| | |

Tag search: "Healthcare"

WHO elections

World Health Assembly Elects Tedros Adhanom Ghebreyesus as New WHO Director

The newly elected head of the United Nations World Health Organization (WHO),Tedros Adhanom Ghebreyesus, outlined his priorities for journalists at the agency’s headquarters today in Geneva, where he stressed the need for Member States to provide healthcare for all and to implement global health regulations.

May 29, 2017
Normangee Star

The top job, a tough job

“All roads leads to universal coverage. This will be my central priority” newly elected WHO director general, Tedros Adhanom told World Health Assembly members. He also promised to respond to future global emergencies “rapidly and effectively”

May 28, 2017
Hindu

Candidate for WHO top post David Nabarro is all for making healthcare affordable

David Nabarro told the Economic Times that if elected he would transform the UN body into a dependable and predictable organization and strive to make healthcare affordable. Extreme inequalities in different parts of the world is hampering people from accessing health services and this is an area that needs WHO’s attention

May 2, 2017
Economic Times

Promoting health through the life course

Chained to health ministry, Peruvians protest mining pollution

Parents of sick children who live near one of Peru`s oldest mining pits camped out in front of the health ministry in Lima for an eighth day on Thursday, demanding help to deal with the impact of decades of mining pollution. Dozens of residents of Simon Bolivar, a district in the city of Cerro de Pasco in the Peruvian Andes, travelled to Lima to press the government to declare a health emergency and build a regional hospital specializing in exposure to heavy metals. More than 40 percent of the area`s children who were tested in a 2012 study had dangerously high levels of lead in their blood, according to a screening of some 2,700 children by regional health authorities

June 23, 2017
Reuters

U.N. rights expert urges Myanmar to protect detained Rohingya children

Myanmar should guarantee the rights and medical care of children from the Rohingya Muslim minority detained in an army crackdown launched in October, a U.N. human rights investigator said. Speaking at the U.N. Human Rights Council in Geneva, Yanghee Lee said children should not be "arbitrarily deprived of their liberty" and she urged the government to investigate the death of a child who, according to the government, died because of ill health in February. The government did not report the death until last week, she said

June 15, 2017
Trust.org

Cry for Venezuela

Not so long ago, Venezuela enjoyed a semblance of comfort, security and hope; The Globe and Mail’s Stephanie Nolen reports that it is now a shambles, the people suffering from inadequate health care, food shortages – and government that appears to be looking out for its own, sometimes brutally

June 9, 2017
Globe and Mail

In Poland, Being a Woman Can Be Bad for Your Health

After last year’s attempt to impose a near-total ban on abortion, the ruling Law and Justice (PiS) party has introduced a bill to limit sales of emergency contraception, or the “morning-after pill,” which can prevent pregnancy after unprotected sex, including in cases of rape. Under the pretence of ensuring quality health care, Poland’s Minister of Health said the law is to allow women to get medical advice about “whether these substances negatively affect health.” In reality, it is a pretext to further limit reproductive choice

June 6, 2017
Human Rights Watch

Cost of childbirth at private hospitals in Tamil Nadu 70% more than national average

Tamil Nadu may boast of high maternal and child health indices, but that comes at a hefty price tag. Expectant mothers head to private hospitals for better treatment but pay 13 times more than what they would at government hospitals, a new study has found. The cost of childbirth at private facilities is 70% higher than the national average, according to a new study

June 5, 2017
Times of India

Abused infants may slip through the cracks in hospital systems

Researchers behind a study say infants who are victims of severe physical abuse are mostly under one year old and arrive ‘by stealth’ at hospitals, often hours after injury. This means from the start, these abused infants are less likely to get the attention they need. A delay in diagnosis, a delay in key urgent treatments, which combined means they fare less well than those accidentally injured

May 23, 2017
Reuters

Spreading south, jihadist violence threatens future of children in central Mali

The growing Islamist threat in central Mali has hit farming and shut down hundreds of schools, while a nationwide state of emergency restricts movement – hindering aid delivery and making it harder for people to access services like healthcare. With aid agencies stretched thin already, at least 3.8m people across Mali will need food aid this year, up from 2.5m in 2016, according to OCHA. More than half of those in need are children, who also run the risk of being recruited if they are not at school

