and practices by any person or institution

April 18, 2017
Premium Times , Guardian Nigeria

FEATURE-Kenya's pastoralists look beyond patriarchy to property rights for women

Over-grazing and the sub-division and privatisation of land and its transfer to agricultural use has forced Kenyan herder communities to accept and adopt new land strategies, including applying for security of tenure and women in land transfer and inheritance, eroding the old patriarchal customs of men as decision makers and managers of land and stock

April 19, 2017
Trust.org

Kids with crooked bite may die early

A new study suggests that if a child has a crooked bite it is symptomatic of early life stress. This makes the children more susceptible to diabetes, heart disease and cancer in later life

April 19, 2017
Guardian Nigeria

Rape victims in U.S. made to pay part of the medical bill

Women who have been sexually assaulted in the U.S. often bear some costs for testing and other medical treatment when they report rape to authorities, a new study says. Victims with private insurance pay on average $950, or 14% of the cost of medical services, and the insurers pay the balance, researchers found. With other violent crimes, victims are not responsible for paying for the damage that results from the crime. The financial burden adds to the emotional burden of the assault

April 20, 2017
Reuters

WHO says 69% of pregnant women lack access to preventive malaria treatment in Africa

In a statement ahead of World Malaria Day, WHO called on all malaria endemic countries in Africa to urgently improve access to preventative malaria treatment and other critical tools for pregnant women on the continent. Despite progress made in malaria prevention in pregnant women in Africa, 69% of them are still not receiving the recommended doses of intermittent treatment in pregnancy therapy required for protection against malaria infection

April 21, 2017
Financial Nigeria

Mom's financial strain linked to smaller, weaker babies: study

A new study has found that a financially strapped pregnant woman’s worries about the arrival and care of her little one could contribute to the birth of a smaller, more medically vulnerable infant

April 25, 2017
Outlook India

Widespread Criticism Follows Saudi Arabia Joining U.N. Women's Rights Group

There is a growing backlash to the election of Saudi Arabia to the top United Nations women’s rights body, with critics pointing to the kingdom’s extremely restrictive gender laws. Saudi Arabia is set to join the UN Commission on the Status of Women for a four year term from 2018-2022. UN Watch’s group executive director, Hillel Neur, blasted the international body’s decision citing its regressive views on women’s rights

April 24, 2017
Newsweek, National Review, Middle East Eye

Sex and labor trafficking survivors call for funding and jobs, not pity

After escaping sexual slavery, forced labour and domestic servitude, survivors of human trafficking called or help in finding jobs and funding, not pity, to help them to rebuild their lives. An estimated 46m people are living in modern day slavery and profits from the illegal industry are said to be around $150bn. There are calls for more start-up money for survivors who want to start their own businesses. Survivors need job opportunities to help them pay off debts and bring back some normalcy into their lives

April 25, 2017
Trust.org

Green the red: Indian city breaks taboos for "sustainable menstruation"

The Indian city of Thiruvananthapuram is leading the way in breaking the taboo surrounding menstruation as it seeks to ‘green the red’ and develop a sustainable menstruation project promoted by the city’s civic authority. From vending machines dispensing cotton pads to awareness campaign and higher disposal fees for girls and women using disposable pads, the city of more than 1.5m is taking measures to help women switch to eco-friendly menstruation products

April 25, 2017
Trust.org

WHO says 69% of pregnant women lack access to preventive malaria treatment in Africa

In a statement ahead of World Malaria Day, WHO called on all malaria endemic countries in Africa to urgently improve access to preventative malaria treatment and other critical tools for pregnant women on the continent. Despite progress made in malaria prevention in pregnant women in Africa, 69% of them are still not receiving the recommended doses of intermittent treatment in pregnancy therapy required for protection against malaria infection

April 21, 2017
Financial Nigeria

Dutch boat handing out abortion pills at sea hopes to makes waves in Mexico

A Dutch boat carrying abortion pills for women anchored off the coast of Mexico, in a move designed to draw attention to the country’s stringent abortion laws and barriers faced by women seeking to end their pregnancies. The boat, operated by Dutch non-profit group Women on Waves, provides free abortion services for women up to 9 weeks pregnant in international waters where abortion is banned or restricted

April 21, 2017
Reuters
April 22, 2017
Noticia al Dia, fr.news.yahoo

Indian court orders police to rescue boys trafficked to sweet shops

An Indian court on Monday ordered police to rescue 50 boys believed to have been trafficked from Tamil Nadu to sweet shops in western India. Responding to a petition filed by the father of a missing teenager, the high court told police to form a special team to rescue the boys and submit a report in three weeks

April 24, 2017
Trust.org

WHO pressures Big Pharma to donate more drugs for tropical diseases

The World Health Organization is urging pharma companies to help combat neglected tropical diseases via increased drugs donations. WHO said that while companies like Novartis and GlaxoSmithKline are major donors, further industry assistance is needed. ‘There is no group of diseases that is so intimately linked to poverty. The medicines exist but they are too expensive and neither do the people have the money to be able to pay’

April 24, 2017
In-Pharma Technologist

Caesarean Deliveries or C-Section Cases in India Spike Up by 15 Per Cent

India has witnessed a sudden increase of 15% in caesarean sections or  caesarean deliveries – normally only performed during complicated pregnancies or difficulty in vaginal delivery. The rise in C-section cases, both in rural and urban areas, is due to delayed marriage and as a consequence late child birth, coupled with lifestyle and environmental factors. In some parts of India the numbers have escalated, reaching as high as 41% of deliveries in Kerala and 58% in Tamil Nadu. Surgery can also be ‘charged’ at a higher rate than vaginal delivery, so it may have been a further

April 17, 2017
NDTV

India, better access to contraception is key to reducing maternal deaths

In India one woman dies from complications related to pregnancy or childbirth every 12 minutes, the second highest number of maternal deaths worldwide. For an estimated 45,000 Indian women every year, getting pregnant turns out to be a death sentence but it does not have to be this way. Maternal mortality could be reduced by a third just through healthy timing and spacing of births. So it is essential to a woman’s health that they be able to control whether and when they get pregnant, and this means they need access to

April 11, 2017
The Wire

NGO trains 300 traditional birth attendants in Kaduna

A Kaduna-based NGO, Womanhood Foundation, said it has trained over 300 Traditional Birth Attendants (TBAs) in Kaduna state as part of effort to ensure safe motherhood. The beneficiaries were mostly from communities without health facilities. The aim is to empower the TBAs to go back to their communities and offer help to pregnant women before, during and after delivery. She urged the state government to support those trained with necessary kits to enhance their skills and support to women at the community level

April 11, 2017
Vanguard Nigeria, Nigeria Today, PMNews Nigeria

97% of meningitis victims in Zamfara are women - NGO

Save the Children says that about 97% of all the meningitis victims in Zamfara are women.  The NGO monitored the victims of meningitis in isolation centres set up by the state government at various health facilities to arrive at this percentage. The news was attributed to poverty, illiteracy and poor accessibility to healthcare services. By educating girls and empowering women within the family the meningitis scourge could have been foreseen and managed more efficiently

April 11, 2017
Pulse Nigeria, Vanguard Nigeria

IOM learns of slave market conditions endangering migrants in North Africa

The International Organization for Migration released a report documenting shocking events on North African migrant routes, where slave markets have been set up, designed to buy and sell African victims bound for Libya. Immigrants are often held as ‘hostages’ as migrants call their families back home to ask for their relatives to send the gangs cash. Women were bought and sold as sex slaves and suffer brutal treatment from the gangs behind the evil trade

April 11, 2017
International Organization for Migration
April 12, 2017
Global Times
April 11, 2017
Trust.org

Indian TV commercial showing adored transgender mother goes viral

A TV commercial by Proctor & Gamble’s Vicks brand, which tells the real-life story of a transgender woman and her adopted daughter has sparked a conversation about transgender rights in India, where the community still faces deep biases despite gaining rights. The 3.5 minute commercial has racked up more than 9 million views on YouTube since its release two weeks ago

April 11, 2017
Trust.org, NBC News

Around 90% of Indian toddlers do not receive a proper diet

Around 90% of children under two in India are struggling to get proper diet crucial for their development, according to NGO Child Rights and You, citing National Family Health Survey data from 2015/16. Deprived of a healthy start, millions of these children will bear the impact of this under-nutrition not just in early years of their childhood but throughout their lives

April 8, 2017
Asian Age, Deccan Chronicle, NDTV, India Live Today

12,000 infants died in Odisha in 2016-17

According to data from the Odisha state health department a whopping 12,000 infants died in the state during 2016-17. The data revealed 6,500 infants died due to anaemic conditions inherited from the mother or malaria, Similarly a total of 1,600 babies died from pneumonia or sepsis, which increased during this period. The two biggest causes behind infant mortality were low birth weight and asphyxia, the data reveal, pointing to how poor nutrition is playing havoc with new born lives

April 9, 2017
Daily Pioneer

Most doctors' breast cancer advice may be out of date

A new study says that women may be getting contradictory advice on when they should start having a regular mammogram. The study found some doctors suggesting between the ages of 40 and 44 (81%) and others between the ages of 45 and 49 (89%), advice with contradicts U.S. Federal recommendations which say start at age 50

April 10, 2017
Time

Why Assam’s two-child policy plan is being criticized by public health experts

Assam has proposed a new population policy for the state which penalises people who have more than two children. If the draft becomes law they would be ineligible for government jobs and benefits and be barred from contesting all elections under the state election commission. Analysts believe this move by the BJP-led state government is directed at Bengali-speaking Muslim immigrants who are perceived to have larger families. Activist believe this policy is unconstitutional and violates rights of citizens

April 12, 2017
Scroll India

Kidnapping forced marriage – Pakistan’s Hindu women now have hope for protection from new la...

Women from the mostly-Muslim Pakistan Hindu minority now have the right to a certificate establishing a wife’s marital status under the Hindu Marriage Act 2017, which was signed into law on March 19th. Prior to this, many Hindu girls and married women had lived in the constant fear of being kidnapped, forced to abandon their faith and convert and re-marry forcibly someone who is not of the Hindu faith. Activists said it still needs strong political will to ensure its implementation and campaigns in school and the media to raise awareness of the legislation

April 12, 2017
Trust.org

Aussie Muslim Leaders Slam Hizb Ut-Tahrir Domestic Violence Video

Prominent Muslim community leaders slammed a video from radical Islamic group Hizb ut-Tahrir defending violence against women. In the video women from this fringe group argued that disobedient wives could be disciplined by being hit. The video sparked outrage across Australia and the rest of the world with a coalition of Muslim leaders and commentators saying “there is absolutely no justification for men to demean, threaten or abuse women, whether symbolically or otherwise” in a public statement

April 14, 2017
Huffington Post
April 13, 2017
Daily Telegraphj
April 14, 2017
The Guardian, Evening Standard

"We want to learn": Iraqi girls back at school after years under Islamic State

Thomson Reuters Foundation News reports on schools reopening in the Mosul area of Iraq, highlighting the enthusiasm for learning that young people are showing, particularly among the young girls

April 17, 2017
Trust.org

HIV Positive Model Crowned Miss Congo UK 2017

Horcelie Sinda Wa Mbongo was crowned Miss Congo UK 2017 at a gala ceremony held in London. Horcelie (22) was born with the virus but had no idea she was positive until she was eleven years old. She has been an active campaigner in the battle against HIV Aids and is an advocate of living positively with the disease. She plans to work in collaboration with a youth group called Youth Stop AIDS which campaigns for a world without AIDS

April 15, 2017
Face2Face Africa
April 13, 2017
Times of India

Trump signs resolution allowing U.S. states to block family planning funds

President Donald Trump signed a resolution that will allow U.S. states to restrict how federal funds for contraception and reproductive health are spent, a move cheered by anti-abortion campaigners. “Allowing states to withhold Title X funding from family planning clinics won’t make anyone safer or healthier – it will instead place essential services out of reach, a spokesperson for Physicians for Reproductive Health said, adding that for many the clinics are the only place where they can receive affordable health services such as disease testing

April 13, 2017
Reuters, Bloomberg

One third of Indonesian women suffer abuse, prompting UN calls for action

One third of Indonesian women have faced physical or sexual violence, according to new government data, prompting calls by a UN agency for urgent action to protect women. The government’s first national survey on violence against women showed 33% of women between the ages of 15-64 – around 26 million people – said they faced abuse in their lives. Cases of violence are most common among women who have received a higher education and those who live in an urban area

April 12, 2017
Trust.org, Straits Times

Celebrated African women hope to inspire girls to narrow gender gap

Twelve women from Mali, Morocco and Zimbabwe among other countries, were honoured at a ceremony hosted by the New African Woman magazine in the Senegalese capital Dakar. The awards seek to celebrate successful African women in fields ranging from politics and business to agriculture and the arts and they seek to inspire girls across the continent to strive towards closing the gender gap, winners of the New African Women Awards commented

April 13, 2017
Reuters, GNN Liberia
April 14, 2017
Africa News

Kenya’s high court has ruled that a third of parliamentarians must be women

Earlier this month, Kenya’s high court ordered parliament to ensure that at least a third of its seats are held by women or risk dissolution. Kenyan lawmakers have about 50 days to figure out a way to guarantee women’s representation in parliament. In 2010, Kenya adopted a constitutional law that said no more than two-thirds of the legislature may be held by one gender. The government has delayed enforcing that ruling and now the court is pressing it to act

April 13, 2017
QZ.com
April 18, 2017
New Times Rwanda

Ashanti ups effort to fight teen sex and pregnancy

The campaign to bring down the rates of teen pregnancy has been scaled up in Ghana’s Ashanti region with the training of more young people for reproductive health advocacy. This is being done under the guidance of the Ghana Adolescent Reproductive Health project, an intervention to improve youth health information and quality reproductive services

May 6, 2017
Myjoyonline

Saudi step to relax male guardianship welcomed by women's advocates

Local Saudi media reports that the King of Saudi Arabia has issued an order allowing women to benefit from government services such as education and healthcare without getting the consent of a male guardian. This move was tentatively welcomed as another small step for women in this deeply conservative kingdom

May 5, 2017
Reuters

In South Africa, mothers lead push to get pregnant women tested for HIV

South African mothers are leading the push to get pregnant women tested for HIV; mothers2mothers support groups are helping women to understand the value of HIV testing for young pregnant women and how this is leading to a cut in transmission of a virus that can pass AIDS from mothers to babies

May 5, 2017
Reuters

N.J. female physicians make less than their counterparts, study shows

A new study shows that female physicians in New Jersey make less than their male counterparts. The report shows the average wage gap in New Jersey was as much as 30%, one of the highest in the north east. Gaps in U.S. doctor compensation exist across 48 specialities, major cities and genders, according to research scientists Doximity, a national online network for doctors

May 6, 2017
Press of Atlantic City

Contagio del Zika en embarazadas alerta a salud pública

In Ecuador the health minister is calling for more protection for pregnant women against the growing zika threat. Health minister, Veronica Espinosa called on people to redouble their efforts to protect pregnant women against picking up the virus, particularly because of the risk of congenital complications that might be passed on to the baby

May 7, 2017
Metro Ecuador

1 million children refugees from South Sudan's civil war

More than 1m children have fled South Sudan’s civil war, two UN agencies said on Monday, part of the world’s fastest growing refugee crisis. Roughly 62% of refugees from South Sudan are children, according to the UN, and more than 75,000 are alone or without families, about 1.8m have fled South Sudan in total

May 8, 2017
kwwl.com

Early puberty tied to increased risk of dating abuse

A new study shows that girls who go through puberty sooner may be more likely to experience dating abuse than their peers who develop later, a U.S. study says. Girls who make the early transition to puberty are at risk of lower self-esteem and of depression, and these characteristics may give them fewer coping skills to leave relationships that ultimately become abusive. The risk also rises proportionally to the increased levels of exposure to more boys at an earlier, more unprepared age

May 8, 2017
Reuters

African countries to feel worst of US health aid cuts, report says

New findings from the Kaiser Family Foundation indicate that African countries, and those where abortion services are legal, will likely feel the greatest impact of the U.S. ‘global gag rule’ – also known as the Mexico City Policy. The U.S. provided bilateral global health assistance to 65 countries in fiscal year 2016, and more than half of them (34) were African. With the reintroduction of this policy $8bn in U.S. global health assistance is at stake which was previously tied to just U.S. family planning funding. Potentially expanded guidelines for funding roll this out wider across the 34 nations and encourage NGOs to discontinue legal activities in order to comply

May 5, 2017
Devex

India begins legalising mica mining after child worker deaths expose

Authorities in eastern India have begun the process of legalising mica mining, a senior government official said last week, after a Thomson Reuters Foundation investigation uncovered the deaths of children working in illegal mines. A three months investigation in Jharkhand found at least seven children had died in just two months in the illegal mines – as they picked and sorted the prize mineral which adds the sparkle to make-up and car paint

May 4, 2017
Trust.org, Jakarta Globe

Kept in the dark about sex, girls in Guatemala suffer consequences

Reuters reports on Guatemala, which has one of the highest rates of unwanted pregnancies due to a lack of information about sex, girls own bodies and endemic violence, according to women’s health campaigners. Government statistics cited by the Planned Parenthood Federation recorded more than 5,000 pregnancies by girls under 14 in 2014 – in four out of five of the cases, the offender was a close relative, such as a father uncle or grandparent. Over the last five years, one quarter of all children in Guatemala have been born to adolescent mothers, data shows

May 3, 2017
Reuters, Reuters

The Activist Taking on Patriarchy to End Domestic Violence in Kenya

News Deeply featured Kenyan activist, Saida Ali, who is taking on ‘dowry culture’ and a ‘fixation on reproduction’ which has contributed to waves of domestic violence towards women in African homes. It tells her story and expresses her view that awareness campaigns about domestic violence are on the rise and that she is more optimistic that attitudes are slowly starting to change

May 3, 2017
News Deeply

In 41 years, as economy grew 2,100%, infant mortality dropped just 68%

The Economic Times points out that over the last 41 years an Indian national health programme to reduce infant mortality across the country has brought about a 68% drop in numbers to 2016, against a backdrop of an economy growing 2,100% during the same period. Even so, India’s Infant Mortality Rate of 41 deaths per 1,000 live births is still higher than poorer neighbours like Bangladesh (31) and Nepal (29)

May 3, 2017
Economic Times, Hindustan Times

Kenya hopes to double maternity leave to boost mother and child health

Kenya is hoping to pass a new law which will see maternity leave increased to six months from three if a bill before parliament is passed in a bid to boost the health of mothers and babies. The bill is opposed by employer groups who say businesses cannot afford to give women the time off, even though the second three months would be optional, unpaid leave

May 8, 2017
Reuters

La depresión posparto es el lado oscuro de la maternidad

El Nuevo Dia features an article on Postnatal Depression and its prevalence and impact on one in five women. It cites WHO figures that a study of 7,187 women in Mexico in 2012 concluded that the dramatic changes and mood swings that affect one in five women are part of this syndrome. It is particularly tough to detect and is often put down to baby blues, when for most women it resolves itself after a few weeks, for some it carries on for months and that is when it becomes critical and needs medical support. The stigma of seeking support should be removed and the issue more actively discussed and understood, argues the article

May 10, 2017
El Nuevo Dia

U.S. state could become first to enact blanket ban on child marriage: activists

A measure to ban child marriage could become law in New Jersey this week, which would make it the first of the 50 states in America to outlaw the practice without exception. It would prohibit marriage of children under the age of 18. Activists say the practice of under-aged marriage is rampant in the U.S. where about 170,000 children were wed between 2000 and 2010 in 38 states where data was available. That could be as high as 248,000 children, according to Unchained At Last, an NGO campaigning to change laws on arranged or forced marriages

May 10, 2017
Reuters

Les effets secondaires du stérilet hormonal Mirena

There are complaints from women in Europe about Bayer’s Mirena Coil, with users talking about it having terrible side effects such as full-blown depression, anxiety, hair loss and other symptoms. The French media are speculating whether this issue could blow up into a full international health scandal

May 10, 2017
Cosmopolitan
May 9, 2017
TV5 Monde, Marie Claire
May 10, 2017
Marie Claire

Report finds CAP highly inefficient especially to environmental effects

A new report from the European Environmental Bureau and BirdLife Europe suggests that an overhaul of EU farm policy is needed to meet global sustainable development goals SDG12 and SDG15. The EU Commission defended the policy but admitted things can always be improved 

May 11, 2017
Farmers Journal

Abortion pill group's Facebook page deleted over promoting 'drug use'

Facebook censored the page of an organization that helps women obtain abortion pills, citing its policy against ‘the promotion or encouragement of drug use.’ Women on Web, which is based in Amsterdam, helps connect women with doctors who can provide abortion pills if they live in countries where abortion is restricted. It is a sister organization to Women on Waves, which provides abortions and other reproductive services on a ship in international waters 

May 11, 2017
The Guardian
May 12, 2017
Newsweek, Telegraph, International Business Times

Human poo transformed into clean fuel for Kenya's urban poor

Reuters writes about an initiative being run by the Nakuru Water and Sanitation Services Company which is recycling human waste collected from pit latrines and septic tanks (the raw material for its briquettes). In its processes it removes impurities and smell along with harmful pathogens during the carbonisation process and adds molasses for a sweet aroma. The briquettes burn longer with less smoke compared to firewood and charcoal. With only 27% of the local residents connected to the town’s sewage system the scheme is a more sustainable way to dispose of large quantities of human waste. It is attracting interest from neighbouring counties and countries such as Rwanda 

May 12, 2017
Reuters

Finding Inspiration In Clean Water And Decent Toilets

WaterAid CEO Barbara Frost is retiring and she recalls her time as head of the organization and talks about several examples where the intervention of the NGO has made a significant material difference to people’s lives in the developing world

May 11, 2017
Huffington Post

Sham marriages in Scotland reveal extent of slavery - activists

Thomson Reuters Foundation report on a story about criminal gangs who are tricking East Europeans into sham Scottish marriages with Asian men – selling the women for sex, labour and passports. Campaigners say this expose reveals the extent of human slavery worldwide. The anti-slavery group, Unseen, said it believes there are between 10,000 and 13,000 people living as slaves in Britain alone. Worldwide this estimate leaps to 45.8m, according to the Global Slavery Index

May 10, 2017
Trust.org

Gut bacteria may help explain benefits of breastfeeding

Breastfeeding has long been linked to a variety of health benefits in babies and a new study suggests that bacteria transferred from mothers to their nursing infants might at least be partly responsible. Researchers found gut microbial communities matched the bacteria in their mothers’ milk and on their mothers’ skin much more than it resembled samples from other women in the study

May 9, 2017
Reuters

Newly discovered malaria mechanism gives hope to pregnant women

esistance to malaria drugs means that pregnant women are unable to overcome the anaemia caused by the malaria parasite – and their babies are born undersized. A study carried out at Karolinska Institutet, however, exposes the effects of malaria in pregnant women and shows how the PTEF protein is central to the infection. The study, which is published in the scientific journal Nature Microbiology, opens the way for new malaria drugs

May 9, 2017
Phys.org

UN gender equality report gives insight into Arab male identity

CNN covered a UN Women and Promundo report into the attitudes of Middle Eastern men towards gender equality. Respondents said they felt they were at a crossroads as they tried to negotiate a world of shifting gender identity. Shereen El-Feki, co-principal of the report, said that without involving men in discussions, society will be unable to close the region’s gender gap

May 10, 2017
CNN

HRT could increase the risk of deafness, major study finds

Women who take HRT to help them cope with symptoms of the menopause could face an increased risk of deafness, a landmark study suggests. The research on more than 80,000 women found that those who took hormone replacement therapy for between five and ten years had a 15% higher risk of hearing loss. And those who took it for longer had a still greater chance of suffering from deafness, the mass study said. Scientists said it was not clear why the pills were linked to a higher chance of hearing loss

May 10, 2017
Telegraph, EurekAlert, NDTV

Acutely malnourished Somalian children increase to 1.4 mln: UNICEF

The number of Somali children who are, or soon will be, severely malnourished, has risen by 50% to 1.4m since January, according to UNICEF. The UN body said this number includes over 275,000 who are already experiencing, or will soon do so, life-threatening severe acute malnutrition. About 615,000 people, the vast majority women and children, have been displaced by drought since November 2016. But the combination of drought, disease and displacement is deadly, particularly for children, and the world urgently needs to do more

May 2, 2017
xinhuanet, Daily Sabah, UN News, Prensa Latina, News International, AllAfrica.com, tst.pt, China.org
May 4, 2017
UNICEF

Now, Get Condoms Delivered To Your Doorstep Absolutely Free

A bold new initiative in India is seeking to find a way around the social stigma of buying condoms and a lack of privacy in chemist shops by delivering them to your door free of cost. The global charity AIDS Healthcare Foundation launched this first free condom store and any NGO, government body or private institute which wishes to add condom distribution to their services can do so. The aim is to meet the shortfall in supply and for active measures in controlling the spread of HIV (

April 28, 2017
Huffington Post, Doctor NDTV, zeenews
April 27, 2017
International Business Times
April 28, 2017
News Nation
April 27, 2017
The News Minute, The Ladies Finger

India's Muslim women fight tradition and family for right to property

The Thomson Reuters Foundation features the story of how Muslim Indian women are starting to reject outmoded tradition and family prejudice to start fighting for their legal rights to own property

April 28, 2017
Trust.org

Nigeria: 1,480 Domestic Violence Cases Recorded in Two Years - LASG

Across Africa, domestic violence is the most prevalent form of violence against women and girls, but many authorities see it as a family matter. Women’s groups say education is key to helping survivors stand up and report abuse when it happens

April 27, 2017
allafrica.com, News Deeply

Postpartum haemorrhage: Cheap lifesaver 'cuts deaths by a third'

Every year, 100,000 women die from massive bleeding in the moments after giving birth. Now an international study published by the Lancet suggests that tranexamic acid could cut that number by a third. It acts by stopping blood clots from breaking down to make it easier for the body to stem bleeding

April 27, 2017
BBC
April 26, 2017
Reuters

‘Overemphasis on polio hampering fight against other diseases’

The Pakistan Paediatric Association (PPAP) said that thousands of children in Sindh are dying of vaccine-preventable diseases because the state health authorities are over-emphasizing the fight against polio and neglecting the equally important fight against other vaccine preventable diseases

April 26, 2017
The News Pakistan

Scientists develop fluid-filled artificial womb to help premature babies

Scientists in the United States have developed a fluid-filled womb-like bag known as an extra-uterine support device that could transform care for extremely premature babies, thereby significantly increasing their chances of survival

April 26, 2017
Reuters, Fortune, Times of India, Washington Post

NGO Trains 6000 Women

The Women Inspiration Development Centre (WIDC), an NGO, said it has trained 6,000 women and girls in 12 rural communities in self-protection against gender-based violence in 2016. Mrs Busayo Obisakin, WIDC Founder, said the training has been done in collaboration with a U.S.-based NGO called ‘Imagine.’ In her presentation in Lagos, Mrs Obisakin listed the organizations outcomes: with some women achieving peace in their homes as a result of economic empowerment, some women have left their unrepentant husbands and are in peace with their children, some with health issues understand their situation better and are seeing improvement, some are furthering studies and attending weekend schools and others have small businesses and are accessing microfinance from banks

April 27, 2017
PMNews Nigeria

Female clerics declare fatwa on child marriage in Indonesia

Female clerics in Indonesia issued an unprecedented fatwa against child marriage in the country in a bid to stop young girls becoming brides. The fatwa came at the end of a three-day conference of female clerics: a rare example of women assuming a lead role in religious affairs in this mostly Muslim country. ‘Maternal mortality is very high in Indonesia so we as female clerics must play a lead role on this issue and not just wait for the government to protect these children’

April 27, 2017
Trust.org

‘Low immunisation behind high infant mortality rate’

Pakistan has the highest infant mortality rate in South Asia because of the low rate of immunization and vaccination coverage. With about 56% of the country covered, almost half the children in the country are simply not immunized, according to an expert from the Pakistan Paediatric Association

April 30, 2017
Dawn, News International, Nation, Business Recorder
April 29, 2017
Pakistan Today

HIV-Positive Women Overwhelmingly Report Leading Healthier, More Self-Assured Lives Thanks to Th...

The Well Project reports that the majority of women who used its online resources and programmes, engaged more with healthcare and self-care and had developed a better outlook on living with HIV

May 2, 2017
The Body

580 niños de madres con VIH Sida en Carabobo tienen más de un año sin tomar leche

More than 580 young HIV-positive mothers with infants in Carabobo, Venezuela, have gone more than a year without receiving antiretroviral drugs for their children, or milk formula for them, and many infants are already presenting signs of malnutrition, according to Eduardo Franco, President of NGO Mavid. To date, the government has not responded to requests for help in any way

May 2, 2017
El Carabobeno

Opinion: Where were the women at the World Bank Land and Poverty Conference?

The writer argues that gender was missing from most of the plenary sessions she attended. “Addressing gender issues requires a conviction that attention to gender is necessary”. “It requires employing time and financial resources, predicated on the knowledge that shrugging off the need for these resources means letting down women, the largest and most consistently marginalized population on the planet”

May 2, 2017
Devex

Young women, girls targeted in new HIV prevention method

Sexually active young women and girls between 15-24 are among the high risk groups targeted in the May 4th roll out of a new method to protect HIV-negative people from contracting the virus in Kenya. The approach, known as pre-exposure prophylaxis (PrEP) involves people at high risk of contracting HIV taking an antiretroviral pill, Truvada, daily to lower their chances of getting infected

May 1, 2017
Nation

93,000 people die annually from firewood smoke – NGO

The Women’s Initiative for Sustainable Environment and the Women’s Earth Alliance have trained 30 women from different communities across Kaduna State on how to use clean and energy efficient cooking stoves. The NGO director said ‘if a woman cooked breakfast, lunch and supper with firewood, the consequence of her action was equivalent to smoking three packs of 20 cigarettes a day.’ Smoke is the biggest killer of people, particularly women, after malaria and HIV Aids; no less than 72% of Nigerians solely depend on firewood for cooking their meals

April 30, 2017
PMNews Nigeria

Men in the Middle East slow to embrace gender equality - study

Most young men in the Middle East and North Africa still hold traditional attitudes similar to their fathers towards women’s role in society, according to a survey, which said the region was bucking a global trend by not embracing change fully. The study of nearly 10,000 men and women across Egypt, Lebanon, Morocco and the Palestinian Territories also revealed significant levels of domestic violence and sexual harassment

May 2, 2017
Trust.org, Reuters, Guardian, BBC

Somalia - malnutrition, cholera and diarrhoea rising among children - cases increase

Thousands of children in Somalia suffer from acute malnutrition, cholera and diarrhoea and the figure in increasingly rapidly. According to UNICEF, therapeutic food was given in the months of January and February to 35,400 sick children, double the amount compared to the same period in 2016, while 18,400 were diagnosed with cholera and watery diarrhoea

April 8, 2017
Foreign Affairs
April 7, 2017
Agenzia Fides

How Tanzania is cracking down on LGBT and getting away with it

BuzzFeed reports that Tanzania has been terrorizing its LBGT community on the back of stigma and prejudice and imperilling the country’s response to HIV Aids programme management

April 8, 2017
BuzzFeed.com

Smoking during pregnancy tied to eye damage in kids

When women smoke during pregnancy, or have underweight babies, their children have a greater risk of developing  a type of retina damage, a Danish study suggests

March 8, 2017
Reuters

Folic acid levels in pregnancy linked to children's blood pressure

A new study found that babies born to mothers who took high levels of folic acid during pregnancy were less likely to develop high blood pressure

March 8, 2017
UPI, Health Day News, Health 24

South Africa’s rape epidemic

In a study published in November, by the University of Witwatersrand and Sonke Gender Justice, 2,600 men in Diepsloot were surveyed anonymously. An astonishing 38% admitted to having used force or threats to obtain sex in the preceding year. Add those who said they had beaten, hurt or threatened to use a weapon against a women and the share jumped to 54% and these men said they had committed such crimes more than once

March 9, 2017
The Economist

Kenya to campaign against child marriage, protect women’s rights

Kenya became the 19th African country to commit to the African Union’s campaign to end child marriage. It declared zero tolerance to violence and discrimination against women and girls, as it signed up to International Women’s Day

March 9, 2017
Star Kenya

REVEALED: Domestic violence, sexual abuse make women more vulnerable to HIV

Domestic violence and sexual abuse increases the risk of HIV among women, a new report by UNAIDS has revealed. A lack of access to education and health services and a lack of decision-making power are contributing factors to women’s vulnerability to HIV, the report concluded

March 10, 2017
The Cable Nigeria

Las embarazadas pueden sufrir gripes H1N1 más peligrosas tras el parto

Pregnant women could be at more risk of contracting hazardous H1N1 flu after delivery, says a new study, because their immune system levels are lower

March 9, 2017
El Economista

Gender equality is out of reach, a quarter of all women fear

One in four British women believes gender equality is impossible to achieve, according to a new study. Nine out of ten of them are not optimistic that gender equality can be achieved in the next five years  

March 8, 2017
Chronicle Live

Bangladesh acid attack survivors show new confidence on fashion runway

Bangladesh hosted a fashion show with a difference to mark International Women’s Day, featuring 15 confident catwalk models fighting to overcome the trauma of acid attacks

March 8, 2017
Reuters

For refugee women, periods a dangerous, shameful time

A study conducted by Global One in displacement and refugee camps in Syria and Lebanon found that almost 60% of female refugees did not have access to underwear and many more had no sanitary products for when they had their period. Over half the women interviewed had suffered from urinary tract infections which were often left untreated, the study found

March 8, 2017
Reuters

For women of color, the 'healthcare gap' is real and deadly

A recent study found that women of colour in America die from cervical cancer at more than twice the rate of white women in America. In fact, they are dying at rates comparable to those in much poorer developing countries. Cervical cancer is highly preventable, so why is this happening?

March 8, 2017
The Hill

One in three Kenyan women battered before 18

One in three Kenyan women have experienced violence before reaching the age of 18, a youth campaigner told Capital FM Kenya

March 8, 2017
Capital FM

On International Women’s Day UNAIDS is urging countries to stop 1 million women and girls from...

UNAIDs released a new report showing there is an urgent need to scale up HIV prevention and treatment services for women and girls. In 2015 there were 18.6m women and girls living with HIV, with 1m of them becoming newly infected and 470,000 women and girls dying of AIDS related

March 8, 2017
UNAids, Punch Nigeria

At least 12,000 people killed by domestic violence every year? Russia's not even sure

With Russia recently signing a bill to decriminalise domestic violence, this is a pandemic that is leading to around 38 women being killed every day with the deaths in rural areas, sometimes masked as suicides

March 10, 2017
PRI.org

Chinese Lawmaker Proposes Cutting Nation's High Marriage Age

A Chinese lawmaker is proposing to cut the minimum age for men and women to marry,, down from 20 for women and 22 for men to just 18 years old. The rationale is to encourage more births as the nation grows older

March 12, 2017
Bloomberg

Millions of Women Don’t Have Access to Fertility Treatments in the U.S.

According to a new report, whether or not a woman in the USA has access to clinics that offer fertility services depends on where she lives. The authors of the study found that about 40% of women of reproductive age have limited or no access to ART clinics

March 14, 2017
Time

Glaxo to Pay First Woman CEO Less, Cites Lack of Experience

Emma Walmsley, who is poised to take over as the first female CEO at GlaxoSmithKline Plc, will earn a quarter less than her predecessor, ‘to reflect her lack of experience at the helm.’ This lower compensation for a woman, who is breaking the gender barrier to become one of the first females to manage a top 25 pharmaceutical company, is likely to reignite the debate on the pay gap between the sexes, according to Bloomberg

March 14, 2017
Bloomberg

Girls 'too poor' to buy sanitary protection missing school

Some girls in the UK are too poor to buy sanitary protection and are missing school. Now a charity that provides sanitary protection to women in Kenya is now doing the same for girls in West Yorkshire

March 14, 2017
bbc.co.uk

Women’s rights are under fresh assault worldwide, UN Secretary-General Antonio Guterres warned...

Women’s rights are under fresh assault worldwide, UN Secretary-General Antonio Guterres warned as the UN kicked off a conference to take stock of the fight for gender equality

March 14, 2017
Straits Times, Yahoo News

Placenta more vulnerable to Zika in early pregnancy

A new study has found that the placenta is much more vulnerable to Zika infection in the first trimester of pregnancy and this explains why the congenital damage caused by the virus is more serious in the early stages of a child’s parental development. Researchers also found that the Zika strain in Africa is more virulent than the Asian strain. The African strain multiplies faster than the Asian strain, destroying placental cells and compromising gestation

March 14, 2017
SciDev.net

Filipino women struggle for birth control

Philippine President Rodrigo Duterte issued an executive order calling for the full implementation of the so-called Reproductive Health Law which would give an estimated 6m women in need access to birth control. But unless the Supreme Court lifts its temporary restraining order on the registration of contraceptives, the Philippines may run out by 2020. According to government data an estimated 2m women are poor and require government assistance to access contraceptives

March 13, 2017
Deutsche Welle

Women with failed fertility treatments increase their risk of heart disease, Canadian study warn...

A new Canadian study is warning that women who undergo fertility treatment, but don’t get pregnant, increase their risk of developing long-term heart disease. The study’s authors say ‘failed fertility therapies boost women’s risk of heart disease by 19% when compared to their peers whose treatment was successful’

March 13, 2017
Global News
March 14, 2017
Sun Sentinel, Medical Daily

Study finds new class of androgens play key role in polycystic ovary syndrome

Scientists led by the University of Birmingham have discovered a new class of male sex hormones, known as androgens, which play a key role in the development of polycystic ovary syndrome (PCOS). This is a common condition which can lead to irregular periods, polycystic ovaries and high levels of androgens which sometimes manifest themselves in physical signs such as excess facial or body hair

March 13, 2017
Science Daily

Bolivia Eyes Legalizing Abortion for Women in Extreme Poverty

Bolivia is considering legalizing abortion for women in extreme poverty. The proposal seeks to decriminalize abortion in nine cases, including in the case of mothers who are living in poverty and do not have the resources to support the child  

March 12, 2017
TelesurTV

Ireland Has To Trust Women With Their Own Reproductive Rights - If Not More Will Die

Eleven women travel every single day from Ireland to the UK in order to access safe abortions. The London-Irish Abortion Rights Campaign called for women’s reproductive rights to be recognised

March 13, 2017
Huffington Post

CDC warns women about Zika-infected semen

The CDC issued a warning that more people in South Florida’s tri-county area may have been exposed to the Zika virus than previously thought. And since the virus can remain in semen for up to three months, CDC officials said that women who are pregnant, or planning to get pregnant from donated sperm, should consult with their doctors

March 13, 2017
USA Today

Women Who Have Sex With Women Are Being Incorrectly Told They Don’t Need Smear Tests

LGBT women are incorrectly being told they do not need to attend smear tests, LGBT charities are warning. Research shows that 37% of women in this category have been told they do not require a cervical smear test due to their sexual orientation. So, over half of them have disengaged from the screening programme wrongly believing they were not at risk

March 13, 2017
Huffington Post

US may go cheek by jowl with women’s rights abusers at UN gender talks

Donald Trump’s ‘global gag rule’ could align the U.S. with Iran, Sudan, Syria and other countries targeted by his U.S. travel ban at the Commission on the Status of Women talks in New York 

March 13, 2017
The Guardian

There’s a Global Rape Epidemic and There Are Few Laws to Prevent it

A report released last week entitled ‘The World’s Shame’ by the international human rights organization Equality Now, has revealed the inadequacy of laws all over the world to protect women against sexual violence. Over a lifetime, one in three women will experience physical or sexual violence – regardless of age, background or country. According to UNICEF, one in 10 girls – around 120m – experience rape or sexual assault globally

March 8, 2017
Global Citizen

Early Periods May Increase Women's Risk of Gestational Diabetes

Earlier periods may increase a woman’s risk of gestational diabetes as a pregnancy complication, a new study has found

March 7, 2017
NDTV, The Conversation, Real Health Mag
March 8, 2017
Malay Mail
March 6, 2017
Tribune India

Listeria May Pose Serious Threat Early in Pregnancy

A new study into how listeria affects the foetus has shown that listeria infection in pregnancy may go unnoticed with few recognizable symptoms other than the discomfort most pregnant women feel.  The study was based on Listeria’s spread in rhesus macaques. On the basis of the findings, the research team are theorizing that’ the maternal immune system’s attempt to clear the bacteria actually results in collateral damage to the placenta which then allows the bacteria to invade the foetus’

March 1, 2017
LabMedica

Saudi Arabia delaying aid to Yemen is 'killing children', warns Save the Children

Save the Children said ‘shipments of aid are being delayed for months, denying hundreds of thousands of people access to urgently needed medical aid.’ This year, the Saudi-led coalition has prevented three of the charity’s shipments of medical supplies from landing, forcing them to be re-routed and delaying their arrival by up to three months

March 1, 2017
The Independent

Government failing to educate, integrate Roma children

Slovakia’s school system is riddled with institutional racism and it fails to prepare for life after school, according to Amnesty International in a new report

March 1, 2017
AlJazeera, Amnesty International

Bangladesh law allowing child brides may legitimize rape: charities

Child rights groups said a new Bangladeshi law that lets under-age girls marry their rapists for ‘the greater good of the adolescent’ may put more children at risk of sexual abuse. Legitimizing marriage for young rape victims in the name of ‘honour’ does nothing to protect their bodies or their rights, advocates said

March 1, 2017
Reuters

Most older women don’t get bone tests after hip fractures

When older women fracture a hip, they usually don’t get bone density tests which might show whether they need treatment to help prevent more broken bones, a U.S. study

March 2, 2017
Reuters

Liberia investigates death of celebrated Ebola fighter amid stigma fears

The death from childbirth of a woman named Time Magazine’s ‘Person of the Year’ in 2014, for her work in fighting Ebola in Liberia, is being investigated, after reports that ‘health workers were afraid to treat her,’ the country’s health ministry said

March 1, 2017
Reuters
February 28, 2017
UPI, Scientific American
March 1, 2017
BBC
February 27, 2017
Time

Breast cancer costs low-income women more jobs

Poor women undergoing breast cancer treatment are four times more likely to lose their jobs than their high-income peers, a new study says

February 28, 2017
Reuters

As H.I.V. Soars in Philippines, Conservatives Kill School Condom Plan

‘The Philippines has the fastest growing HIV infection rate in Asia and it is risking letting the infection get out of control,’ according to Steven Kraus, director of UN Aids Asia and the Pacific. The decision to scrap a plan to hand out condoms to school seniors and train teachers to counsel students on how to prevent pregnancies and sexually transmitted infections, was knocked down by the Roman Catholic Church and conservative politicians

February 28, 2017
The New York Times

Growing child labor in India's cities is just the tip of the iceberg, say activists

Urban India is employing an increasing number of children, many under nine years of age, who are producing everything from pickles to fireworks, working in tourism and labouring on building sites – a UN children’s agency report and campaigners say

February 27, 2017
Reuters

Women's charities welcome UK's first ambassador for gender equality

Britain has appointed the country’s first ambassador for gender equality, joining a growing band of countries globally to create such a role, in a move welcomed by women’s charities

February 28, 2017
Reuters

Women and child migrants raped, beaten and detained in Libyan 'hellholes': UNICEF

Armed groups have taken effective control of the detention centres for migrants and political chaos now reigns in Libya. These groups run their own centres, competing and cooperating with criminal gangs and smugglers, according to the United Nations

February 28, 2017
Reuters

E-therapy tied to better body image, intimacy for breast cancer survivors

Internet-based psychotherapy focused on changing behaviour may be tied to improved body image and sexual functioning in breast cancer survivors, a recent study suggests

March 2, 2017
Reuters

After Trump ban, Brussels pro-choice conference raises 181 million euros

A Brussels conference to finance global family planning initiatives raised 181m euros, after the U.S. halted such programmes, which had left NGOs worldwide with a large funding gap

March 2, 2017
Reuters

Children with HIV write to Modi after Cipla stops drug supplu over non-payment by government

A report in The Hindu said that stocks of Lopinavir syrup (an HIV drug that is child-friendly) were finished after Cipla stopped manufacturing it because of non-payments by the Indian health ministry

March 6, 2017
Outlook India

Women in India earn 25% less than men: Monster Salary Index

Women in India earn 25% less than men, according to the publication of the new Monster Salary Index

March 6, 2017
Times of India

India police find 19 fetuses dumped in plastic bags, suspect female feticide racket

Indian police found 19 aborted foetuses dumped in plastic bags in the western state of Maharashtra, while they investigated a woman’s death after an abortion. They believe they may have uncovered an inter-state female feticide racket, performing sex-selective abortions

March 6, 2017
Reuters

One in five believe women inferior to men: global survey

One in five people around the world believe women are inferior to men and should stay at home, and that men are more capable in the workplace and at school, a new global survey released for International Women’s Day has found

March 7, 2017
Reuters

'A child dies every two minutes' Emeli Sande makes charity plea

Singer Emeli Sande made a charity plea, after visiting a malaria-stricken Ugandan hospital for Comic Relief. UK TV presenter, Davina McCall, also visited a malaria hospital in Tanzania and followed suit

March 4, 2017
Daily Record
March 2, 2017
Irish Mirror

Companies back transgender rights in Supreme Court fight

A coalition of 53 companies backed transgender rights at the U.S. Supreme Court, signing on to a brief supporting a Virginia student who is fighting to use the school bathroom that corresponds to his gender identity

March 2, 2017
Reuters

Children of depressed mothers at risk for unintentional injuries

Children under the age of 5 are more likely to accidentally get injured if their mothers are having a depression or anxiety episode, according to a study in the UK. The rate of child poisonings, small fractures and minor burns increased during these episodes, researchers found

March 2, 2017
Reuters

Zika caused twenty-fold spike in birth defects -US study

U.S. researchers said that rates of microcephaly and other birth defects were 20 times higher in pregnancies affected by Zika, than in the years before the virus arrived in the Americas

March 2, 2017
Reuters
March 3, 2017
Fortune
March 4, 2017
The Atlantic
March 3, 2017
ABC news

Australian women at work: underpaid, discriminated against and told to be 'more confident'

Research released in advance for International Women’s Day shows that female managers in Australia earn, on average, $93,000 less than their male equivalents. Women are twice as likely to be told they need more ‘confidence’ to be a leader, yet are frequently criticized for being assertive, and finally, women who are culturally diverse are worse off than the rest of their female peers

March 2, 2017
The Guardian

Why have four children when you could have seven? Family planning in Niger

With the world’s highest birth rate, Niger’s population is set to double in 17 years. NGOs are providing contraception but what if women in society don’t mind having more children? 