May 22, 2017
Reuters

Maternal healthcare expenses push 46.6% mothers in India into poverty: Study

A new study found that maternal healthcare expenses push 46.6% of mothers in India into poverty – with the illiterate being especially susceptible – according to a December 2016 study by researchers at Jawaharlal Nehru University and the Indian Institute of Technology

May 22, 2017
Hindustan Times

Indian activists hail minister's call to end female genital mutilation

Women activists campaigning to end FGM in a minority Muslim community in India, hailed a minister’s pledge to introduce a law to end this centuries old custom. FGM is carried out by the Dawoodi Bohra community which considers the secretive practice an obligation

May 22, 2017
Trust.org

HRT could increase the risk of deafness, major study finds

Women who take HRT to help them cope with symptoms of the menopause could face an increased risk of deafness, a landmark study suggests. The research on more than 80,000 women found that those who took hormone replacement therapy for between five and ten years had a 15% higher risk of hearing loss. And those who took it for longer had a still greater chance of suffering from deafness, the mass study said. Scientists said it was not clear why the pills were linked to a higher chance of hearing loss

May 10, 2017
Telegraph, EurekAlert, NDTV

Gut bacteria may help explain benefits of breastfeeding

Breastfeeding has long been linked to a variety of health benefits in babies and a new study suggests that bacteria transferred from mothers to their nursing infants might at least be partly responsible. Researchers found gut microbial communities matched the bacteria in their mothers’ milk and on their mothers’ skin much more than it resembled samples from other women in the study

May 9, 2017
Reuters

Kenya hopes to double maternity leave to boost mother and child health

Kenya is hoping to pass a new law which will see maternity leave increased to six months from three if a bill before parliament is passed in a bid to boost the health of mothers and babies. The bill is opposed by employer groups who say businesses cannot afford to give women the time off, even though the second three months would be optional, unpaid leave

May 8, 2017
Reuters

African countries to feel worst of US health aid cuts, report says

New findings from the Kaiser Family Foundation indicate that African countries, and those where abortion services are legal, will likely feel the greatest impact of the U.S. ‘global gag rule’ – also known as the Mexico City Policy. The U.S. provided bilateral global health assistance to 65 countries in fiscal year 2016, and more than half of them (34) were African. With the reintroduction of this policy $8bn in U.S. global health assistance is at stake which was previously tied to just U.S. family planning funding. Potentially expanded guidelines for funding roll this out wider across the 34 nations and encourage NGOs to discontinue legal activities in order to comply

May 5, 2017
Devex

Scientists develop fluid-filled artificial womb to help premature babies

Scientists in the United States have developed a fluid-filled womb-like bag known as an extra-uterine support device that could transform care for extremely premature babies, thereby significantly increasing their chances of survival

April 26, 2017
Reuters, Fortune, Times of India, Washington Post

Green the red: Indian city breaks taboos for "sustainable menstruation"

The Indian city of Thiruvananthapuram is leading the way in breaking the taboo surrounding menstruation as it seeks to ‘green the red’ and develop a sustainable menstruation project promoted by the city’s civic authority. From vending machines dispensing cotton pads to awareness campaign and higher disposal fees for girls and women using disposable pads, the city of more than 1.5m is taking measures to help women switch to eco-friendly menstruation products

April 25, 2017
Trust.org

WHO says 69% of pregnant women lack access to preventive malaria treatment in Africa

In a statement ahead of World Malaria Day, WHO called on all malaria endemic countries in Africa to urgently improve access to preventative malaria treatment and other critical tools for pregnant women on the continent. Despite progress made in malaria prevention in pregnant women in Africa, 69% of them are still not receiving the recommended doses of intermittent treatment in pregnancy therapy required for protection against malaria infection

April 21, 2017
Financial Nigeria

Rape victims in U.S. made to pay part of the medical bill

Women who have been sexually assaulted in the U.S. often bear some costs for testing and other medical treatment when they report rape to authorities, a new study says. Victims with private insurance pay on average $950, or 14% of the cost of medical services, and the insurers pay the balance, researchers found. With other violent crimes, victims are not responsible for paying for the damage that results from the crime. The financial burden adds to the emotional burden of the assault

April 20, 2017
Reuters

Why Assam’s two-child policy plan is being criticized by public health experts

Assam has proposed a new population policy for the state which penalises people who have more than two children. If the draft becomes law they would be ineligible for government jobs and benefits and be barred from contesting all elections under the state election commission. Analysts believe this move by the BJP-led state government is directed at Bengali-speaking Muslim immigrants who are perceived to have larger families. Activist believe this policy is unconstitutional and violates rights of citizens