March 15, 2017
The Guardian

Are some breast cancer patients getting too much radiation?

More than half of older American women with early breast cancer may be getting more radiation therapy than needed, which significantly boosts medical costs, a new study indicates

March 15, 2017
CBC News

Ireland must loosen abortion laws: Council of Europe rights commissioner

Ireland must loosen its strict abortion laws and replace them with a regime more respectful of women’s rights, the Council of Europe’s human rights commissioner said. Rules on terminating a pregnancy are among the world’s most restrictive and a referendum of widening access could be held if a citizens’ assembly set up by the government recommends it in a decision expected next month. Commissioner Nils Muiznieks said it has a chilling effect on doctors who must decide who meets the restrictive requirements

March 30, 2017
Reuters
March 29, 2017
Yahoo News

Study links oral clefts to maternal passive smoking

Use of tobacco can affect pregnant women even if they are not active users. Scientists say women exposed to second hand smoking during pregnancy are more likely to give birth to children with cleft lip or palate, a non-fatal congenital deformity. A new study found that 48% of mothers of children with oral cleft were exposed to second hand smoking compared to 24% of mothers of typical children. The authors of the study say there should be more research done in this field to learn more about this possible link

March 30, 2017
Times of India

Forged documents trap Indian children, help traffickers evade justice

In a two-year study of criminal networks trafficking girls from Bangladesh to India, the charity Justice and Care found that school leaving certificates were the most forged documents used by traffickers to hide the ages of their victims. Corrupt doctors and village leaders are helping traffickers to obtain fake documents to pass these child victims off as adults and evade justice for crimes affecting thousands of young people

March 31, 2017
Reuters

Myanmar trains midwives to tackle maternal death rate

Myanmar is training up hundreds of midwives in an effort to reduce the number of women who die in childbirth, one of the many social policy reforms launched by the country as it emerges from decades of military rule

April 1, 2017
Reuters

Kailash Satyarthi launches child rights campaign in Bangladesh

Nobel Laureate Kailash Satyarthi launched his child rights campaign in Bangladesh aimed at mobilizing millions of children from affluent families to speak up for their underprivileged peers. He said 100 million children were exposed to trafficking, slavery and other forms of violence while another 100 million youths want to change the world. Satyarthi said he describes his campaign as the globalization of compassion

April 2, 2017
Indian Express

Maternal mortality on the rise in Gujarat

The Comptroller and Auditor General of India stated that maternal mortality rates are on the rise in Gujarat and have been for the last three years. CAG found Gujarat’s healthcare system patchy at best fraught with many deficiencies and gaps. For instance, only 33% of women for post-natal care were provided with free transportation. CAG also found shortcomings in the storage of drugs, availability of blood, supply of free diet and diagnostic facilities

April 1, 2017
Indian Express
March 29, 2017
Yahoo News

Malnutrition, disease rise sharply among children in Somalia - UN

Early numbers show an increasing number of children in Somalia are suffering from Severe Acute Malnutrition (SAM) and cholera or acute watery diarrhoea, the UN warned. The UNHCR warned in a statement that children suffering from SAM are nine times more likely to die of disease than a well-nourished child, adding that during a 2011 famine the biggest killers were diarrhoea and measles

March 30, 2017
Agence Presse Africaine
March 31, 2017
China.org
March 30, 2017
China.org

Women in slums face greater heat risk

A recent study by the Indian Institute of Public Health Gandhinagar on women in various slum clusters in the city revealed their body temperatures rise sharply during peak summers. The rise is by three to four degrees, up to feverish levels. The most vulnerable groups included kite makers, rag pickers and street vendors who saw body temperatures rise by an average of 80%. More startling was women working indoors also had higher body temperatures, by a degree or two, compared to those outdoors. Constant exposure to heat and increases in mean body temperature is hazardous to a woman’s health and can lead to health issues

March 29, 2017
Times of India

A New Kind of Male Birth Control Is Coming

A new birth control method for men came a little closer after Indian researchers said they are preparing to submit it for regulatory approval after years of testing. Results say it’s safe, effective and easy to use, but it has gained no interest from drug makers. The reversible procedure could cost as little as $10 in poorer countries and may provide males with years of fertility control, overcoming compliance problems and avoiding associated  costs with condoms and the female birth control pill taken daily. It could also ease the burden on the 225m women in developing countries who have an unmet need for contraception. So far drug companies run by white males say ‘we’d never do it’ so its pick up for international markets is being held back

March 29, 2017
Bloomberg, Live Mint

With micro-credit and tricycles, disabled women confront stigma in Burkina Faso

Reuters features the story of the NGO Light of the World which has provided support for disabled women in Burkina Faso that has enabled them to build independence and develop opportunities for education, jobs, health and social services

March 30, 2017
Reuters

HPV vaccination during pregnancy shows no ill effects

New evidence from a Danish nationwide study suggests that Merck’s quadrivalent papillomavirus vaccine (HPV), marketed as Gardasil, is not dangerous in the unusual case when it is inadvertently given during early pregnancy

March 30, 2017
Reuters

Binge drinking prior pregnancy ups diabetes risk in kids later

A study finds that binge drinking before conceiving may lead to high blood sugar in kids, increasing the risk of developing diabetes in their adulthood. The researchers concluded the use of alcohol during pregnancy is well-known and includes possible birth defects and behavioural problems. The impact of binge drinking prior to pregnancy may have an effect too

April 3, 2017
Indian Express

Tanzania struggles to end child labor from the lure of gold

The Tanzanian government has signed all the major international conventions on child labour and introduced its own laws to prevent the worst types of child labour, but not everyone knows of these laws, including families and local officials. Government workers tasked with enforcing them lack the staff and funds for inspection, let alone pursue prosecutions

April 3, 2017
Reuters

Vaccine credited with HPV virus reduction in Scotland

A campaign to vaccinate girls against a cancer-causing sexually transmitted infection has led to a dramatic drop in reported cases. Researchers found a 90% fall in levels of human papilloma virus in Scottish women since the vaccine was made available in 2008. HPV virus types are thought to account for about 90% of cervical cancers. Researchers found just 0.5% of the women from a group born in 1995 tested positive for the virus, but in comparison, in women born before 1990 the percentage was 21.4%

April 5, 2017
BBC News, The Herald Scotland

Foundations launch road safety program to protect children

Two global foundations, FIA Foundation and Puma Energy Foundation, will support the NGO Amend to implement proven-effective road safety measures around high-risk primary schools in Accra. They will also work with national institutions to see the measures become more widely implemented across Ghana. WHO estimates that over 6,700 people are killed on Ghana’s roads each year and children are among the highest risk groups for road traffic injury

April 5, 2017
Joy Online

Parental smoking linked to genetic changes in kids with cancer

Parents who smoke may constitute to the genetic changes in their kids that are associated with the most common type of childhood cancer, a recent study suggests. The study links smoking by both parents to specific genetic changes in tumour cells of children with acute lymphoblastic leukaemia

April 6, 2017
Reuters

Malaria drug could cut women's risk of other infections

A drug used to combat malaria in pregnant women could also treat sexually transmitted infections a study shows. Results show that sulfadoxine-pyrimethamine can cut the risk of gonorrhoea, chlamydia, trichomoniasis and bacterial vaginosis

April 7, 2017
SciDev.net

Health department intensifies efforts to curb teen pregnancies

The latest shock statistics on pre-teen and teen pregnancies in South Africa revealed that 193 pupils in Grades 3,4 and 6 fell pregnant between 2014 and 2016. If school pupils from Grade 6 and 7 were added this number would jump to 1,449. The Department of Health acknowledged the issue and explained how it was intensifying its efforts to address this societal crisis

April 5, 2017
IOL

Late marriage of women may boost child’s health and well being

Reducing child marriages and delaying the marriage of younger women in India may have significant results in improving child health and educational outcomes, a study found

April 5, 2017
Indian Express

Progress uneven as global child death rates fall

Deaths among children and adolescents became less common between 1990 and 2015, but not all countries benefited equally from the improvements, according to a new analysis. Countries with low social and economic status shoulder a much larger child and adolescent mortality burden compared to countries with better income, education and fertility levels, researchers found, and the difference between the ‘best’ and the ‘worst’ is growing

April 3, 2017
Reuters, NPR

Egypt urged to end silence over female genital mutilation

Silence around female genital mutilation in Egypt is costing lives, campaigners warned on Tuesday ahead of the traditional ‘cutting season’ when thousands of girls are expected to undergo the ancient ritual. National data suggests almost 90% of girls and women in Egypt have undergone FGM; even though the practice was banned in 2008 it remains widespread. There has been mounting concern following the deaths of several girls during botched procedures, including a teenager who bled to death in a hospital last May

April 4, 2017
Reuters

Drought in Kenya brings a surprise: More girls in school

A recent safety net of cash transfer payments is helping persuade families that investing in girls makes good economic sense. Since 2013, the country’s Hunger Safety Net Programme, implemented by the government through the National Drought Management Authority is starting to show signs of progress

April 5, 2017
Trust.org

U.N. chief warns U.S. funding cut may have devastating effects

UN Secretary-General Antonio Guterres warned that a decision by the United States to withdraw all funding to the UN Population Fund (UNFPA) could have ‘devastating effects’ on vulnerable women and girls around the world. The U.S. State Department said it was dropping the funding because the UN Population Fund ‘supports, or participates in the management of, a programme of coercive abortion or involuntary sterilisation.’ A UN spokesperson said Guteress ‘believes that the decision is based on an inaccurate perception of the nature and importance of the work done by UNFPA’

April 4, 2017
Reuters
April 3, 2017
Reuters
April 4, 2017
Bloomberg
April 5, 2017
CNN

Equal Pay for Men and Women? Iceland Wants Employers to Prove It

This week Iceland became the first country to introduce legislation requiring employers to prove they are paying men  and women equally. Iceland has had equal pay laws for half a century, pushing companies and the government to gradually reduce the pay gap. The thinking behind the new legislation is that unless the laws are applied more forcefully, the imbalance may never close

March 28, 2017
New York Times

Uma criança morre no Iêmen a cada 10 minutos por doenças evitáveis

UNICEF’s Christoph Boulierac said ‘Millions are on the brink of famine in Yemen, more than two-thirds of the entire population are struggling to feed themselves and nearly half a million children are suffering from severe and acute malnutrition. The UN estimates that a child dies in Yemen every ten minutes from a preventable disease – but still the warring parties delay, obstruct or impede the delivery of humanitarian assistance’

March 28, 2017
UOL Brazil, Caracol.com Colombia, SABA Yemen News Agency

Despite murderous attacks, Tanzania's 'witches' fight for land

Thousands of elderly Tanzanian women have been strangled, knifed to death and burnt alive over the last two decades after being denounced as witches. The human rights coordinator for the Magu Poverty Eradication Rehabilitation Centre explained it was ‘a hidden agenda’ and the attacks have always all been about stealing their land 

March 21, 2017
Reuters, Mirror, Malay Mail

Growing runner beans to avert child marriage, trafficking in eastern India

A new state programme to keep young girls in school with cash incentives, coupled with efforts by land rights advocacy group Landesa to teach land literacy, help young girls dare to dream and plan for better futures

March 21, 2017
Reuters

Young Rohingya Mothers flee Persecution

The UN said the Myanmar army has committed mass killings, gang rapes and burned villages in a campaign that may amount to ethnic cleansing in Rakhine state and Rohingya, where families have been forced to flee for their lives

March 22, 2017
Jakarta Globe
March 21, 2017
International Business Times

India priests, decorators in child marriage crackdown: No proof of age? No wedding

Priests, card printers, flower decorators and tent suppliers are among the many players in the lucrative wedding industry being enlisted to help authorities in southern India crack down on child marriages. Priests in Telangana state have been told to request proof of age for the bride and groom before marrying them, while officials there are checking in villages to see if any child marriages are being planned or performed

March 21, 2017
Reuters

Beyond Roe v. Wade: Here’s What Gorsuch Means for Abortion

Neil Gorsuch’s confirmation to the Supreme Court reboots a 25 year campaign to chip away at abortion rights for women in the USA. But, as Bloomberg points out, it isn’t Roe versus Wade that will be at issue. It will be Planned Parenthood versus Casey, which was the fruit of a number of onerous lawsuits

March 20, 2017
Bloomberg

Burundi : 5 communes sur 119 ont interdit la défécation à l’air libre

In only 5 districts out of 119 in Burundi is it banned to defecate in the open air. In the remainder no ban is in place which becomes an important factor in encouraging the spread of diseases such as cholera

March 16, 2017
Burundi Agnews

Experimental blood test could speed autism diagnosis: U.S. study

Developers of an experimental blood test for autism say ‘it can detect the condition in more than 96% of the cases and so across a broad spectrum of patients, potentially allowing for earlier diagnosis,’ according to a new study

March 16, 2017
Reuters

How touch can shape babies’ brain development

A new study suggests that for new born babies, skin-to-skin contact with parents and caregivers may help shape how their brains respond to touch, a sense necessary for social and emotional connections 

March 17, 2017
Reuters

Health and behavior problems can linger after child abuse

Children who have suffered from abuse or neglect have physical or behavioural problems even after the mistreatment stops, new guidelines for U.S. paediatricians emphasize. Child mistreatment is seriously under reported and health care professionals need to be on the lookout for signs

March 20, 2017
Reuters

Protests against abortion bill in Angola

Some 200 demonstrators protested in Luanda against a draft law criminalizing all abortions, which is set to be voted on by parliament in the next few days. The proposed law punishes anyone who has an abortion, or performs one, with up to 10 years in prison

March 18, 2017
Deutsche Welle, Public Radio International
March 20, 2017
TVC News

DID YOU KNOW: 8,6 million women die due to CVD each year

According to the Heart and Stroke Foundation South Africa, heart disease accounts for a third of all female deaths, around 8.6m worldwide. One in four South African women will have some form of heart condition before the age of 60

March 27, 2017
Randfontein Herald

Child marriage soars in Yemen as famine looms: UN

Child marriage soars in Yemen as families struggle to feed their children amid a conflict that has left the country on the brink of famine, UNICEF said. Around 80% of all families in Yemen are in debt or are borrowing money to feed their children. Dowry payments are an additional incentive for poor parents to marry daughters off early and, as there is no minimum age for marriage, campaigners say girls sometimes as young as eight or nine are being married off

March 27, 2017
Reuters

Durex Wants to Break India's Condom-Buying Taboo

India has condom use of less than 6% in a country also battling the world’s third highest HIV burden. It also has more married women without family planning than any other country. Reckitt Benckiser Group is trying to counter that with its release in India of ‘Durex Jeans,’ two condom packs in packaging resembling the leather patches sewn on denim jeans and displayed in jar-like bowls on drugstore counters. The aim is to help consumers overcome the embarrassment of buying a product linked with sex, a taboo subject in conservative India

March 26, 2017
Bloomberg

Brasil fecha mais de 10 mil leitos pediátricos em seis anos

A survey by the Brazilian Society of Pediatrics (SBP) said more than 10 thousand pediatric beds in hospitals and clinics have disappeared from the public health network over the last seven years. In November last year there were 38,200 beds. In 2010, Brazil had 48,300 places for children who needed to stay in hospital overnight for more than 24 hours. The reduction in the number of beds has a direct impact on care causing delays in diagnosis in a population that is steadily growing in numbers

March 28, 2017
Gaucha Blogs

Global Warming Is a Matter of Survival for Pacific Islander Women

In some Pacific Island communities, due to rising sea levels, health centres and hospitals have been built on higher land making it difficult for a six-month pregnant woman to reach as she travels from island to island. Climate change in Papua New Guinea has contributed to mudslides and landslides, loss of food crops due to heavy rains or severe drought. Women are often at the sharp end of the impact of climate change. Flooding leads to lower food production which affects families and can lead to gender-based violence. Cash poverty and health risks increase

March 28, 2017
NBC News

'Khoon ka Rishta' campaign enables pregnant women in Bihar avoid anaemia

BBC Media Action India’s charity is working with women across eight districts in Bihar and giving them 180 iron and folic acid tablets to prevent anaemia, a similar number of blood-drop red stickers and a booklet and an outline of a baby for pasting in the stickers for every tablet consumed

March 26, 2017
ProKerala

Bid to reduce HIV infection in babies

Thai health authorities have set themselves the goal of cutting the transmission rate of HIV from mother to child to less than 1% within the next three years. The campaign includes preventative medical support measures in tandem with education and support on HIV prevention to pregnant women, via a series of campaigns

March 25, 2017
Bangkok Post

Contraceptive Pill Protects Against Some Cancers ‘For At Least 30 Years’

Researchers from the University of Aberdeen said women who take the contraceptive pill are protected from some types of cancer for as long as 30 years, according to a new study

March 22, 2017
Huffington Post, Telegraph, The Guardian

For Ugandan children, hunger and HIV make a deadly mix

Reuters reports that Ugandan children suffering from famine due to the drought that has hit the country’s farmers and devastated their crops, helps create a deadly mix. Children on anti-retroviral treatment to slow the development of HIV are suffering as the drugs won’t really take full effect without a nutritious diet to assist the body in processing them

March 22, 2017
Reuters, CNBC Africa

Nigeria loses 2,300 under five, 145 women of childbearing age daily

Because Nigeria loses about 2,300 under five year olds and 145 women of childbearing age daily, UNICEF has renewed its commitment to support the Nigerian health sector towards improving maternal and child health. To this end, it plans to strengthen immunization and revitalisation of the primary healthcare system in the country

March 22, 2017
Business Daily

How to fix war-torn societies? Help women to work

Experts say women as survivors of war are agents of change, and through that change they can empower both themselves and the whole community. These are not people sitting back waiting for food as refugees, back in their country of origin they were almost always incredibly resourceful, reasonably well educated and only setback by the loss of all their identity when they became a refugee. Empowerment turns a refugee into a champion for change

March 24, 2017
Reuters

Rural women lead fight against infant mortality in DR Congo

UNICEF and the Congolese government are providing all pregnant women and mothers with children under five with free health kits containing mosquito nets and basic medication to treat children for diarrhoea, fever and malnutrition. UNICEF is also teaching mothers how and when to use the kits and offering them vouchers to get treatment at the nearest health clinic for a nominal fee. The relative stability in Mbaza-Ngungu region of the DRC is one reason for the project’s relative success in what is otherwise a troubled healthcare system

March 23, 2017
Reuters

Zambia's poorest farmers risk becoming "squatters on their own land" – UN expert

Zambia’s smallholder farmers could be made squatters on their own land as the country opens up to farming multinationals in an effort to boost its economy, a UN expert said. Hilal Elever, UN Special Rapporteur on the right to food, said Zambia’s ambition to develop its commercial farming sector to become Southern Africa’s food basket risks worsening extreme rural poverty as farmers may face eviction to make way. Such plans need to place the social and economic impact on people at the centre and not just focus on short term profitability and economic growth 

May 12, 2017
Reuters

New Beijing Chief Vows to Finally Win Fight Against Pollution

Beijing’s new top official vowed to tackle the city’s smog problem, a simmering cause of discontent among China’s expanding middle class. Cai Qi, the Communist Party chief in the capital, told a gathering of local delegates that the metropolis of 22 million must slash pollution levels to “win the battle against pollution.” He pledged to cut levels of the most hazardous airborne particulate by 30 percent over the next five years, while pushing polluters and “non-essential” services out to “display the image of a major country’s capital city”

June 19, 2017
Bloomberg

Bangkok struggles to protect slum dwellers as floods worsen

Squatter communities along canals are no strangers to floods - but they are happening more often, and the concerns of the urban poor are being overlooked, say experts. As Thailand`s rainy season gets underway, residents in and around Bangkok say they are experiencing more intense and frequent seasonal floods since 2011, when the capital was hit by its worst flooding in half a century. Experts do not expect floods of that magnitude again any time soon but say the city`s low-lying location, continued urbanisation and extreme weather linked to climate change are raising Bangkok`s vulnerability to floods

June 19, 2017
Trust.org

Wombs for rent: Indian surrogacy clinic confines women in "terrible conditions", say police

Police raided an illegal fertility clinic in southern India at the weekend and discovered 47 surrogate mothers - who had been lured to rent their wombs for money - living in "terrible conditions", they said. "They were mostly migrants from north eastern states who had been brought here through agents and promised up to 400,000 rupees (around $6,000)." India`s surrogacy industry has come under attack from women`s rights groups who say such clinics are "baby factories" for the rich, and lack of regulation results in poor and uneducated women signing contracts they do not fully understand

June 19, 2017
Trust.org

Humanitarian aid hits record $27.3bn, but Middle East donors cut contributions

International humanitarian aid hit a record $27.3 billion last year, but several leading donors in the Middle East slashed their contributions, data showed. Although total assistance rose for a fourth consecutive year, the pace of growth slowed, UK-based research organisation Development Initiatives said. One factor behind the slowdown may have been the lack of any sudden large scale disaster such as the 2015 Nepal earthquake or 2014 West African Ebola epidemic

June 20, 2017
Trust.org
June 21, 2017
Trust.org

Caring like a kangaroo: India can cut neonatal death toll, world’s highest

Although the rate of neonatal mortality in India has declined from 52 per 1,000 live births in 1990 to 28 in 2013, the rate of decline has been slower than that of infant and under-five mortality. One of the best low-cost interventions that can save lives with babies younger than four weeks who die every year is regular skin contact, like kangaroo mothers – an expert said

June 20, 2017
Hindustan Times

NGO to launch water initiative in Kibera

A Non-Governmental Organization is set to embark on a sustainable water project that is expected to transform Kibera and vastly improve the quality of life of residents there. According to the Nourafchan Foundation (TNF) the initiative will be commissioned during its inaugural community celebration, with this year’s theme titled ‘The Big Splash’. “Until recently Kibera’s only source was the Nairobi dam whose unsanitary waters are rife with infections like typhoid and cholera,” the NGO said

June 20, 2017
CapitalFM Kenya

Teach the fathers of tomorrow to keep girls in school today, study shows

The Asante Africa Foundation said girls` attendance increased by 80 percent in Kenyan and Tanzanian schools where its project taught about 9,000 adolescent girls, 3,000 mothers and 500 boys about problems like teenage pregnancy and domestic violence. "If we want to ensure that the next generation of women are given the chance to receive a quality education then we must train our boys to be champions for girls` equality," Erna Grasz, founder of the U.S.-based charity, said

June 19, 2017
Trust.org

Early weather forecasts key to saving lives in drought - U.N.

With droughts set to become more frequent due to global warming, delivering timely, long-term weather forecasts to farmers in the developing world will be key to limiting damage and saving lives, the head of the U.N. food agency said. Better access to reliable weather data and early warning systems could help farmers in rural areas get ready to endure long spells of no rain, said FAO director-general Jose Graziano da Silva. "Most of the times poor rural communities in developing countries don`t even know that a drought is about to strike," he added

June 19, 2017
Trust.org

Break silence on 'terrifying' femicides in Dominican Republic - minister

The wave of femicides in the Caribbean nation is "terrifying", said Janet Camilo, the country`s minister for women. So far this year, 43 women have been killed in gender-based killings and six femicides have been reported this month alone, according to latest police figures, Camilo said. Victims of femicide usually have a history of suffering domestic violence and killers are often the victims` current or former partners, sometimes motivated by jealously or because a woman has refused to go back with an ex-boyfriend, activists say

June 16, 2017
Trust.org

Nepal court demands quick compensation for acid attack victims

Nepal`s Supreme Court, in response to a petition by rights group Forum for Women, Law and Development (FWLD), last month ordered the government to amend the law to ensure victims of acid attacks and burning receive immediate compensation and critical care. There are about 40 reported cases of burns and acid attacks every year in Nepal, with nearly three-quarters of the victims women, according to New York-based charity Donor Direct Action, citing non-profit Burns Violence Survivors Nepal

June 16, 2017
Trust.org

For women in Kenya's dry north, water is power

A new way of funding climate change projects at the local level is giving women more say over the use of precious resources. Ahmed Abdi, CEO of Arid Lands Development Focus Kenya (ALDEF Kenya), said women now have a chance to influence decisions that affect their livelihoods, particularly on issues of grazing pastures and water thanks to the Wajir’s Climate Change Fund

June 16, 2017
Trust.org

Exclusive: Priti Patel insists UK's aid influence is 'massive'

Britain’s foreign aid minister, Priti Patel, has told the Guardian she is fed up with the myth that all she does is sit at her desk “writing cheques to North Korea”, in her most robust response yet to critics of the foreign aid budget. Patel said it was UK investment in “resilience” and the early lead taken by Department for International Development which put £110m into Somalia in January and persuaded the World Bank to add another £40m – which had kept the death rate down

June 18, 2017
The Guardian

The ‘rainbow village’ hoping to improve mental health in Kabul

The Kabul authorities are painting houses bright colours in order to give a new lease of life to the area - and improve residents` mental health. The Kabul city administration has taken this aesthetic and run with it, launching a project to paint the exteriors of nearly 2000 houses on the western-facing hills of Kabul. There was a significant uptick in mental health amongst the young of Santa Marta, one of Rio de Janeiro’s favelas, when a similar campaign was launched. Another village — Kampung Pelangi in Indonesia — has become an Instagram sensation with its transformation into a Rainbow Village

June 18, 2017
Independent

Nearly 1,300 U.S. kids die from gunshot wounds each year

Firearms kill almost 1,300 American youngsters each year, and boys and black children are most often the victims, a U.S. study finds. During the 13-year study, more than half of the gun-related deaths were homicides, while 38 percent were suicides and 6 percent were fatalities from accidental gun injuries, researchers report in Pediatrics. Each year, guns seriously wounded about 5,800 additional kids under 18. “Firearm injuries are a leading cause of death among U.S. children aged 1 to 17 years and contribute substantially each year to premature death, illness and disability of children,” said lead study author Katherine Fowler of the U.S. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) in Atlanta

June 19, 2017
Reuters
June 20, 2017
Reuters

Indian police thwart indigenous people in land complaints, activists say

Indigenous people in central India are thwarted by police when trying to file complaints about their land being forcefully taken, activists say, highlighting the enormous challenges they face in securing their land rights. More than 80 tribal men and women in Chhattisgarh state who say they were coerced, threatened and duped into giving up their land, could not file First Information Reports last week in Raigarh city. "They didn`t even realise they no longer owned their land, or who the new owners were. That is why it took them so long to approach the police, who are always resistant to filing FIRs in these matters," Sudha Bharadwaj, a rights lawyer, said

June 19, 2017
Trust.org

India submits report on sustainable development goals to UN

The review is centred around the goals of ending poverty and hunger, and ensuring healthy lives, besides achieving gender equality, building resilient infrastructure, etc. On ending poverty in all its forms, it said there was compelling evidence that the rapid growth India has achieved following the economic reforms in 1991 had led to significant reduction in poverty. The report cited Mahatma Gandhi National Rural Employment Guarantee Act to emphasise that over two billion person-days of employment were generated during 2016-17 alone, largely for the disadvantaged sections of society

June 20, 2017
Business Standard

EU response to the 2030 Agenda for Sustainable Development – a sustainable European future

The Council calls on the Commission to set out by mid-2018 an implementation strategy with timelines, objectives and concrete measures to implement the 2030 Agenda in all EU policies. The Commission should also identify by mid-2018 gaps where the EU needs to do more by 2030 in the areas of policy, legislation, governance structures for horizontal coherence and implementation

June 20, 2017
Consilium Europa

Hotline, 'gender champions' tackle violence against girls in drought-hit Kenya

A group of women and men – drawn from community members, police officers, journalists, health workers, and non-governmental organisations, among others – have set up a gender support desk and hotline in Wajir for victims of violence. Once a girl calls the toll-free number, the group alerts a local colleague or police officer, who investigates the accusation while providing the victim with moral and medical support. If the allegation is found to be substantiated and the victim is willing to come forward, the gender desk helps her bring the case to court. The initiative, which is part of the Building Resilience and Adaptation to Climate Extremes and Disasters (BRACED) programme, is funded by the UK Department for International Development (DFID) and led by Mercy Corps

June 21, 2017
Trust.org

Conflict, drought push "unprecedented" 81 million into food aid - study

Prolonged conflicts and droughts have left an unprecedented 81 million people needing food aid in 2017, a specialist U.S.-based agency said, revising up its earlier estimates. People in 45 countries are unable to feed themselves, said the Famine Early Warning Systems Network (FEWS NET), which issues alarms about food shortages to the U.S. government. "Additional contributions to emergency appeals, particularly in these four countries, are urgently needed to prevent large-scale loss of life," FEWS NET said

June 21, 2017
Trust.org

U.N. glimpses into blockchain future with eye scan payments for refugees

Thousands of Syrian refugees in Jordan`s Azraq camp don`t pay for their food with cash but by a scan of their eyes. Purchases are then recorded on a computing platform based on block chain - the technology behind bitcoin. Iris recognition devices at the checkouts of the camp`s supermarket authenticate customers` identities and deduct what they spend from sums they receive as aid from the World Food Programme. The U.N. agency launched the futuristic system in May as a one-month pilot involving 10,000 of Azraq`s more than 50,000 inhabitants in a bid to explore block chain`s potential to cut costs and bottlenecks

June 21, 2017
Trust.org
June 20, 2017
Trust.org

The World Bank reinvents itself – and puts poverty reduction at risk

The World Bank’s relationship with US president Donald Trump has raised concerns about its political neutrality in recent weeks, but a larger and potentially much more important shift in how the Bank operates is underway.” “The World Bank” say many academics and policy analysts, “is reinventing itself, from a lender for major development projects, to a broker for private sector investment.” “De-risking” entire countries for private sector investors is likely to include policies such as strict inflation controls, large-scale privatisations, rapid trade liberalisation and strong government cutbacks on social spending. These have in the past made World Bank lending activities notoriously destructive for developing countries

June 21, 2017
Sierra Leone Telegraph

United States rejects U.N. call for access to safe abortions

The United States has rejected a United Nations resolution on violence against women because it called for access to safe abortion for all women in countries where legal. The administration of President Donald Trump said last month it was vastly expanding the scope of a policy blocking U.S. assistance to foreign groups that perform or provide information about abortions. U.S. First Secretary to the U.N. in Geneva Jason Mack said, after a resolution from Canada on eliminating violence against women was adopted by consensus, that the U.S. "must dissociate from the consensus" specifically on access to safe abortions

June 22, 2017
Reuters

India builds game-changing database to track human trafficking

A charity in New Delhi is building India`s first online database of human trafficking cases in a bid to plug a massive information gap and help law enforcers clean up the epicentre of the modern slave trade. "After inputting details from court records into the database, we will for the first time be able to analyse everything from the profile of traffickers, their modus operandi and the types of trafficking, to the quality of police investigations and the quantum of sentences being handed down," the charity’s head said

June 22, 2017
Trust.org

From floods to disease, disaster risk rising in surging African cities

Disaster risks are arguably rising faster in sub-Saharan Africa than anywhere else, said Arabella Fraser, a risk and resilience researcher at the Overseas Development Institute (ODI). That`s in part the result of surging urban populations, a quickening pace of climate-related problems - such as flooding and drought - and an inability to beat back those risks because of poverty, poor data, lack of training and badly run government, she said. One thing that can help is ensuring that efforts to build urban resilience are not just short-term, donor-funded projects but are based on community demand and then built into city plans, often with innovative funding

June 22, 2017
Trust.org

Suburban docs and parents are OK talking about food insecurity

In 2015 and 2016, researchers had healthcare providers at six doctors` offices in suburban Philadelphia screen for food insecurity when parents brought children for their 2-month, 15-month and 36-month check-ups. Altogether, the parents of 5,645 children were asked two questions: Had they ever run out of food for their family in the past year and had they ever worried about running out of food. About 77 percent of the families were successfully screened. About 3 percent answered yes to one of the two questions. With their permission, those families were connected with a non-profit organization that helps people apply for government food assistance programs

June 20, 2017
Reuters

Lives in limbo: Why Japan accepts so few refugees

Despite being one of the most generous government donors to the United Nations High Commissioner for Refugees (UNHCR) - Japan was ranked the fourth biggest contributor in 2016 after the US, the EU and Germany - it has long been closed to immigration and reluctant to accept refugees. In 2016, a record 10,901 people applied or appealed rejected asylum claims, with the highest number of applicants coming from Indonesia, Nepal, the Philippines and Turkey. Japan accepted 28, or less than one percent of applicants

June 20, 2017
Aljazeera

Placing gender equity in Stem on the radar

The skills shortage in science, technology, engineering and maths is deepening. There are plenty of jobs in the industry, but there are not enough people to fill the roles. The problem is, to a significant extent, caused by the failure of Stem to attract women. Fewer than 25 per cent of people working in Stem are female. Policy-makers have come to recognise that this is more than an issue of equality, and that the lack of female participation in Stem leads not only to a reduced labour pool but also to a world where technology and science is primarily made by men for men

June 20, 2017
Irish Times

No modification on ban on insecticide spraying onboard: NGT

The National Green Tribunal has refused to modify its direction banning spray of disinfectants in aircraft while passengers are on board saying there was no “apparent error” in its earlier order. A vacation bench headed by Justice U D Salvi declined to review its August 2015 order and junked the submission that spraying of Permethrin insecticide in the plane while the passengers are onboard does not cause harm to human health

June 20, 2017
Indian Express

CRISPR pioneer Jennifer Doudna on gene editing’s potential for good and evil

CRISPR gives scientists the power to radically and irreversibly alter the biosphere by providing a way to rewrite the very molecules of life any way we wish. There needs to be more discussions of the possibilities it presents for good and for ill. However, even though it is still a thrilling moment for life sciences, we all have a responsibility to consider any ramifications in advance and engage in an inclusive conversation about how to harness gene editing in a natural world context

June 20, 2017
Fast Company

A Step Back for Gender Equality in the Board Room

Just under 28 percent of the 431 open board seats in Fortune 500 companies were awarded to women in 2016, down from 30 percent the year before. In today`s "Walk the Talk," Bloomberg`s Jeff Green takes a look at gender equality in the board room

June 20, 2017
Bloomberg

Northern Cape teachers are literally sick and tired and considering leaving the profession

A report by the Human Sciences Research Council indicates that absenteeism of 20 days or more was highest among teachers in the Northern Cape, with 28.4 percent of teachers in the Province off sick for more than 20 days last year. “An increase in self-reported NCDs is now evident, suggesting an increased level of morbidity in this population. However, teachers’ personal problems also influence absenteeism,” the report states. The overall HIV prevalence among teachers in South Africa was 15.3 percent, translating to approximately 58,000 teachers living with HIV in South Africa

June 20, 2017
IOL
June 15, 2017
IOL

U.S: New York Governor Signs Anti-Child Marriage Law

New York State has taken an important step toward ending child marriage, as Governor Andrew Cuomo on June 20, 2017 signed legislation to dramatically reduce the circumstances under which children can marry, Human Rights Watch said. Between 2001 to 2010, 3,850 children under 18 married in New York State. Under the previous law, the minimum age for marriage in New York was 18, but the law allowed children of 16 and 17 to marry with parental approval, and children of 14 and 15 to marry with permission from a judge and their parents. The vast majority of US states permit marriage under age 18 under some circumstances. In 27 US states, there is no limit to how young a child can marry if a judge authorizes the marriage

June 20, 2017
Human Rights Watch, NBC New York

Venezuelan congress says $200 million wasted on low-income food packs

A commission of Venezuela`s opposition-controlled congress said the government overpaid $206 million for food imported from Mexico, stepping up criticism of its handling of a scarcity crisis that charities said is causing more malnutrition. The congress` inspection commission said that between January and June the government bought 7 million boxes of basic foods like rice and cooking oil imported from Mexico by middlemen, paying 55 percent above market prices. "This government is addicted to corruption. Not even the hunger of Venezuelans stops it creating new ways to steal," lawmaker Carlos Paparoni said

June 16, 2017
Trust.org

Africa eyes green jobs to fight radicalisation and stem migration to Europe

African governments have pledged to restore degraded land, invest in agriculture and create "green jobs" for young people in a drive to tackle youth unemployment, fight against radicalisation, and stem the tide of migration to Europe. The presidents of Burkina Faso, Mali and Niger and ministers from several other African nations met to discuss sustainability and security on the continent, and the need to create land-based jobs for the booming youth population. Climate shocks, deteriorating land and a lack of development are driving many young Africans to risk their lives trying to reach Europe, and pushing others into extremist groups, says the United Nations Convention to Combat Desertification

June 16, 2017
Trust.org

Delaware is first U.S. state to enact abortion rights law under Trump

Delaware`s governor has signed into law a bill ensuring abortion remains legal in the state, the first such move in the United States since President Donald Trump was elected on a pledge to overturn a landmark ruling that legalized abortion nationally. A spokesman for Democratic Governor John Carney Jr. said he supported the rights and protections afforded under Roe v. Wade, a 1973 Supreme Court decision protecting a woman`s right to abortion. "For that reason, he signed the bill into law," said the spokesman, Jonathan Starkey, noting that the law takes effect immediately

June 9, 2017
Reuters

Deadly protests in India highlight despair of poor landless farmers

The killing of five farmers in clashes with police in central India exposes the plight of landless peasants struggling to pay back debt with meagre earnings from lower produce prices, activists say. Low prices for produce such as lentils and cereals amid a glut in supply have triggered protests by farmers in central Madhya Pradesh state and neighbouring Maharashtra, where officials have said they will waive loans of some defaulting farmers. But the waivers will only benefit farmers who own land and do not address the main reasons for farmers` distress including landlessness and the small size of holdings, said Kishor Tiwari, head of a committee set up by the Maharashtra government to address farmers` issues

June 9, 2017
Trust.org

China's $10 billion strategic project in Myanmar sparks local ire

Myanmar`s Kyauk Pyu port is key to China`s "Belt and Road" plans as an entry point for the pipeline that gives China an alternative route for Middle East oil and is part of the nearly $10 billion Kyauk Pyu Special Economic Zone, a scheme at the heart of fast-warming Myanmar-China relations and whose success is crucial for Aung San Suu Kyi. Internal documents show up to 20,000 people may be relocated. Although the Chinese developer claims the project will create 100,000 new jobs, few of the villagers suffering from relocation have been able to land work on this project. Suspicion of China runs deep in Myanmar, and public hostility due to environmental and other concerns has delayed or derailed Chinese mega-projects in the country in the past

June 9, 2017
Trust.org

Ethiopia, humanitarian groups say food aid for 7.8 mln to run out

Ethiopia will run out of emergency food aid for nearly 8 million people hit by severe drought by the end of this month, the government and humanitarian groups said. In Ethiopia, the number of people now critically short of food is expected to rise by at least two million by next month, according to figures compiled by the government and its humanitarian partners

June 10, 2017
Trust.org, ITV

Why Safe Drinking Water Should Be At The Centre Of Public Health Policy In India

India, with the second largest population in the world, is staring at a major health hazard due to poor drinking water and hygiene facilities. According to a report by Water Aid (2016), India has the highest number of people in the world without access to safe drinking water. The delinking of safe drinking water from public health policy, thus, has led to the state`s failed response in making potable water available for all

June 11, 2017
Huffington Post

The weaker sex? Science that shows women are stronger than men

When it comes to longevity, surviving illness and coping with trauma, one gender comes out on top – women. The Guardian profiles scientists working on studies to find out

June 11, 2017
The Guardian

Cry for Venezuela

Not so long ago, Venezuela enjoyed a semblance of comfort, security and hope; The Globe and Mail’s Stephanie Nolen reports that it is now a shambles, the people suffering from inadequate health care, food shortages – and government that appears to be looking out for its own, sometimes brutally

June 9, 2017
Globe and Mail

Gay Chinese battle inertia, conservatism to push rights

When Chinese sexologist Li Yinhe was looking for top-level government support for same-sex marriage in the early 2000s, she asked the then mayor of Beijing, Wang Qishan, a friend, for help, after decades of Communist prudery about sex of all kinds, during recent years of economic reform and growth, gay Chinese have sprung forward to reclaim the country`s long history of relative tolerance towards homosexuality. With no clear, bureaucratic way forward to legalise same-sex marriage, unlike in Taiwan which approved the step last month, and deeply conservative attitudes among the older generation towards sex, gay Chinese are pushing against old social norms and legal uncertainty to assert their rights

June 7, 2017
Trust.org

Deadly heatwaves surge in India, with worse ahead, researchers say

Increasingly scorching summer heat in India is leading to a big jump in heatwave deaths – and much worse is likely on the way, researchers said. A modest 0.5 degree Celsius rise in average temperatures in India over the last 50 years has led to a nearly 150 percent hike in heatwaves that kill at least 100 people, said researchers at the University of California in Irvine. But with India now on a path to between 2.2 and 5.5 degrees Celsius of temperature rise by the end of the century, the rate of heatwave deaths in India – and other Asian nations – could soar

June 7, 2017
Reuters
June 8, 2017
Bloomberg

Do antidepressants in pregnancy raise kids’ ADHD risk?

Women with depression may be more likely than other mothers to have children with attention-deficit/hyperactivity disorder (ADHD) even if they don’t take antidepressants during pregnancy, a recent study suggests. The results indicate that at least part of the link previously seen between kids’ exposure to antidepressants during pregnancy and their risk of developing ADHD may be explained by “family factors” such as maternal depression, rather than the drugs themselves, the study authors write in The BMJ

June 7, 2017
Reuters

Plastic to outweigh fish in the sea if waste keeps flowing

Internationally, significant efforts are being made to remove plastic from the world`s water bodies: one example is "The Ocean Cleanup", a Dutch foundation formed after a speech by a concerned Dutch teenager went viral online. It aims to clear over half of the "Great Pacific Garbage Patch", an area between Hawaii and California where ocean currents have concentrated plastic debris. Last month, the Ellen MacArthur Foundation and the Prince of Wales` International Sustainability Unit launched a $2-million prize to come up with new ways to design packaging to help keep plastics out of the ocean

June 8, 2017
Trust.org

'Wombs for rent' business flourishes in communist Laos

Dozens of fertility clinics have mushroomed in land-locked Laos after scandals over commercial surrogacy have spurred wealthier southeast Asian neighbours to ban the controversial procedure since 2015. Rights groups say communist Laos, one of Asia`s poorest countries, is a linchpin of transnational crime, and a transit centre for contraband from drugs and wildlife to timber - and recently, semen. Paid surrogacy is illegal in much of Asia, having been forbidden in neighbouring Thailand in 2015, after a series of high-profile cases, with Cambodia following suit last year. Despite the bans, would-be parents are drawn by Asia`s lower costs, as compared to wealthier countries

June 8, 2017
Reuters

Nigerian shelter shrugs off attacks to save girls from marriage and street work

The Thomson Reuters Foundation News looks at the Yola, Nigeria Charity Centre for Women and Adolescent Empowerment that has been repeatedly attacked for offering help to thousands of girls and women. The Centre also supports parents, giving them money so they can send their daughters to school rather than making them sell wares on the streets or marrying them off in the predominantly Muslim city. UNICEF data says at least four in ten girls in Nigeria are married before they turn 18, while almost a fifth are wed before fifteen

June 8, 2017
Trust.org

Even low arsenic levels in water tied to small, preterm babies

Low levels of arsenic naturally found in drinking water in many US states are associated with an increased risk of premature and underweight babies, a study in Ohio suggests. In counties where less than 10 percent of the population used private wells, arsenic in public drinking water was associated with 14 percent higher odds of very low birth weight babies and 10 percent higher odds of premature deliveries, researchers report in Environmental Research. The study found negative birth outcomes even when women lived in counties where tap water might expose them to arsenic levels below 10 micrograms per litre (10 ug/L), the maximum amount considered safe by the EPA

June 8, 2017
Reuters

'No place for the poor' in India's Smart Cities, campaigners say

Prime Minister Narendra Modi`s Smart Cities Mission aims to modernise 100 cities by 2020. An ambitious government plan to upgrade India`s cities risks further marginalising poor and minority communities and hastening slum evictions, while failing to address the reasons villagers move to urban areas, campaigners said. The $7.5 billion plan does not address the needs and rights of poor women and marginalised groups including minorities and migrants, according to a report by New Delhi-based advocacy group Housing and Land Rights Network, India (HLRN). The drive for Smart Cities has already triggered evictions of people from slums and informal settlements in cities including Indore, Bhubaneswar, Delhi and Kochi without adequate compensation or alternate accommodation

June 12, 2017
Trust.org

Aid agencies urged to help prevent child labour during crises

Syrian refugee children in Lebanon are doing back-breaking labour in potato fields and working with pesticides in baking hot greenhouses, a UN agency said as it called for greater efforts to prevent child labour during crises. "We are trying to help aid agencies working on food security and nutrition to be more child labour sensitive and to have the risks at least on their radar," FAO child labour expert Ariane Genthon said. There are an estimated 168 million child labourers worldwide, 98 million of whom work in agriculture

June 12, 2017
Trust.org

Abortion: NI women not entitled to NHS terminations in England

The UK`s highest court has rejected an appeal by a mother and daughter in their legal battle for women from Northern Ireland to receive free abortions on the NHS in England. Terminations are only permitted if a woman`s life is at risk, or there is a permanent or serious risk to her mental or physical health; rape, incest and fatal foetal abnormalities are not circumstances in which abortions can be performed legally in Northern Ireland. Last year, more than 700 women from Northern Ireland travelled to England for an abortion, according to UK Department of Health figures

June 14, 2017
BBC, The Guardian, Trust.org

Medical app aims to tackle rape, flag war crimes in conflict-torn Congo

Activists behind an app designed to assist doctors document evidence of sexual violence in the Democratic Republic of Congo aim to go beyond obtaining justice for rape victims and collect data which could help secure prosecutions for war crimes. Developed by Physicians for Human Rights (PHR), MediCapt allows clinicians to record medical examination results digitally and photograph victims` injuries, store them online and send them directly to law enforcement officials and lawyers

June 14, 2017
Trust.org

Many rape victims experience 'paralysis' during assault

Many sexual assault victims experience an involuntary inability to move during rape, and those who do are more likely to later develop posttraumatic stress disorder (PTSD) and depression, Swedish researchers say. “Victims tend to blame themselves for not resisting, so the fact that 7 out of 10 have paralysis is useful to know,” said lead study author Dr. Anna Moller. Past studies indicate that humans can similarly feel paralyzed when under attack or in other life-threatening circumstances, experiencing temporary, involuntary immobility that may also involve a dissociated, catatonic-like mental state. “In court situations, a lot of focus is given to whether the victim consented to the intercourse or not,” Moller said. “This paralysis and passiveness should not be considered consent”

June 15, 2017
Reuters

U.N. rights expert urges Myanmar to protect detained Rohingya children

Myanmar should guarantee the rights and medical care of children from the Rohingya Muslim minority detained in an army crackdown launched in October, a U.N. human rights investigator said. Speaking at the U.N. Human Rights Council in Geneva, Yanghee Lee said children should not be "arbitrarily deprived of their liberty" and she urged the government to investigate the death of a child who, according to the government, died because of ill health in February. The government did not report the death until last week, she said

June 15, 2017
Trust.org

Migrants sent home $445 billion in 2016, lifting millions out of poverty - report

Migrants working in rich countries sent home almost half a trillion dollars in 2016, helping to lift families out of poverty by providing financial stability, access to education, housing and healthcare, according to a global report. The total amount of remittances, which is estimated to reach $450 billion in 2017, has risen by more than 50 percent in the past decade, IFAD said. Total migrant worker earnings are estimated to be $3 trillion annually, of which approximately 85 percent remains in the host countries. The money migrants send home averages less than one percent of their host country`s gross domestic product, IFAD said

June 14, 2017
Trust.org

Mangroves, coral reefs could cut flood insurance premiums - Lloyd's

Natural coastal habitats such as mangroves, coral reefs and salt marshes protect communities more effectively against coastal storms than seawalls, and insurers should consider this when pricing flood risk, Lloyd`s of London said. Investment to protect natural habitats also makes sense for insurers, a report written for Lloyd`s said, though 30 times more is currently spent around the world on building seawalls than conserving coastal infrastructure

June 13, 2017
Trust.org

Aid groups seek to turn on funding tap to douse drought crises

The Start Network, funded by the British, Dutch and Irish governments, is putting together a new financing facility to enable a faster and more coordinated response to droughts, and plans to test its model in Pakistan and Zimbabwe. The "drought financing facility" aims to combine contingency funds, insurance and new modelling technology to shift humanitarian response from reaction to anticipation, a spokeswoman said. "This will save more lives, livelihoods and assets, and significantly reduce costs”

June 12, 2017
Trust.org

Sustainable Development Goals for environment and health are within Europe’s reach, but we nee...

Each year, nearly one and a half million Europeans die prematurely from polluted environments; that is at least 15% of total deaths in Europe. Countries have to strategically streamline beneficial environment and health policies across their SDG priorities. This means investing in health promoting and smart, green urban planning and sustainable transport systems, including public transportation, cycling lanes, pedestrian zones and green spaces. It also means developing new and adopting latest technologies, for example, in energy generation, water reuse, waste management, elimination of informal waste collection and reducing the environmental footprint of the health sector

June 12, 2017
Trust.org

Falling cocoa prices threaten child labour spike in Ghana, Ivory Coast

A drop in global cocoa prices threatens to undermine efforts to stamp out child labour in Ghana and Ivory Coast, the world`s two biggest growers, as falling incomes could force farmers to send their children to work, charities said. "If these low prices translate into lower incomes for poor families, and household poverty gets worse, we are worried that the risk of child labour will increase," Nick Weatherill, executive director of ICI, explained. Children could be taken out of school if their families can no longer pay the costs, and many may be made to work on cocoa farms if growers cannot afford to employ labourers, he added

June 12, 2017
Trust.org

Climate fund criticized by Trump has slow, complex start

The $10 billion Green Climate Fund that US President Donald Trump said was a waste of tax dollars has fallen behind on its goals, with a biggest pay out so far of just $5 million for a US-led solar energy project. Work at the international fund, which aims to help poor nations cut greenhouse gas emissions and adapt their economies to heatwaves, storms and rising seas has been slowed by legal red tape and the approval process, board members say. The fund also faces legal complexities in starting to work with multilateral lenders such as the World Bank, the Asian Development Bank or private banks. Once agreements are in place, a flood of disbursements is expected to follow

June 13, 2017
Trust.org

Maasai manure helps Kenya's drought-hit herders fight hunger

Demand for manure collected from Kenya`s rangelands for use as fertiliser is on the rise. Scientists at the Nairobi-based International Centre of Insect Physiology and Ecology (ICIPE) say this manure is richer in nitrogen and phosphorous than that from enclosed livestock which do not graze. Crops need nitrogen to develop vegetation, while phosphorous is essential for root formation and the crop`s structure, said Edward Karanja, project leader with ICIPE, and there is big potential in the manure trade because more Kenyans are investing in agriculture

June 13, 2017
Trust.org

Women abused by partners suffer lifelong health problems – study

The first long-term Australian study to investigate the impact of partner violence, researchers found those who have survived abuse ‘recorded significantly poorer health.’ Abused women suffer significant physical and mental health problems that persist throughout their lifetime. While health is expected to worsen as people age, the physical functioning and general health of women, who experienced intimate partner violence, was consistently worse than those who had not experienced it

June 13, 2017
Guardian

Record hunger in Horn of Africa pushes development banks to step in

In an unprecedented move, the World Bank is giving $50 million to the International Committee of the Red Cross (ICRC) and the UN Food and Agriculture Organization to distribute emergency food, water and cash in Somalia. The African Development Bank (ADB) has also announced $1.1 billion to combat drought in six countries, mostly in the Horn of Africa. In a "Grand Bargain", struck at last year`s World Humanitarian Summit, donors promised to make their funding more flexible to respond to growing humanitarian crises globally

June 13, 2017
Trust.org

Haiti orphanages hotspot of child trafficking, abuse, says charity

Children living in hundreds of orphanages in Haiti suffer sexual and physical abuse and some are trafficked into orphanages for profit, according to a charity founded by author J.K. Rowling. Many of Haiti`s orphanages use deception to recruit children from unknowing and impoverished parents - a form of trafficking - and use those children to attract donations, said the report released by the London-based charity Lumos. In some cases, families had been paid $75 to give their children away, the report said

June 22, 2017
Trust.org

Afghan women refugees resurrected as India's plastic waste warriors

Employed under "Project Patradya" - an initiative led by Delhi University students - Afghan refugee women produce and supply edible bowls, cups and cutlery to cafes and ice-cream parlours as an alternative to non-biodegradable plastic ones. Made from millet and wheat flour, the biscuit-like tableware is gaining popularity in the West as a sustainable, environment-friendly option to disposable plastic utensils, and those behind the initiative believe India is an untapped market. "We wanted to create a social enterprise model which was not only looking at improving the environment but also had a business plan that could employ excluded communities such as refugees," said 20-year-old commerce student Nishchay Hans

June 23, 2017
Reuters

Rains fail again in East Africa, hunger on the rise - U.N.

Rains have failed for a third consecutive season in East Africa, wilting crops, killing livestock and entrenching a long drought that has pushed millions into hunger, the United Nations said. Some 16 million people are in need of humanitarian aid across areas of Somalia, Ethiopia, Kenya, Tanzania and Uganda - 30 percent more than in late 2016 and their number expected to increase in the coming months, the U.N. food agency said

July 14, 2017
Trust.org

UN helps Syria's women farmers by treating their livestock

More than a million sheep, goats and cows have been treated for parasites in Syria to help resurrect the country`s war-battered food production and shore up its female farmers, a U.N. agency said. The FAO said it had wrapped up a three-month, anti-parasite campaign, reaching 234,000 farmers in government and rebel-held areas in ten regions, including Homs, Aleppo and Hasakeh. The recipients were mostly women, who are traditionally responsible for livestock in rural Syria and who now make up more than 60 percent of the country`s agricultural workforce

July 14, 2017
Trust.org

Bangladesh cuts red tape to bring home girls sex trafficked to India

Mosharaf Hossain, head of the consular section of the Bangladesh High Commission, has sent about 438 Bangladeshi girls trafficked to India for the sex industry home, nearly half of them in the last six months and most from Maharashtra, India`s second most populous state and a major destination for trafficked girls. "The process has only got smoother now as High Commission officials are taking interest," said Jyoti Nale, programme director for Save the Children India, which works with the Maharashtra government to repatriate girls

July 13, 2017
Trust.org

Climate Change May Bring Disasters and Deeper Poverty to Asia

Asia and the Pacific, home to two thirds of the world’s poor, are at the highest risk of suffering deeper poverty and disaster due to unabated climate change, reversing current development gains, according to the Asian Development Bank. The Asian landmass will see a temperature increase of 6 degrees Celsius (10.8 degrees Fahrenheit) by the end of the century under a business-as-usual scenario, ADB said, based on findings included in a report analysing climate risks in Asia and the Pacific. Some countries in the region could experience significantly hotter climates, with temperature increases in Tajikistan, Afghanistan, Pakistan, and northwest China projected to hit 8 degrees Celsius, ADB said

July 14, 2017
Bloomberg

Floods, reef loss and migration: Asia's future on a hotter planet

A new report by the Asian Development Bank (ADB) and the Potsdam Institute for Climate Impact Research (PIK) outlines the dramatic changes Asia-Pacific nations would face if measures to curb climate change and adapt to its effects are too slow and unambitious to keep global warming within agreed limits. Of the top 20 cities with the largest projected increase in annual flood losses between 2005 and 2050, 13 are in Asia

July 14, 2017
Trust.org

Global health price tag could be $371 billion a year by 2030, WHO says

Meeting life-saving global health targets by 2030 could require investments by donors and national governments of up to $58 per person per year, or $371 billion annually, the WHO said. In a best case scenario of increasing investment to meet the goals, some 97 million premature deaths could be prevented between now and 2030, and up to 8.4 years of life expectancy could be added in some countries

July 17, 2017
Reuters

Progress too slow on global goals for sustainable development, UN says

Progress is not moving fast enough to meet an ambitious set of global goals to conquer poverty, inequality and other international woes by a 2030 deadline, slowed largely by growing war and violence, the United Nations said. The cost of implementation has been estimated at $3 trillion a year. "The rate of progress in many areas is far slower than needed to meet the targets by 2030," wrote U.N. Secretary-General Antonio Guterres

July 17, 2017
trust.org

Dominican vote opens door to possible easing of total abortion ban

Congress in the Dominican Republic rejected upholding the nation`s total ban on abortion, approving a step that would allow the procedure for ending life-threatening pregnancies and those resulting from rape or incest. The lawmakers in the lower house voted against a decision in May by the Dominican Senate, which turned down recommendations made by President Danilo Medina to amend the criminal code and ease the nation`s abortion ban

July 13, 2017
Trust.org

New MTV dramas in Egypt and India tackle female genital mutilation, sex work

American cable television channel MTV is launching drama series in Egypt and in India with storylines on female genital mutilation, child marriage and sex work with the aim of generating debate around issues often seen as taboo. Both series by the Viacom-owned youth entertainment broadcaster will feature soundtracks to appeal to young audiences and popular local actors who will be trained on the issues to help stimulate debates via social media. "We will be using gripping plots based on true stories from young people so that we can destigmatise issues, debunk unhelpful stereotypes and catalyse social change," said Georgia Arnold, head of the MTV Staying Alive Foundation

July 13, 2017
Trust.org

Michigan governor signs laws banning female genital mutilation

Michigan Governor Rick Snyder signed legislation making genital mutilation of girls a state felony punishable by up to 15 years in prison, both for doctors who perform the procedure and parents who transport a child to undergo the surgery. The package of 13 bills signed by Snyder, a Republican, was spurred by the case of an emergency room physician, Jumana Nagarwala, who was charged in April under federal law with performing genital mutilation on two 7-year-old girls at a suburban Detroit medical clinic

July 11, 2017
Reuters

How bitter herbs and botched abortions kill three women a day in the Philippines

In a country where most women don’t use contraceptives and terminating pregnancy is illegal, ‘torturous’ practices are often the only option. More than 65% of women don’t use modern contraceptives, and maternal mortality rates are still high in the Philippines, standing at 114 deaths per 100,000 live births in 2015. Although it’s against the law to end a pregnancy in the Philippines, an estimated 610,000 abortions take place every year

July 10, 2017
The Guardian

Contraceptives are "one of the greatest anti-poverty innovations" - Melinda Gates

Contraceptives are "one of the greatest anti-poverty innovations the world has ever known", philanthropist Melinda Gates said, calling for family planning to be made a global priority. Access to birth control boosts economic productivity by freeing up women to work, and leads to smaller families with parents able to devote more resources to their children`s health and education, Gates told an international summit in London on family planning. Financial commitments announced at the conference were expected to total at least $2.5 billion - of which $1.5 billion has been pledged by countries in Africa and Asia

July 11, 2017
Reuters, Trust.org

Does the World’s Top Weed Killer Cause Cancer? Trump’s EPA Will Decide

Weed killer Roundup has revolutionized farming. Now, human health and Bayer’s $66 billion deal for Monsanto depend on an honest appraisal of its safety

July 13, 2017
Bloomberg

Billions around the world lack safe water, proper sanitation facilities, reveals UN report

Some three in ten people around the world lack access to safe and readily available water at home, and almost six in ten to safely managed sanitation, a new United Nations report has warned, calling on countries to do more to fulfil these basic human needs. According to the WHO and UNICEF joint report, Progress on Drinking Water, Sanitation and Hygiene: 2017 Update and Sustainable Development Goal Baselines, many homes, healthcare facilities and schools also lack soap and water for handwashing, putting the health of all people – but especially young children – at risk for deadly diseases

July 12, 2017
United Nations

Life expectancy increases in Britain beginning to stall - report

Life expectancy in Britain has all but stopped rising after more than 100 years of advances, a leading professor of public health said. Until 2010, life expectancy at birth was rising by one year every five years for women, and by one year every three and a half years for men. But since 2010, the average rate of increase has halved, and in 2013-15 it was near zero, a report by the Institute of Health Equity found

July 18, 2017
Reuters

More girls at risk of genital mutilation in Germany

The number of girls living in Germany who have had their genitals mutilated increased sharply in 2016 due to migrants arriving from countries where this is practised, a spokeswoman for a women`s rights organisation said. More than 58,000 women living in Germany have had their genitals mutilated, Terre des Femmes said. Spokeswoman Charlotte Weil said that marked an increase of 10,000 compared with 2015

July 18, 2017
trust.org

Indonesia's disaster agency says forest fire threat to escalate

Indonesia`s disaster mitigation agency (BNPB) has warned of an escalating threat of forest fires with the dry season expected to peak in coming months. Fires had spread to around 64 hectares (158 acres) of fields and forests in Aceh, a northern province on the island of Sumatra, producing haze and some residents had been taken to hospital due to breathing problem, the agency said. "The peak of the dry season is predicted to be in August and September, so the threat of forest and field fires, and drought will escalate," Sutopo Purwo Nugroho, a spokesman for BNPB, said

July 25, 2017
Trust.org

Trump Proposal Would Put Clean Drinking Water out of Reach for Millions Around the World

Scaling back development assistance as President Trump has envisioned would have disastrous, even lethal, consequences for people living on the brink. For example, his proposal would cut water assistance to Nigeria by 80 percent—even while it endures famine that UNICEF says could claim the lives of a half million children. And it would reduce water and sanitation support to Nepal by 99 percent—even while the Nepalese, still in the early stages of recovery from a horrific earthquake, face threats of disease outbreaks as they rebuild critical water and sanitation infrastructure

July 24, 2017
UN Dispatch

Indonesia environment minister wants permanent ban on licences to use forest land

Indonesia`s environment minister wants to make permanent a moratorium on issuing new licences to use land designated as primary forest and peatland. The moratorium, part of an effort to reduce emissions from fires caused by deforestation, was extended by President Joko Widodo for a third time in May. "So far its only been extended, and extended again. I want a permanent (moratorium)," said Environment and Forestry Minister Siti Nurbaya Bakar

July 24, 2017
Trust.org

Nigeria has largest number of children out-of-school in the world

Nigeria has the largest number of children in the world who are not being educated, the government has said. Acknowledging the scale of the problem the education ministry`s permanent secretary Adamu Hussaini said it was "sad to note" that Nigeria had 10.5 million children out of school. This is the first time senior officials have admitted the size of the problem. Cultural factors have been blamed but critics point to a lack of money going to publicly funded schools

July 25, 2017
BBC

India plans overhaul of colonial-era land titles

India is considering updating its colonial-era land records with a system that cuts fraud and protects the poor as mounting wrangles over land crimp economic growth, an official said. But the overhaul could take decades to come good, he added, despite a growing thirst for land deals in fast-growing India. "Every transaction is imperfect, and the onus of establishing ownership is on the buyer," said S. Chockalingam, director of land records in western Maharashtra state

July 26, 2017
Trust.org

German Court Backs Bid to Ban Diesel Cars in Stuttgart

A German court backed an effort to ban diesel cars from Stuttgart, dealing a blow to carmakers such as Daimler and Volkswagen which had sought to avert legal curbs by modifying vehicles to cut their emissions. Since Volkswagen admitted in September 2015 to cheating emissions tests, diesel cars have been scrutinized for nitrogen oxide emissions blamed for causing respiratory disease. Environmental group DUH went to court two months after the VW scandal broke seeking to force the city of Stuttgart to drastically improve its air quality by banning diesel cars. The city has since said it would bar diesel cars which did not conform to the latest emissions standards, on days when pollution is heavy

July 28, 2017
Reuters

Crowdfunding restores ponds in drought-hit south India

The worst drought in more than a century in southern India has led to protests, farmer suicides, and clashes at the water taps as reservoirs and lakes dry up in the searing heat. It has also led to an unusual crowdfunding campaign that helped restore a village pond in one of the worst affected areas, with a similar effort planned for a second pond. The effort, led by The Better India website, raised more than 1.1 million rupees ($17,000) on crowdfunding site Milaap

July 27, 2017
Trust.org

German politicians, industry agree diesel plan: sources

Car industry officials and politicians in Germany have agreed to update the engine software of around 9 million diesel cars as part of a plan to avoid bans on diesel vehicles in major cities, industry and government sources said. The software updates will cost under 2 billion euros ($2.33 billion) for cars in Germany, with the auto industry agreeing to shoulder the expense of about 100 euros per car

July 21, 2017
Reuters

Women murder victims: guns used in majority of homicides

Guns are used in more than half of murders of women, and the highest frequency is among non-Hispanic black victims, according to a new analysis by the CDC. Domestic violence is a big factor: Firearms were used in nearly 54 percent of female homicides, and in 55 percent of those cases the perpetrator is someone with whom the victim has been intimately involved. Past studies have demonstrated that a woman’s risk of homicide increases greatly if her male abuser owns a gun

July 21, 2017
Newsweek, NPR
July 20, 2017
Washington Post

Insurance for poor could protect the most disaster-vulnerable - governments

Insurance is an underused way to help save lives in natural disasters and soften their impact on the poorest countries - and it needs to be better understood by governments and aid groups, said insurers, aid experts and government ministers. There is "clear evidence" that when insurance pay outs are available during a natural disaster "economic recovery is quicker, human deprivation is lower (and) there is lower cost to the taxpayer," said Stephen Catlin, chair of the Insurance Development Forum

July 20, 2017
trust.org

Paying Uganda farmers not to cut down trees halved deforestation - study

Paying Ugandan farmers not to chop down trees cut deforestation in half and was almost 50 times more cost effective in fighting climate change than many energy efficiency programmes in the U.S., according to a study by researchers from the U.S.`s Northwestern University and Dutch organisation Porticus. It involved 121 villages with half paid about $28 a year for every hectare of forest left untouched while the others continued as normal. Using satellite images to track deforestation over two years, the researchers found 5.5 more hectares of forest was preserved in the villages in the payment programme compared to the other villages

July 20, 2017
trust.org

Abortion rights groups sue Texas to block procedure ban

Abortion rights groups filed a lawsuit seeking to block a Texas law that bans the most common method of second-trimester abortion which critics argue erodes women`s rights. The challenge, which came six weeks after the state`s governor signed the law, was the latest salvo in a battle over state laws enacted by Republican-controlled state legislatures that advocates say limit access to abortion

July 20, 2017
Reuters

China's War on Foreign Garbage

For more than 30 years, imports of recycled goods have fueled China`s manufacturing boom. The government has now announced that it`d had enough. By the end of the year, it told the World Trade Organization, it would stop accepting most recycled plastics, paper, textiles and other products from overseas. The decision is part of a campaign against "foreign garbage" that harms public health and the environment

July 20, 2017
Bloomberg

With climate change driving child marriage risks, Bangladesh fights back

Climate change-driven extreme weather is accelerating migration to Bangladesh`s cities, raising the risks of problems such as child marriage, according to UNICEF`s head of Bangladesh programmes. Innovative efforts to curb the threat - particularly training young people to help each other - are paying off, with Bangladesh`s government now incorporating programmes started by UNICEF and Save the Children

July 20, 2017
trust.org

Drinking during pregnancy may affect several generations, UC Riverside study finds

New research from UC Riverside has found that drinking alcohol while pregnant can cause brain changes in offspring that may be passed all the way down to great-grandchildren. Neuroscientist and psychology professor Kelly Huffman’s most recent work built on her 2013 study in mice that showed exposing a foetus to alcohol changes the brain’s wiring. It further bolsters the conclusion that no amount of alcohol is safe during pregnancy, Huffman said

July 7, 2017
The Press Enterprise

International NGOs' China operations hit by registration delays under new law

Some international NGOs in China are suspending operations, cancelling events and losing partnerships in the country six months after the government introduced a law requiring them to register with the police. To register, the groups must first approach a government ministry from a provided list and ask it to become a "supervisory body" that will vet financial and operational details of the NGO`s work before filing them with the Ministry of Public Security. Most of the dozen NGOs approached by Reuters say the law has been a bureaucratic nightmare and appears to be aimed at making it more difficult for them to operate in China

July 7, 2017
Trust.org

Homophobic bullying drops at UK schools but suicides bids 'alarming' - study

Stonewall`s 2017 School Report questioned over 3,700 LGBT students and found one in five lesbian, gay and bisexual students have attempted suicide and two in five transgender pupils have tried to take their own lives. Ruth Hunt, chief executive of Stonewall, said the group`s third School Report showed progress had been made, with 45 percent of LGBT pupils reporting bullying compared to 65 percent in 2007 and 55 percent in 2012. But she said suicide and self-harming remained too frequent - and one in 10 transgender students had received death threats

June 27, 2017
Trust.org

White House Pushes Military Might Over Humanitarian Aid in Africa

Pentagon officials are concerned that shifting to a military-heavy presence in Africa will hurt American interests in the long term by failing to stimulate development. An absence of schools and jobs, they say, creates more openings for militant groups. If Congress passes Mr. Trump’s proposed Pentagon budget for the 2018 fiscal year — it calls for an additional $52 billion on top of the current $575 billion base budget — the United States will spend more money on military affairs in Africa but reduce humanitarian and development assistance across the continent

June 26, 2017
New York Times

At food trading 'chokepoints', climate change could disrupt supplies - report

International trade in food relies on a small number of key ports, straits and roads, which face increasing risks of disruption due to climate change, a new report says. Disruptions caused by weather, conflict or politics at one of those so-called "chokepoints" could limit food supplies and push up prices, the study by British think-tank Chatham House warned. "The risks are growing as we all trade more with each other and as climate change takes hold," Laura Wellesley, one of the study`s authors, said

June 26, 2017
Trust.org

China launches five "green finance" pilot zones

China has launched five pilot zones to promote "green finance" and help pay for a war on pollution that is expected to cost at least 3 trillion yuan ($440 billion) a year, according to notices published by the central bank. The five zones will be set up in the provinces of Guangdong, Guizhou, Jiangxi and Zhejiang, as well as the far western region of Xinjiang, and financial institutions will be given a variety of incentives to provide credit and special funds for environmentally friendly industries

June 27, 2017
Trust.org

U.S. brands China as among worst human trafficking offenders

The U.S. State Department has placed China on its global list of the worst offenders in human trafficking and forced labour, a step that could aggravate tensions with Beijing that had eased under President Donald Trump. Myanmar was upgraded to the Tier 2 Watch List of nations that deserve special scrutiny, from Tier 3, those countries not complying with minimum U.S. standards and making no significant effort to do so. Afghanistan, Malaysia and Qatar moved up to Tier 2, a list of nations making significant efforts to comply

June 27, 2017
Trust.org

Construction on wetlands ramps up water stress in Zimbabwe

"A wetland acts like a sponge which absorbs water and then recharges underground water so that the water table remains high. Construction disrupts this process," said Sandra Gobvu of Environment Africa, an NGO that works in southern Africa to promote sustainable development. When wetland areas are concreted over, much less water is absorbed, Gobvu added. Wetlands also help control flooding by absorbing excess water and releasing it gradually into water bodies, she said. "If we preserved them in their natural state, wetlands would actually help us adapt to the changing climatic conditions," said Barnabas Mawire, Environment Africa`s Zimbabwe country director

June 27, 2017
Trust.org

Politics of Death: Land conflict and murder go 'hand in hand' in Brazil

The scale of violence, role of farming in the economy, hazy nature of property ownership and impunity make land conflicts particularly dangerous in Brazil. Brazil`s National Indian Foundation (FUNAI), the government agency responsible for protecting the land rights of indigenous people, has missed its own deadline to demarcate the land, or in essence to ring fence it for indigenous people. "The government only thinks about agribusiness, not us Guarani-Kaiowa," indigenous activist Elson Gomes said. "We don`t have enough land or a place of our own to survive"

June 27, 2017
Trust.org

Facebook's WhatsApp is so huge in India that one app reached 9 million users without spending a ...

According to Mary Meeker`s annual internet trends report published last month, WhatsApp is the most popular Android app in India, followed by Facebook Messenger at number two and the core Facebook service at number five. With over 200 million users in India, WhatsApp is how digital health start-up 1mg went viral, even without founder Prashant Tandon having to spend any money promoting it. Since its launch in 2015, more than 9 million people have downloaded his app, which helps users research prescription drugs and find the lowest prices.

June 25, 2017
CNBC

Tens of thousands have fled violence in Congo Republic

More than 80,000 people have fled their homes in Pool province surrounding Congo Republic`s capital since the government began a military operation there last year, a joint U.N. and government statement said. The United Nations is seeking around $20 million in emergency funding to provide humanitarian assistance in the province, after a recent visit found widespread signs malnutrition, the statement said. Many of the displaced remain beyond the reach of aid workers, it added

June 24, 2017
Trust.org

Malaria prevention drug improves birth outcomes in Zambia

A study recently carried out in Zambia found that a drug recommended for the prevention of malaria in pregnant women also reduces the risk of contracting sexually transmitted infections and reproductive tract infections. The study also found that the drug, sulfadoxine-pyrimethamine can lead to improved birth outcomes. Women who received two or more doses of the drug saw their risk of experiencing stillbirth, low birth weight, preterm delivery or intrauterine growth retardation cut by 45 percent

June 23, 2017
Lusaka Times

Tanzanian leader reaffirms ban on pregnant girls attending state schools

Tanzanian President John Magufuli has rejected activists` calls for the government to allow pregnant students to attend state schools, saying it was immoral for young girls to be sexually active. Tanzania`s ban on pregnant girls attending state primary and secondary schools dates back to 1961, when the country secured its independence from Britain, though it does not extend to private schools. Activists have stepped up calls in recent years for the ban to be scrapped, saying expelled teenagers face widespread stigma, the possibility of being forced into early marriage and the challenge of providing for themselves and their babies

June 23, 2017
Trust.org

Kenya gives girls free sanitary pads to boost school attendance

Kenya has promised free sanitary pads to all schoolgirls to encourage them to go to school during their periods, rather than stay at home with rags or tissues stuffed in their underwear. Every schoolgirl in Kenya is entitled to "free, sufficient and quality sanitary towels" and a safe place to dispose of them, according to the law introduced this week. "We are treating the access to sanitary pads as a basic human right," government spokesman Eric Kiraithe said. "We are improving the sanitation and healthcare of our schoolgirls, which will boost their class attendance

June 23, 2017
Trust.org

Chained to health ministry, Peruvians protest mining pollution

Parents of sick children who live near one of Peru`s oldest mining pits camped out in front of the health ministry in Lima for an eighth day on Thursday, demanding help to deal with the impact of decades of mining pollution. Dozens of residents of Simon Bolivar, a district in the city of Cerro de Pasco in the Peruvian Andes, travelled to Lima to press the government to declare a health emergency and build a regional hospital specializing in exposure to heavy metals. More than 40 percent of the area`s children who were tested in a 2012 study had dangerously high levels of lead in their blood, according to a screening of some 2,700 children by regional health authorities

June 23, 2017
Reuters

The enemy within: as FARC rebels disarm, what peace for Colombia's women?

One woman is killed every four days in Colombia. Many are victims of femicide - a killing of a woman by a man because of her gender - often at the hands of a former or current partner. Tackling violence against women is a key challenge for Colombia as the nation puts behind it 52 years of war that has killed 200,000 people and displaced 7 million. The FARC peace deal is an opportunity for the government to focus more attention and resources on combating gender violence, and for the domestic violence problem to become more visible

June 23, 2017
Trust.org

A health issue, not a crime: it's time to scrap outdated abortion laws

Last Wednesday the Queensland law reform commission (QLRC) received a reference to consider how Queensland should amend laws relating to termination of pregnancy and remove abortion offences from the criminal code. The QLRC has 12 months to report on how to repeal these archaic Queensland laws dating back to 1861. The abortion provisions from that 1861 act are alive and kicking in the Queensland criminal code and the NSW crimes act, in both of which it’s still an offence for a woman to obtain an abortion or for anyone, including a doctor, to assist her. Penalties range up to 14 years in jail in Queensland and 10 years in NSW

June 24, 2017
The Guardian

Feeling sick at home? The wallpaper in your room might be the reason

Toxins produced by fungus growing on the wallpapers in our home can contaminate the air and be easily inhaled, leading to "sick building syndrome," a new study has found. Mycotoxins can be inhaled and should be investigated as parameters of indoor air quality, especially in homes with visible fungal contamination. The impetus for the study was the dearth of data on the health risk from mycotoxins produced by fungi growing indoors

June 24, 2017
Economic Times

Child marriages will cost poor countries trillions of dollars

Child marriage will cost developing countries trillions of dollars in the next decade, seriously hampering global efforts to eradicate poverty, the World Bank said. An estimated one in three girls in the developing world is married before the age of 18, with one girl married off every two seconds, according to experts. The World Bank said ending child marriage would reduce population growth, boost girls` educational achievements and increase their earnings. It would also lead to women having healthier and better educated children, further boosting prosperity

June 27, 2017
Trust.org

French ethics panel backs lesbian procreation help

Campaigners for lesbian motherhood got a significant boost in France on Tuesday when a panel of ethics specialists said that female couples and single women should be granted access to sperm-donor techniques of medically assisted reproduction. The recommendation from the National Consultative Committee on Ethics (CCNE) comes two months after President Emmanuel Macron promised to legislate on access to medically assisted procreation for lesbians if elected

June 27, 2017
Reuters

With colour-coded warnings, Indian city gets serious about dirty air

Ahmedabad, in the western state of Gujarat, has among the worst air pollution in India. But it is the first to install an air monitoring and warning system. The Air Information and Response (AIR) plan, launched in May, involves the creation of an air quality index that measures daily pollution levels in eight locations. Giant LED screens display five colour-coded alerts of the levels, and their related effects. An early warning system also alerts people to days when pollution is likely to reach the "very poor" or "severe" level

July 5, 2017
Trust.org

Hunger rife among Rohingya children after Myanmar crackdown -WFP

More than 80,000 young children may need treatment for malnutrition in part of western Myanmar where the army cracked down on stateless Rohingya Muslims last year, the World Food Programme said. In the first detailed on-the-ground assessment of the community affected by the violence since October, the WFP interviewed 450 families in 45 villages in Maungdaw district in March and April. "The survey confirmed a worsening of the food security situation in already highly vulnerable areas (since October)," the agency said. About a third of those surveyed reported "extreme ...food insecurity" such as going a day and night without eating

July 5, 2017
Trust.org

In the U.S., infant mortality gap costs the lives of about 4,000 black babies each year

If black infants born in the United States had all of the health and medical benefits enjoyed by white infants, nearly 4,000 fewer of them would die each year, new research suggests. That would amount to a nearly 60% decrease in the number of black infants that die each year. Instead, black babies are nearly 2.5 times more likely than white babies to die during their first year of life

July 3, 2017
Los Angeles Times

France to make vaccination mandatory from 2018 as it is 'unacceptable children are still dying o...

Parents in France will be legally obliged to vaccinate their children from 2018, the government has announced. French Prime Minister Édouard Philippe said it was “unacceptable” that children are "still dying of measles” in the country where some of the earliest vaccines were pioneered. Three childhood vaccines, for diphtheria, tetanus and polio, are currently mandatory in France. Others, including those against hepatitis and whooping cough, are simply recommended

July 5, 2017
The Independent
July 7, 2017
shape.com
July 5, 2017
Newsweek

UNICEF: 10 million Yemeni children need urgent help

Most children in Yemen lack medical care, adequate nutrition, fresh water, sanitation and education, UN body says. Jamie McGoldrick, the UN humanitarian coordinator in Yemen, said at a news conference that aid groups in Yemen have pulled resources from the fight against malnutrition to battle the cholera outbreak in the country, raising risk of famine as they struggle to find funds. "We`re trying to do our best, but it`s very much beyond what we can cope with," he said

July 6, 2017
aljazeera.com

Property rights campaign for women takes aim at patriarchy in South Asia

Across India, only 13 percent of farmland is owned by women. Activists have launched a campaign in South Asia to appeal to men to stand up for the property rights of their daughters, wives and sisters and ask women to demand their share as a way to curb violence against women in the region. Property for Her was launched on social media this week, with messages on Twitter and Facebook, as well as a petition on change.org. The petition asks parents to promise to leave their daughter an equal share of property, and brothers to stand with their sisters in ensuring her rights

July 6, 2017
Trust.org

Haryana looks at zero diarrhoea childhood deaths

According to National Family Health Survey-IV, at least 10 per cent of children below the age of five years in Haryana die of diarrhoea. The health officials noticed that the problem was more prevalent among underserved population, without access to clean drinking water and those who lived in unhygienic condition were found to be more vulnerable. For children under the age of five years, around 7.7 per cent of the children across state suffered from diarrhoea

July 3, 2017
Times of India

World hunger on the rise again due to conflict and climate - U.N.

The number of hungry people in the world is rising again after years of decline, as millions suffer from the combined effects of conflict and climate change, the head of the U.N. food agency said. "Preliminary data available for this year indicates that the number of undernourished people in the world has (started to) rise again," said Jose Graziano da Silva, director-general of the U.N. Food and Agriculture Organization. Graziano da Silva said this year`s setback in the fight against hunger hardly came as a surprise, with almost 20 million people facing starvation because of fighting and drought in South Sudan, Nigeria, Somalia and Yemen

July 3, 2017
Trust.org

Tap water dwindles as cities parched by South India drought

One of southern India`s worst droughts in decades has dried up reservoirs in the region, severely impacting the availability of drinking water in Chennai and other cities. Water supplies across the port city of Chennai have dropped by half, with the government saying tap water may dwindle to a trickle in the days to come. "We are supplying between 450 to 470 million litres of water every day," compared to the normal requirement of 830 million litres, said Arun Roy, of the Chennai Metropolitan Water Supply and Sewage Board that supplies water across the city

June 28, 2017
Trust.org

California to list herbicide as cancer-causing; Monsanto vows fight

Glyphosate, an herbicide and the active ingredient in Monsanto`s Roundup weed killer, will be added to California`s list of chemicals known to cause cancer effective July 7, the state`s Office of Environmental Health Hazard Assessment said. Monsanto vowed to continue its legal fight against the designation and called the decision "unwarranted on the basis of science and the law." The listing is the latest legal setback for the company, which has faced increasing litigation over glyphosate since the World Health Organization`s International Agency for Research on Cancer said that it is "probably carcinogenic" in a controversial ruling in 2015

June 27, 2017
Reuters

Major diseases, conditions that kill children before their fifth birthday

Sub-Saharan Africa remains the region with the highest mortality rate of children under five years, with one child in 12 dying before their fifth birthday — far higher than the average ratio of one in 147 in high-income countries. In Part Two of the maternal health series, The Star Kenya seeks to find out the causes of infant mortality and what needs to be done — and has already been done — to reduce these numbers

June 28, 2017
Star Kenya

How investing in poor children saves lives and boosts the economy

UNICEF is launching a compelling report, Narrowing the Gaps: The power of investing in the poorest children, showing that investments in the most deprived children and communities provide greater value for money. The study indicates that every $1 million invested in the poorest children saves nearly twice as many lives as the same investments that do not reach the poor. These findings have important implications, also in Kenya, especially as the Government works to achieve the Sustainable Development Goals and Kenya’s Vision 2030. The SDG child mortality target aims to end all preventable new born and child deaths by 2030. This universal goal demands urgent action to reach the still unreached children, families and communities

June 28, 2017
Standard Media

France to legislate on assisted reproduction: spokesman

The French government wants to give lesbian couples and single women access to assisted reproduction, a government spokesman said, setting the scene for a major extension of gay rights under new President Emmanuel Macron. Spokesman Christophe Castaner said the government would not rush the issue and would aim to build a consensus. France saw often-violent protests leading up to the legalization in 2013 of marriage and adoption for same-sex couples. Castaner said Macron had promised to pursue the issue once an influential ethics panel made its view known, and that the goal now would be to legislate on the matter

June 28, 2017
Reuters

Rubbish piles raise health fears in strike-hit Greece

Sacks of rubbish and rotting vegetables piled high on the pavements of Athens` port of Piraeus on Monday - signs of a mounting labour dispute fast turning into a public health crisis. The strikers fear job losses as Greece wrestles with its seventh year of austerity demanded by international creditors. More specifically, the workers want better terms for short-term staff threatened, they say, by a court order banning extensions to their contracts

June 28, 2017
Reuters

100,000 children in extreme danger in Mosul, trapped behind IS lines - UN

About 100,000 children are trapped in extremely dangerous conditions in the remaining Islamic State-held enclave in the northern Iraqi city of Mosul, the United Nations said, children were being used as human shields by the insurgents or were caught in the crossfire of the battle, the United Nations Children Fund (UNICEF) said. Some had been forced to take part in the fighting. Hospitals and clinics had come under attack, it said. "We are receiving alarming reports of civilians including several children being killed in west Mosul," UNICEF said. "Some were reportedly killed as they desperately tried to flee the fighting which is intensifying by the hour"

June 6, 2017
Trust.org

Asia can unlock $5 trillion, 230 million jobs via key development goals

In a region vulnerable to weather-related disasters, pushing ahead on good development could turn threats to opportunities, experts say, it is believed that businesses in Asia could unlock at least $5 trillion in market opportunities and create 230 million jobs by 2030 by implementing a few key development goals, global business and finance leaders said. The report identified four key areas with the most significant opportunities - cities, energy and materials, food and agriculture, and health and well-being - and specific projects such as affordable housing, renewable energy, reducing food waste and sustainable aquaculture

June 6, 2017
Trust.org

Dangote, Adenuga, Otedola, others can end poverty in Nigeria – Oxfam

As part of its ‘Even it Up’ campaign, a new Oxfam report highlighted the large and growing gap between the rich and the poor in Nigeria. It said economic inequality is a key factor behind the conflict that has led to the severe food crisis in its north eastern states, which the UN estimates will see 5m people suffer from food shortages this year. Despite a growing economy, Nigeria saw the number living in poverty increase from 69m to 112m between 2004 and 2010 and the number of millionaires grew by 44% during that same period

May 17, 2017
Vanguard, Guardian Nigeria, Nan.ng, Cable Nigeria, Channel STV, Naij

Nigeria: New Research Shows Rising Support for Nigeria's Gay Marriage Ban

More than half of Nigerians surveyed do not think that lesbian, gay, bisexual, transgender and intersex people should have access to basic health services, according to new research released by Nigerian human rights organization, the Initiative for Equal Rights. Of the 2,000 people surveyed, 90% of them said they supported the introduction of a 2014 Act banning gay marriage, a slight increase over the previous year’s survey

May 17, 2017
allafrica.com, Bhekisisa

Trees in eastern US head west as climate changes

A study suggest that, in the near-term, trees are responding to changes in water availability more than to temperature changes. A study tracking the shifting distributions of 86 types of trees using data collected by the U.S. Forestry Inventory and Analysis Program found more trees heading west than (as they had expected) north. Angiosperms, or flowering trees went west and gymnosperms, mostly conifers headed north

May 17, 2017
Nature

Forced from their forests, Cameroon's female pygmies bear brunt of alcohol abuse

Driven from their ancestral lands by logging and mining firms, many of the 50,000 Baka pygmies in eastern Cameroon are turning to alcohol to cope. Struggling to adapt to life outside the forests, the Baka’s problems of poverty, hunger and alcoholism are likely to worsen. Some pygmie girls are abducted by traffickers to work in major cities as maids or sex slaves. Many return with Aids and STIs, some Baka die or go blind from drinking home-grown alcohol

May 17, 2017
Trust.org

No man is born 'trashy'

An article in News24 tackles the scale of domestic violence in South Africa where it was found 60,000 women and children are victims of domestic violence, according to a study carried out by the World Health Organization. South Africa is the second most unsafe country out of the 48 countries south of the Sahara. Many domestic violence victims do not understand what it is and two in three women suffer a form of abuse, but the problem is being ignored

May 17, 2017
News24

Jordan's Azraq becomes world first clean energy refugee camp

Thousands of Syrian refugees will be able to light their homes, charge their phones and chill their food by solar power as Jordan’s Azraq camp became the world’s first refugee camp to be powered by renewable energy, the UN refugee agency said

May 17, 2017
Trust.org, Reuters, Times of Israel, UNHCR, Daily Sabah

Donald Trump vs. Women’s Health

In the US delayed detection is one of the reasons that a disease like cervical cancer has one of the lowest survival rates in the developed world. This is due in some part to lack of healthcare insurance cover, where women seek help far too late. In addition, Trump is undermining the fight against cervical cancer by seeking to defund Planned Parenthood, which performs some 270,000 cervical screenings annually. Then there is the expanded global gag rule which slashes abortion advice and the cut-off of funds for the UN Population Fund, another major player in reducing cervical cancer deaths

May 20, 2017
New York Times

Virtual pictures of overweight children as adults trialled to shock parents into action

Health experts in a part of the UK have adapted 3D modelling techniques to encourage families of overweight youngsters to make major lifestyle changes. Parents have been shown virtual images of their children as overweight adults to shock them into action in a new strategy aimed at reducing health risks associated with obesity. Parents saw digitally manipulated pictures of their children in adulthood and in many cases were shocked into making major lifestyle changes in a trial run by experts at the University of Newcastle involving 2,200 families

May 20, 2017
The Independent, telegraph

South African men march against abuse of women and children

Hundreds of South Africans who have been angered by a rise in violence against women and children took to the streets and marched in protest, calling for action, in the South African capital Pretoria

May 20, 2017
BBC, AlJazeera
May 21, 2017
News24

Around 2,305sq kilometere of India's forest cover could be wiped out by 2025 ISRO study

A staggering 2,305km of forest cover in northeast India and the Andaman & Nicobar Islands – slightly more than the size of Mauritius, could disappear by 2025, a simulation study by ISRO scientists has predicted. Published in the Journal of Earth System Science in February, the study investigated the distribution of forest cover in India and predicted the ever continuing deforestation in selected parts of India with high deforestation rates

May 20, 2017
The News Minute

Threat of malnutrition still high in Somalia despite onset of rains: ICRC

Rains in Somalia have brought some relief from drought but malnutrition remains a threat, the Red Cross said, with the number of children admitted to its feeding centres nationwide nearly doubling over the last year. In addition to food shortages, Somalia is experiencing a rapid spread of cholera, with more than 20,000 cases reported nationwide. The outbreak is expected to worsen due to the rains

May 19, 2017
Reuters

Spain sex trafficking case lodged to U.N. shows lack of protection for victims - charity

After being trafficked to Spain and forced into prostitution, Gladys John was detained by police in 2010 and deported just days later, said Women’s Link Worldwide, which represented John at the time. The legal charity submitted John’s case to the UN’s Committee Against Torture on Friday, saying she was tortured as a sex trafficking victim and then again by the Spanish police. She was held in a detention centre, though she was a victim not a criminal, and was 11 weeks pregnant but received no prenatal care in detention. It was inhuman and degrading treatment

May 19, 2017
Trust.org

Arctic stronghold of world’s seeds flooded after permafrost melts

Containing a million packets of seeds, each a variety of important food crops, the Global Seed Vault on the Norwegian island of Spitsbergen was expected to be a failsafe, a protection against the challenges of natural or man-made disasters. It was recently flooded after extraordinary winter temperatures melted the permafrost and sent meltwater gushing into the tunnel entrance

May 19, 2017
The Guardian, Arstechnica, VICE

Rescued migrants tell of detention, beatings, slavery in Libya

Libya is sliding deeper into lawlessness. Smugglers are packing record numbers onto unsafe boats with sea arrivals in Italy up by 35%. MSF, one of the few aid agencies entering Libyan government controlled migrant camps said it had witnessed adult malnutrition, overcrowding, violence-related injuries and a lack of basic hygiene. Reports from migrants reaching Italy as refugees say the Libyan militia groups ‘believe blacks are slaves and they beat them, lock them up and mistreat them’. Despite the EU agreeing to funnel millions of Euros to the UN backed government in Tripoli to open migrant centres to be managed by UN agencies, these centres have yet to be opened as it is too dangerous

May 19, 2017
Trust.org

Facebook and Twitter 'harm young people's mental health'

Four of the five most popular forms of social media harm young people’s mental health, with Instagram the most damaging, according to research by two health organizations. The four platforms have a negative effect because they can exacerbate children’s and young people’s body image worries, and worsen bullying, sleep problems and feelings of anxiety, depression and loneliness, the participants said

May 19, 2017
The Guardian, BBC

Asians say they back breastfeeding...yet harassment persists

Women in Asia face widespread harassment for breastfeeding in public, according to campaigners, despite a new poll showing that most people in Asia say it should be protected by law. The survey found 77% of respondents were in favour, 75% said it should be protected by law. However, campaigners say the reality falls short of the numbers released by YouGov due to conservative values or a lack of awareness about the benefits of breastfeeding 

May 17, 2017
Reuters

Smart bangle delivers pregnancy tips to Asian wrists

A hi-tech bangle that alerts pregnant women to toxic fumes and issues audio tips promises to boost maternal health in South Asia, as smart devices deliver more services to remote communities. The bangle was developed by Intel Social Business and it is designed to withstand the rigours of village life. Made of durable plastic, water-resistant and with a long-lasting battery that does not require charging during the duration of the pregnancy, neither does it need an internet connection to work. It can deliver wellness messages twice a week, what to eat and when to see a doctor

May 17, 2017
Reuters

One in four children in Arab world live in poverty - UNICEF study

One in four children in the Arab world live in poverty, often deprived of life’s most basic necessities such as proper housing or safe water, according to a study by UNICEF. The study is the first to pull together data on child poverty across the region and it found that a lack of education is a key driver of poverty among the young

May 15, 2017
Trust.org

How a Tsunami in Japan Endangered Children in Cambodia

Cambodia has long struggled with iodine deficiency in its soil and crops. In 1999, with help from donors Cambodia began iodizing table salt. From 2000-2011 iodized salt use rose to 70% from 13% of households, according to a 2015 study. In 2010 UNICEF and donors turned responsibility for iodination over to the government and salt producers. Enforcement grew lax and spraying machines went unrepaired. Then after the 2011 tsunami in Japan, the global price of iodine tripled as the catastrophe damaged wells and slashed supply. UNICEF is now urging the government to enforce its own laws. In 1997 almost a fifth of all Cambodians had goiters, which can cause other preventable diseases

May 15, 2017
New York Times

Struggling after Ebola, Liberian girls miss school to work, sell sex

After Ebola, more girls in Liberia are missing out on school to help their families, while those in education are pressurised to have sex or pay bribes for grades or simply to be allowed to sit exams, a charity said. Street Child said the need to boost family income is making many drop out of school or preventing them from getting an education

May 15, 2017
Trust.org

Ongoing forest destruction has put Asia-Pacific at risk of missing global development targets

The destruction of forests in many Asian countries continues apace, threatening the realization of global sustainable development goals by the 2030 deadline, according to the UN agricultural agency. Forests continue to be degraded and lost at a rate of 3.3m hectares per year, they provide clean air for breathing and safe water to drink and are home to more than 80% of land animals and plants and a natural defence against climate change 

May 15, 2017
United Nations

Shocking stats show one in five SA women experience domestic violence

A new Stats SA study indicates that one in five women report experiencing violence at the hands of a partner. Some 21% of women over 18 reported domestic violence. Eight percent of women reported experiencing violence in the previous 12 month period. A further six percent reported experiencing sexual violence by a partner, with the poorest women being most at risk 

May 15, 2017
Times Live, Business Day , Daily Maverick

Earlier menopause puts women at greater risk of heart failure, study shows

A US-based study revealed that women who have never given birth have more than a two-fold increase in the risk of a common type of the condition known as diastolic heart failure, compared with women who have children. The authors say the new study flags up the importance of looking at how factors such as pregnancy and reproductive periods are related to cardiovascular health

May 15, 2017
Guardian, EurekAlert
May 16, 2017
Pharmaceutical Journal
May 15, 2017
Hindustan Times

Chelsea Clinton on drawbacks of global health funding, WHO slippage and priorities for next

Too tight a concentration of donors with their own individual priorities sometimes means they don’t match the world’s needs. WHO should have an access to information policy and an inspector-general office which reports to WHO board. It should also get outbreak preparedness and response right and support countries’ efforts to reach universal health coverage

May 12, 2017
Financial Times

For women, baby aspirin may reduce risk of breast cancer

Researchers studied data on 57,164 women, mostly in their early 60s, who had no history of cancer. About 23% of them took a low dose aspirin. About 11% of them took a full strength aspirin and 10% took a COX-2 inhibitor or another nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drug each week. Over seven years 1,457 women got breast cancer and those taking low-dose aspirin were 16% less likely to develop any type of breast cancer 

May 13, 2017
Washington Post

Responding to drought must be sustainable, not piecemeal

UNDP representative in Kenya, Siddarth Chatterjee, writes an opinion blog for the Thomson Reuters Foundation in which she sounds the alarm over the growing levels of food insecurity and malnutrition which are developing across more than half of Kenya’s 47 counties. Chatterjee points to the three hardest hit regions of Turkana, Marsabit and Madera where a third of all children under five are acutely malnourished and says this is already double the ‘emergency status threshold,’ so she is asking the international community for help

May 14, 2017
Trust.org

China supports AU's plans to set up centres to control and detect disease in Africa

The Chinese government backs the AU’s plans to set up African Centres for Disease Control in the hope that early detection and treatment of diseases will stymie the devastation of such outbreaks.  The first centre headquarters would be in Ethiopian capital Addis Ababa and would take three years to build. A further five regional centres would be built in Kenya, Zambia, Nigeria, Egypt and Gabon. China has a large number of expats living in Africa and a yellow fever outbreak a while back in Angola saw some return home and put a strain on the Chinese health system. So it is in China’s national interest – the spokesperson said 

May 14, 2017
Independent Online

Child sex crimes remain taboo as cases surge in conservative India

Sexual violence against children remains a taboo subject in India, despite reports of children being raped, molested and trafficked for sex surging by almost 70% in the latest data, activists and government officials said on Tuesday. There were 14,913 reported sex crimes committed against children in 2015, against 8,904 the previous year. In India’s socially conservative society it remains ignored within families and communities, where victims are afraid to come forward for fear of being blamed for the abuse

May 16, 2017
Trust.org

Pregnancy problems are leading global killer of ​​females aged 15 to 19

The World Health Organization said that more than 1m girls and boys die annually, mostly from preventable causes. Pregnancy complications are the leading cause of death globally among females aged 15-19, with self-harm in second place, a global study has found. The main causes are mental health issues, poor nutrition, reproductive health problems and violence. Failure to address the health of 10-19 year olds undermines the improvements achieved in maternal and child health worldwide

May 16, 2017
Guardian

Nearly 1.2 million teens die every year from mostly preventable causes

Around the globe, nearly 1.2m adolescents die each year, more than 3,000 per day, from largely preventable causes, according to new research from the World Health Organization. The most common causes of deaths among adolescents are road traffic injuries, lower respiratory infections and suicide, the report concluded. More than two-thirds of the deaths occurred in low and middle income countries in Africa and South-East Asia. Physical violence as a cause of death among young men also ranks high

May 16, 2017
CBSNews
May 18, 2017
Ghana Business News
May 16, 2017
World Health Organization
May 17, 2017
QZ.com

Spain's smoking ban tied to drop in preterm and underweight babies

One year after a nationwide ban on smoking in public took effect in Spain, women had significantly fewer premature or underweight infants, a recent study suggests. Researchers examined data on more than 5m babies born in Spain from 2000 to 2013. The study included infants born before any restrictions on public tobacco use, after a 2006 ban covering many workplaces with exceptions in the hospitality industry, and in 2011, after a law curbing tobacco in nearly all public places. The rate of babies born small for their gestational age declined after the partial smoking ban took effect in 2006, and then once more it dropped after the comprehensive ban in 2011. The study authors said second hand smoke exposure during pregnancy is associated with health complications affecting perinatal and neonatal health

May 17, 2017
Reuters

Producing fertilizer from air could be five times as efficient

Eureka Alert reports that an Eindhoven University of Technology Phd has created a revolutionary reactor that converts nitrogen from the atmosphere into NOx, the raw material for fertilizer. The method, in theory, is up to five times as efficient as existing processes, enabling farms to have a small-scale installation without the need for a big investment. His idea is particularly suited for application in remote areas that have no access to power networks, such as Africa. Evonik Industries was involved in this research project and is now working on developing the technology 

May 15, 2017
EurekAlert

New analysis reveals deadly scale of diesel emissions

Illegal and unregulated diesel emissions are causing tens of thousands of unnecessary deaths worldwide, a new analysis says. The meta-analysis examined data from 30 studies and found excess nitrogen oxide was linked to 107,626 premature deaths around the world in 2015. Researchers warned the number of people dying due to diesel emissions could grow to 180,000 in 2040 if governments don’t act

May 15, 2017
Deutsche Welle, Guardian, Phys.Org

Borealis and Borouge help provides safe water for over 50,000 thanks to PE pipes

Borealis, Borouge, the OPEC Fund for International Development and DFID have funded a Nairobi project that has brought safe and affordable drinking water to more than 50,000 of Kenya`s poorest residents. The Nairobi City Water and Sewerage Company found it hard to invest in services here due to the haphazard nature of the settlements and perception residents would not pay. So residents without piped water bought water from private street vendors at much higher prices. The partners extended the existing network into the settlements using high-quality pipes, allowing pre-paid water dispensers to be installed which now provide water for as low as a 10th of the price it would be from a street vendor

May 15, 2017
British Plastics & Rubber

Remote Pacific island found buried under tonnes of plastic waste

Henderson Island is an uninhabited, 5-km wide speck of land halfway between Australia and South America. A recent expedition by researchers from the University of Tasmania found 38m items of rubbish weighing a total of 18 tonnes spread across its beaches. The South Pacific Gyre is a circular water current and it appears Henderson Island is one place where debris is spat out, these items are decades old in many cases

May 15, 2017
New Scientist, NPR.org, Forbes, Live Science

Malabon winning the battle against malnutrition

The city of Malabon in the Philippines started educating mothers about the risks of stunting in children some three years ago, backed by local businesses who helped in the pooling of resources in local intervention programmes. In just three years stunting rates for children shrank by half from 16.3% in 2013 to 8.52% in 2016

May 21, 2017
Rappler

Two Bengaluru women to get uterine transplants, move sparks row

Although this is a clinical trial overseen by the ICMR regulator, activists are posing the question as to whether women should undergo invasive procedures to have a biological baby. Activists are claiming it is not therapy or alleviating pain or illness or saving a life, it is making opportunistic use of the pressure on women to give birth

May 21, 2017
New Indian Express

Millions of Yemenis suffer from lack of food during Ramadan

Nearly 17 million people are facing hunger in war-torn Yemen as Muslims around the world observe the holy month of Ramadan. At the same time, more than two million children suffer from malnutrition in the country, and a child under the age of five dies every 10 minutes of preventable diseases, a UNICEF report said. Additionally, the country is facing a cholera outbreak with more than 29,000 people infected, according to the World Health Organization

May 29, 2017
Daily Sabah, AlJazeera

Stinking mess: Public toilet pollutes Bhavani river

Bhavani River, which was recently found to be contaminated with high amounts of faecal matter, has a new source of pollution - a municipality-run public toilet located near the bridge on Ooty Main Road at Odanthurai - a report from the Tamil Nadu Water Supply and Drainage Board in February found the river water highly contaminated with faecal matter. M Jaikumar, joint secretary of Save Bhavani Trust said the toilet was constructed two years ago, "It was not in use for several months but we found it open again recently so we are trying really hard to educate people and ensure that river contamination is reduced. However, if the government itself indulges in such activities, it becomes really difficult to protect the river," he said

May 29, 2017
Times of India, Nyoooz.com

First woman to lead Indonesia's indigenous peoples alliance

Thomson Reuters Foundation news spoke to Rukka Sombolinggi, 44, of the Torajan tribe from the highlands of Sulawesi island, who this week became the first woman at the helm of the Indigenous Peoples Alliance of the Archipelago (AMAN). She discussed how indigenous women in Indonesia are taking the lead in the fight to protect their land and communities as a rise in conflicts threatens tribes living on lands coveted by extractive and logging companies

May 29, 2017
Trust.org

Big tobacco leaves huge ecological footprint - WHO

Tobacco growing causes massive harm to the environment through extensive use of chemicals, energy and water, and pollution from manufacturing and distribution, WHO said. The United Nations agency called for the tobacco industry to compensate for its products that contribute to greenhouse gases blamed for climate change, but gave no estimate of damage. The ecological footprint goes far beyond the effects of cigarette smoke, WHO said in its first report on tobacco’s impact on the environment. “From start to finish, the tobacco life cycle is an overwhelmingly polluting and damaging process”

May 30, 2017
Reuters

Big data maps India's human traffic hot spots

An Indian charity (My Choices Foundation) is using big data to pinpoint human trafficking hot spots in a bid to prevent vulnerable women and girls vanishing from high-risk villages into the sex trade. Specifically designed technology identifies villages that are most at risk of modern slavery, then launches local campaigns to sound the alarm

May 31, 2017
Trust.org

Trans, gender non-conforming people report poorer health

People who identify as transgender or gender nonconforming may have higher than average rates of poor or fair health, a new study suggests. For this report researchers used data collected in 2014 and 2015 looking at responses from 315,893 people including 1,443 who identified as transgender or nonconforming gender. About 23% of the transgender group reported poor or fair health, compared to 17% in the non-gender minority group. The gender minority group were also likely to be low income, unemployed, uninsured for health, overweight or have unmet medical needs or to report depression

May 30, 2017
Reuters

Sri Lanka races to rescue flood victims as toll rises

Helicopters are searching for people marooned four days after the worst floods and mudslides to hit Sri Lanka in 14 years overcame parts of the country`s southwest, killing at least 164 people. With more rain expected, rescuers were racing to evacuate villagers from the most vulnerable areas as emergency teams rushed to distribute aid to nearly half a million people driven from their homes by the island`s worst flooding in a decade. Some 104 people were still listed as missing, the country`s Disaster Management Centre said while another 88 remained in hospital

May 29, 2017
AlJazeera, Straits Times

Dar rivers in danger of drying up

Human and industrial activities around Mzinga and Kizinga streams as well as Mpiji and Msimbazi rivers have polluted them. People living around the areas have turned the streams and rivers into dumpsites and disturbed alignments and natural water. The rivers are being polluted by the concentration of high organic and nutrient, low dissolved oxygen, and high counts of indicator organisms from home and industrial activities, environmental experts told the press

May 28, 2017
The Citizen , AllAfrica.com

Creating awareness on adolescent health through street plays

Adolescent Clubs performed street plays in Peren district and Kohima to create awareness on adolescent health and Non Communicable Diseases on May 27. The programmes were organized by District Health Society. They focused on teenage pregnancy and early marriage – Adolescent Reproductive & Sexual Health (ARSH) and Non Communicable Diseases (NCD) – prevention and control of cancer, hypertension, diabetes and cardiovascular diseases

May 28, 2017
Morung Express

‘Scheme for empowering girls is in doldrums’

Awareness about the Rajiv Gandhi Scheme for Empowerment of Adolescent Girls (RGSEAG)-SABLA is poor in the State, claim child rights experts. The SABLA scheme was implemented in 2010 across 205 districts in the country. The scheme aims at empowering adolescent girls between 11 and 18 years of age by improving their nutrition and health and teaching them life skills. It also focusses on educating them on their legal rights, reproductive cycle, HIV/AIDS, contraception, menstrual hygiene, marriage, pregnancy and child care

May 29, 2017
The Hindu

In drought-stricken Mali, women manoeuvre for land - and a future

Malian men control access to land and decide which parts women are allowed to farm - that`s a problem for women as erratic weather increases competition for land and harvests. In some cases, crop losses on their own land have led men to encroach on land traditionally farmed by women and even steal women`s crops, according to development workers in the area. But an experiment in securing women`s access to small plots of land - and training them to grow crops in difficult climate conditions - aims to change that

May 29, 2017
Trust.org

‘Baby boxes’ help new moms stick to safer sleep practices

Providing new mothers with a “baby box” - a cardboard bassinet with a mattress and fitted cotton sheet - reduces the likelihood that they’ll adopt the unsafe habit of sharing a bed with their new born, new research shows. A previous survey of 1,200 new moms, conducted by Dr. Megan Heere of Temple University Hospital in Philadelphia and colleagues, found that mothers who received sleep education in the hospital were less likely to bed share, but those who did not have a place for their baby to sleep were at increased risk

May 29, 2017
Reuters

One in five twins dies under age 5 in sub-Saharan Africa - Lancet

One in five twins born in sub-Saharan Africa die before turning age 5, even as infant mortality has dropped for lone babies in the region, scientists say in a new study, this new research report indicated that mortality rate was 213 per 1,000 pregnancies, compared to 11 per 1,000 in Finland as an example. The gravity of these findings calls for policy action, the researchers said

June 1, 2017
Reuters

Online access to abortion pill may be safe alternative to clinics

A study into 1,000 women who used an online telemedicine service to get drugs for medical abortions in the Republic of Ireland and Northern Ireland suggests women can safely use telemedicine to consult with a doctor and get drugs to terminate their pregnancy without surgery. About 85% of the women reported successfully terminating their pregnancies without surgical intervention using medication they received in the mail after providing their medical details and consulting with a trained helpdesk team on how to use the drug. No deaths were reported and less than 3% of the women had complications that required treatment like antibiotics or blood transfusions

June 1, 2017
Reuters

Industry, NGOs On Staff At WHO? Beware Of Revolving Doors, Some Say

WHO said it was aware of the need to be clear on what is considered a sensitive position and it has not been explicitly explained in FENSA, the WHO took the position that sensitive positions are primarily positions which involve sensitive information, which might be proprietary, sensitive, and/or related to WHO norms and standards settings, he said. He added that greater clarity should be provided going forward. The WHO Human Resources Department director sought to reassure member states, explaining all the safeguards in place so that individuals cannot be hired after or during secondment through a back door. The director added that in 2019, when “mobility is mandatory,” most of the international fixed-term positions will be advertised through a compendium, for rotation purposes, and in that context seconded staff are not eligible for applying for positions issued in the compendium

June 6, 2017
IP-Watch

In Poland, Being a Woman Can Be Bad for Your Health

After last year’s attempt to impose a near-total ban on abortion, the ruling Law and Justice (PiS) party has introduced a bill to limit sales of emergency contraception, or the “morning-after pill,” which can prevent pregnancy after unprotected sex, including in cases of rape. Under the pretence of ensuring quality health care, Poland’s Minister of Health said the law is to allow women to get medical advice about “whether these substances negatively affect health.” In reality, it is a pretext to further limit reproductive choice

June 6, 2017
Human Rights Watch

France urges U.N. backing of W.Africa force to tackle terrorism, trafficking

France on Tuesday proposed that the United Nations Security Council back a West African force to combat terrorism, drug and human trafficking by "eradicating the actions" of Islamist militants and organized crime groups in the Sahel region. The vast, arid zone has in recent years become a breeding ground for jihadist groups - some linked to al Qaeda and Islamic State - that European nations, particularly France, fear could threaten Europe if left unchecked

June 6, 2017
Trust.org

Less than a third of women hit weight gain target in pregnancy

The majority of women gain too much or too little weight during pregnancy, putting both mothers and babies at an increased risk for complications, a review of past studies suggests, researchers examined data from 23 studies covering a total of more than 1.3 million pregnancies and found 47 percent of the time women gained more weight than recommended by the Institute of Medicine (IOM) - about 25 to 35 pounds for people who start out pregnancy at a normal weight. Another 23 percent of the time, women didn’t gain enough weight. Too little pregnancy weight gain was associated with a higher risk of undersized and premature infants, while too much weight gain was linked to greater odds of oversized babies and caesarean section, or surgical deliveries, researchers report in JAMA

June 6, 2017
Reuters

Farm pollutants affect neighbours’ lungs

Air pollution from large-scale livestock farms impairs lung function in neighbours who live nearby, a new study from the Netherlands shows, in this study, the team measured several markers of lung function in 2,308 adults who lived in 12 villages near, but not on, farms in the Netherlands, which has one of the world’s highest population densities as well as one of the highest livestock farm densities. The study also showed that neighboring residents’ lung function was reduced during weeks with higher levels of farm-related ammonia air pollution. The effects on breathing patterns were small but significant

June 6, 2017
Reuters

Adopting the sustainable development goals is a business opportunity for Australia

The Business and Sustainable Development Commission, through research conducted by AlphaBeta, shows that the implementation of the SDGs in four major global systems – food and agriculture, cities, energy and materials, and health and wellbeing – could generate tremendous business opportunities. Worldwide the SDGs could unlock US$12tn in business savings and revenues by 2030 through 60 high-potential opportunities for the private sector. In Australia, many of those opportunities are substantial. A big push on the provision of affordable housing could be worth an extra $8bn in revenue annually. A faster rollout of renewable energy could be especially valuable in Australia, creating more than $9bn worth of economic opportunities by 2030. Wider usage of remote monitoring technologies in healthcare could generate savings worth $11bn a year by 2030

June 6, 2017
The Guardian

Fund crunch delays rescue of India's bonded labourers - activists

India`s plans to rescue more than 18 million bonded labourers by 2030 have been delayed by a lack of funds, activists said, calling for stricter law enforcement to end one of the most prevalent forms of human trafficking in the country. A year after the Indian government announced a scheme to assist bonded labourers - including a fivefold increase in compensation for these exploited workers - many rescues have been postponed because funding has not come through. The 1 million-rupee ($15,500) funds mandated for each district have not yet been created in southern India, according to Krishnan Kandasamy of the non-profit National Adivasi Solidarity Council, a network for indigenous peoples` welfare

June 6, 2017
Trust.org

Venezuela crisis forces women to sell sex in Colombia, fuels slavery risk

As a humanitarian and political crisis in neighbouring Venezuela deepens, growing numbers of Venezuelan women are working in bars and brothels across Colombia, at this moment, there are around 4,500 Venezuelan sex workers in Colombia, some working in the capital, others in Caribbean tourist resorts and even in far-flung Amazon villages near the Brazilian border, according to ASMUBULI, a Colombian sex workers association. Campaigners and the United Nations say Venezuelan migrant women and men selling sex in Colombia are at high risk of being trafficked into forced prostitution but little is known about the true scale of the largely invisible problem

June 5, 2017
Trust.org

Traffickers lure Indian girls into sex slavery with 'Taj Mahal' promise

Human traffickers in India are luring village girls into sex slavery with promises of visiting the Taj Mahal, a charity said, as criminal gangs find new ways to enslave the poor, so much so that they form part of the almost 46 million people enslaved worldwide - trafficked into brothels, forced into manual labour, victims of debt bondage or even born into servitude - according to the 2016 Global Slavery Index. Forty percent, or more than 18 million, are in India. Many are from poor rural regions and lured with the promise of good jobs or marriage but end up sold into prostitution, domestic work, or industries such as brick kilns or textile units

June 5, 2017
Trust.org

Child brides are on the rise in India's towns and cities - report

An increasing number of underage girls in India’s towns and cities are being married off, a study has revealed, challenging long-held assumptions that child marriage in the country is largely a rural phenomenon. Child marriage is illegal in India, but it is deeply rooted and accepted in society and is widespread in some parts of the country. Data from the 2011 census shows more than 5m girls were married before the legal age of 18. Yet while the number of underage brides declined by 0.3% in rural areas, they have increased by 0.7% in urban parts, according to the National Commission for the Protection of Child Rights and the charity Young Lives

June 2, 2017
Trust.org

Lack of 'safe' jobs keeping educated women from work in India

A lack of safe workplaces in India and the danger of reaching them by public transport is keeping more educated women out of the labour force, hurting the economy and leaving women more vulnerable. Nearly two-thirds of Indian women with college degrees are without jobs, pushing female participation in the labour force to 27%, among the lowest in the world, from nearly 40% a decade ago, according to the World Bank

June 2, 2017
Trust.org

Breastfeeding linked to lower endometrial cancer risk

Women who breastfeed their babies for the recommended six months may also be lowering their own risk of developing endometrial cancer, a new study suggests. In the analysis of data from 17 past studies, researchers found that women who had breastfed for the established period were less likely to be diagnosed with endometrial cancer

June 1, 2017
Reuters

Exclusive: Pupils risking their lives as mental health services collapse

The Times Educational Supplement relates the story that some British youngsters are so desperate for mental health support in a system which has almost totally collapsed, that they are going through the motions of suicide to qualify for help

June 2, 2017
Times Educational Supplement, Independent

Cost of childbirth at private hospitals in Tamil Nadu 70% more than national average

Tamil Nadu may boast of high maternal and child health indices, but that comes at a hefty price tag. Expectant mothers head to private hospitals for better treatment but pay 13 times more than what they would at government hospitals, a new study has found. The cost of childbirth at private facilities is 70% higher than the national average, according to a new study

June 5, 2017
Times of India

Climate change will ruin Hawaii, new study finds

A new report into the impact of climate change on Hawaii has some worrying findings: rising temperatures will lead to a surge in heat related diseases (dengue, cholera), warm oceans will lead to coral bleaching, rainfall will decline more and more leading to lower aquifers with implications for agriculture, wildlife and water access, warming air will pave the way for invasive species to thrive and shorelines will retreat

June 2, 2017
ZME Science

US Gives Up Its Attempt To Prevent Listing Gender Equality As A Human Right

Leaders from the G7-countries will sign a statement that includes a reference to human rights when defining gender equality, a big diplomatic victory for Canada. Ivanka Trump is said to have played a significant role in helping leaders to shift Donald Trump from an opponent to support the proposition

May 26, 2017
BuzzFeed.com

Rural water access: why should countries follow Paraguay’s lead?

With more than 94% of the rural population able to access safe water, nations across Latin America and beyond should consider learning from Paraguay’s success story. Paraguay moved its sanitation and water agency to the auspices of the health department. It set up model community-led boards run by volunteers in the more remote rural areas to manage water and sanitation. They recover the maintenance and operating costs through setting water tariffs and repay a portion of capital costs used to build the initial infrastructure back to the treasury

May 26, 2017
The Guardian

Vietnam urged to stop rising trend of caesarean section deliveries

The Vietnamese government should intervene to reduce the rate of caesarean section deliveries, which has been rising in the country, an International Federation of Gynaecology and Obstetrics (FIGO) official said. In Vietnam the rate was only 12.45 in 2003 and it has risen sharply to 33% in 2008 and it is now higher still

May 22, 2017
Vietnam Plus

Eclampsia in pregnancy: Sleep apnoea increases risk of life threatening condition by 195%

Women diagnosed with obstructive sleep apnoea are at a greater risk of suffering serious pregnancy complications, health experts said. These include hypertensive disorders such as pre-eclampsia and eclampsia or gestational diabetes. The study presented at the American Thoracic Society’s Annual International Conference, drew on medical data from more than a million pregnant women across the USA

May 22, 2017
International Business Times

Maternal healthcare expenses push 46.6% mothers in India into poverty: Study

A new study found that maternal healthcare expenses push 46.6% of mothers in India into poverty – with the illiterate being especially susceptible – according to a December 2016 study by researchers at Jawaharlal Nehru University and the Indian Institute of Technology

May 22, 2017
Hindustan Times

Spreading south, jihadist violence threatens future of children in central Mali

The growing Islamist threat in central Mali has hit farming and shut down hundreds of schools, while a nationwide state of emergency restricts movement – hindering aid delivery and making it harder for people to access services like healthcare. With aid agencies stretched thin already, at least 3.8m people across Mali will need food aid this year, up from 2.5m in 2016, according to OCHA. More than half of those in need are children, who also run the risk of being recruited if they are not at school

May 22, 2017
Reuters

UN health agency slammed for high travel costs

According to internal documents obtained by the Associated Press, WHO routinely spends about $200m a year on travel expenses, more than what it doles out to fight some of the biggest problems in public health, including AIDS, tuberculosis and malaria combined. Last year, WHO spent $71m on AIDS and hepatitis. It devoted $61m to malaria. To slow the spread of tuberculosis WHO invested $59m. Some agency programmes, though, do get healthy budgets – the agency spends $450m trying to wipe out polio every year

May 22, 2017
Washington Post, TelesurTV
May 21, 2017
New York Post, STAT News
May 22, 2017
Dagens Naeringsliv

Girls account for nearly 80 per cent of new HIV infections in Africa-WHO

WHO said that girls represent nearly 80% of all new HIV infections in Africa. Recent data showed that only 13% of adolescent boys had been tested for HIV in the past 12 months in the region. In spite of the large numbers of adolescents, African governments have few policies or plans in place to encourage testing, or a deeper understanding of subjects such as HIV/AIDS, contraception or the need for screening/testing in the first place

May 22, 2017
Guardian Nigeria

One person every second displaced by conflict, disaster in 2016 - report

In 2016, nearly 7 million people, mostly from Africa or the Middle East, were displaced by conflict, while 24 million in Asia were forced to flee because of storms, floods or wildfires, according to data from the Internal Displacement Monitoring Centre. Unlike refugees, who seek asylum in other countries, internally displace people cannot claim international protection, IDMC says

May 22, 2017
Trust.org

Capetonians warned that 100 liters water usage 'non-negotiable'

The city of Cape Town has issued a warning to all water users informing them that all water usage must be brought down by 100m litres immediately. The warning comes after the Western Cape Premier Helen Zille officially declared the Western Cape a disaster area

May 22, 2017
iol.co.za

World lags on clean-energy goals

It may be the 21st century but more than 3bn people still use fire for cooking and heating. Of those, 1bn people have no access to electricity, despite a global effort launched at the 2011 Vienna Energy Forum to bring electricity to everyone on the planet. The 2015 SDG 7 was a unanimous promise to bring decarbonized, decentralized energy to everyone, and that this would transform the world bringing clean air, new jobs, warm schools, clean buses, pumped water and better yields of nutritious food. Speakers at the Vienna Energy Forum said we are falling behind and need to move faster in pursuit of this goal

May 21, 2017
Business Mirror

Radio aimed at Nicaragua's Miskito women takes on violence, trafficking

Airing from dusk to dawn, six days a week, broadcast along the country’s impoverished north Atlantic Coast, a new radio station is being hailed by UN Women and campaigners as a key way to reach indigenous communities plagued by violence against women and girls. Powered mainly on solar radio, it is the first and only radio station dedicated to women’s rights in their native language

May 22, 2017
Reuters

Hawaii faces more flooding with possible record high tides

Hawaii will likely suffer more coastal flooding this week driven by record high tides and this is a symptom of global warming that will become routine in decades if no action is taken on emissions experts warn, they also say global sea levels will drive flooding many times a year by 2050 and this may pose serious risks for places like Hawaii during storm seasons

May 22, 2017
Trust.org

Indian activists hail minister's call to end female genital mutilation

Women activists campaigning to end FGM in a minority Muslim community in India, hailed a minister’s pledge to introduce a law to end this centuries old custom. FGM is carried out by the Dawoodi Bohra community which considers the secretive practice an obligation

May 22, 2017
Trust.org

Nurture over nature

A new paper published by the Centre for Economic Policy Research has come up with crucial findings that provide evidence against the idea that genetic factors explain the disappointing growth performance of Indian children

May 22, 2017
The Hindu

Myanmar children in conflict-hit areas risk getting left behind: U.N.

About 2.2m children living in remote and conflict ridden parts of Myanmar could be left behind, as the country rapidly develops following decades of military rule, the UN has warned. UNICEF is calling for greater humanitarian access to these regions so as to ensure that youngsters in the country have a brighter future. Although social and economic measures rolled out by the new government have improved health, education and protection for children, the country’s remotest parts are yet to benefit

May 23, 2017
Reuters

Climate change court cases on the rise globally, majority in U.S.

A growing number of people are turning to the courts to try and overturn government decisions seen to exacerbate climate change, according to a global survey of climate change litigation published on Tuesday. Some 884 climate change cases have been filed by March, in 24 countries in Africa, Asia, Pacific, Europe and the Americas. The USA has the highest number of cases – 654, according to the survey, which was carried out by UN Environment and the Columbia Law School’s Sabin Center for Climate Change Law

May 23, 2017
Trust.org

Middle-management 'disconnected' from Sustainable Development Goals, report finds

A study released by Frost & Sullivan and GlobeScan on behalf of CSR Europe found that while SDGs are being embraced by business leaders and sustainability professionals, a lack of collaboration with other areas of business is stunting progress towards these goals. The report says top management are aware of SDGs while middle-management and wider employees are disconnected from the narrative

May 25, 2017
Edie.net

Mexico urges wealthy nations to help poorer states cut disaster risk

Mexican President Enrique Pena Nieto told the start of a UN conference in Cancun that cutting human, economic and infrastructure losses caused by disasters is imperative. Threats from earthquakes and storms recognise no national boundaries or frontiers or orders of government and ninety percent of deaths happen in low or middle-income countries. Wealthy nations need to help the poorer nations that will face the sharp-end of climate change afford to develop the resilience in planning for these disasters

May 25, 2017
Reuters

Why ‘gig health’ matters

Those who make their living in the gig economy, generally working for app-based platforms that match consumer needs with workers who can fulfil them are regarded as being in precarious or contingent employment. Now attention is turning to the health and wellbeing of this fast growing workforce, which numbers about 1.3m in the UK. A recent Italian study indicated those on temporary contracts are more likely to use prescription medication for mental health conditions like depression. Gig workers are not generally eligible for sick pay or compensation from injury. Low pay, low support, high demand mean long hours to make a basic income stoking future physical and mental health issues

May 25, 2017
Financial Times

Gay rights in China get fillip from Taiwan same-sex marriage ruling

Taiwan’s decision giving same-sex couple the right to marry has proven to be a shot in the arm for the gay rights movement in Asia, but even so, it is still likely to be many years before China approves similar measures, amid deep-rooted opposition in some quarters. Wednesday’s ruling may prompt legal action by activists in places like Thailand, home to Southeast Asia’s most vibrant lesbian, gay, bisexual and transgender communities to travel a similar path

May 26, 2017
Reuters

Funding shortfall hits starving in northeast Nigeria

Lack of funding is forcing aid agencies to cut feeding for starving people in northeast Nigeria, the UN said, warning of growing pressure in resources as refugees return. The World Food Programme said nearly two million people were living on the brink of famine in this remote region, which has been devastated by Boko Haram violence since 2009. According to OCHA, 5.2m people could need life-saving food aid in three northeast states from June to August

May 26, 2017
Guardian Nigeria
May 25, 2017
News24

Island nation Kiribati says in dire need of cash to combat climate change

The Pacific Island nation of Kiribati is in dire need of aid as drought pushes it closer to declaring a state of emergency as it struggles with rising seas and other effects of climate change which could cost billions. Comprised of 33 coral islands, Kiribati is on average just 2 metres above sea level. It has seen the ocean swallow chunks of its coastline, raising the prospect it may be the first nation to become a casualty of global warming

May 26, 2017
Reuters

As surgeries triple, Kenya aims to end shame of fistula

Kenya’s hopes of ending incontinence caused by fistula, one of the most serious childbirth injuries, are rising as more women are receiving surgery as more local surgeons are being trained, and awareness of the stigmatizing condition grows. Fistula repairs have tripled to 1,500 a year nationwide since the start of the decade, according to Gynocare, one of Kenya’s leading fistula treatment centres. The Fistula Foundation has helped train six more surgeons and aims to provide 1,200 free surgeries in three years. It is committed to helping end fistula in a generation

May 25, 2017
Reuters

Violence in central Congo leaves 400,000 children prey to deadly malnutrition - UN

Spiralling violence in the central Democratic Republic of the Congo has disrupted farming and shut down health centres, leaving hundreds of thousands of children vulnerable to life-threatening malnutrition, UNICEF said. An insurrection in the Greater Kasai region has left hundreds dead and uprooted more than 1m people since last July, the UN warned of a dramatically deteriorating situation

May 24, 2017
Trust.org

US drug laws aimed at pregnant women stop them seeking healthcare: Amnesty

Amnesty International said that US state laws used to prosecute pregnant women who take drugs are stopping them from seeking help from health services and this is a violation of their rights, so a human rights group sounded the alarm in a report about the increasing practice of charging pregnant women addicted to drugs with endangering their own foetus. It said this has undermined efforts in recent years to treat the addiction of thousands of women

May 23, 2017
Reuters

India's 'anti-human trafficking caravan' tours villages and towns

India is using music, street plays and puppet shows, to educate and entertain villagers across the country about the dangers of human trafficking. The project is the brainchild of the U.S. Consulate in Kolkata and is a novel attempt to raise public awareness about trafficking and slavery in a country where such crimes are widespread and on the rise

May 23, 2017
Trust.org

Abused infants may slip through the cracks in hospital systems

Researchers behind a study say infants who are victims of severe physical abuse are mostly under one year old and arrive ‘by stealth’ at hospitals, often hours after injury. This means from the start, these abused infants are less likely to get the attention they need. A delay in diagnosis, a delay in key urgent treatments, which combined means they fare less well than those accidentally injured

May 23, 2017
Reuters

Nigeria's hungriest face starvation as aid funds dry up in northeast - UN

The United Nations and aid agencies are warning that northeast Nigeria is on the brink of famine after two years of missed harvests, with a third missed year very likely. Aid agencies also say they need aid funds to help. The WFP indicated that these hungry people could miss out on food aid next month, because it is running out of money to feed them. The regional director says it needs another $250m to prevent famine in the coming months and to feed 4.7m people, which the WFP worries could rise even as high as 5.2m by August

May 23, 2017
Trust.org

Hunger to hit emergency levels in Ethiopia despite rains

Hunger is likely to reach emergency levels in Ethiopia and the number in need of food aid will rise further, experts said, as drought has decimated livestock, rains have been erratic and aid is in short supply. The number of Ethiopians needing food aid will rise beyond the current 7.7m, with hunger reaching the fourth ‘emergency level’ on a five-phase scale, where the fifth level is famine

May 24, 2017
Trust.org

Domestic violence pushes Central American women to flee for their lives - U.N.

Rampant domestic violence is forcing women to flee their homes in Central America, the UN refugee agency said, as it urged governments to work together to address the reasons for migration in the region. Hundreds of thousands of people, including women and children travelling alone, leave the ‘Northern Triangle’ of nations; El Salvador, Honduras and Guatemala to escape gang violence and poverty. Many head north to the United States to seek refuge and a better life

May 24, 2017
Trust.org

Children bear brunt of militia violence in central Congo

Children in central Democratic Republic of Congo are bearing the brunt of violence between the army and a local militia which has uprooted at least 1.4 million people over the past year, UNICEF said. Six in 10 of those forced to flee their homes in the conflict-ravaged Kasai region - about 850,000 - are children, leaving them prey to attack, detention, sexual violence, and recruitment by militia fighters, according to the U.N. agency

July 28, 2017
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