April 12, 2017
Scroll India

Most doctors' breast cancer advice may be out of date

A new study says that women may be getting contradictory advice on when they should start having a regular mammogram. The study found some doctors suggesting between the ages of 40 and 44 (81%) and others between the ages of 45 and 49 (89%), advice with contradicts U.S. Federal recommendations which say start at age 50

April 10, 2017
Time

Brasil fecha mais de 10 mil leitos pediátricos em seis anos

A survey by the Brazilian Society of Pediatrics (SBP) said more than 10 thousand pediatric beds in hospitals and clinics have disappeared from the public health network over the last seven years. In November last year there were 38,200 beds. In 2010, Brazil had 48,300 places for children who needed to stay in hospital overnight for more than 24 hours. The reduction in the number of beds has a direct impact on care causing delays in diagnosis in a population that is steadily growing in numbers

March 28, 2017
Gaucha Blogs

Durex Wants to Break India's Condom-Buying Taboo

India has condom use of less than 6% in a country also battling the world’s third highest HIV burden. It also has more married women without family planning than any other country. Reckitt Benckiser Group is trying to counter that with its release in India of ‘Durex Jeans,’ two condom packs in packaging resembling the leather patches sewn on denim jeans and displayed in jar-like bowls on drugstore counters. The aim is to help consumers overcome the embarrassment of buying a product linked with sex, a taboo subject in conservative India

March 26, 2017
Bloomberg

Bid to reduce HIV infection in babies

Thai health authorities have set themselves the goal of cutting the transmission rate of HIV from mother to child to less than 1% within the next three years. The campaign includes preventative medical support measures in tandem with education and support on HIV prevention to pregnant women, via a series of campaigns

March 25, 2017
Bangkok Post

Young Rohingya Mothers flee Persecution

The UN said the Myanmar army has committed mass killings, gang rapes and burned villages in a campaign that may amount to ethnic cleansing in Rakhine state and Rohingya, where families have been forced to flee for their lives

March 22, 2017
Jakarta Globe
March 21, 2017
International Business Times

Protests against abortion bill in Angola

Some 200 demonstrators protested in Luanda against a draft law criminalizing all abortions, which is set to be voted on by parliament in the next few days. The proposed law punishes anyone who has an abortion, or performs one, with up to 10 years in prison

March 18, 2017
Deutsche Welle, Public Radio International
March 20, 2017
TVC News

On International Women’s Day UNAIDS is urging countries to stop 1 million women and girls from...

UNAIDs released a new report showing there is an urgent need to scale up HIV prevention and treatment services for women and girls. In 2015 there were 18.6m women and girls living with HIV, with 1m of them becoming newly infected and 470,000 women and girls dying of AIDS related

March 8, 2017
UNAids, Punch Nigeria

Children with HIV write to Modi after Cipla stops drug supplu over non-payment by government

A report in The Hindu said that stocks of Lopinavir syrup (an HIV drug that is child-friendly) were finished after Cipla stopped manufacturing it because of non-payments by the Indian health ministry

March 6, 2017
Outlook India

Preparedness, surveillance and response

Cholera death toll in Yemen reaches at least 180: Red Cross

Cholera has killed at least 184 people in Yemen in recent weeks, the ICRC said on Monday, a day after authorities declared a state of emergency and called for international aid. After more than two years of war which has destroyed much of the nation’s infrastructure only a few medical facilities are still functioning and two-thirds of the population are without access to safe drinking water 

May 15, 2017
Reuters, CNN
May 16, 2017
AlJazeera
May 15, 2017
Wall Street Journal, Sky, Voice of America, France24, CBC

Sube a 9 número de fallecidos por dengue en Piura

Some health centres in the Piura region are buckling at the knees at the volume of dengue cases they are having to admit to the hospitals each day. Deaths from dengue have risen once more and now stand at nine. There are around 8,000 probable dengue cases and 800 confirmed across the region. It is clear to local health experts that there is a need for more doctors to deal with the emergency

April 18, 2017
La Republica, Peru 21
April 17, 2017
Diario Vea, Peru 21

American Samoa declared dengue emergency to access funds

Questions have been raised over American Samoa’s declaration of emergency for a dengue outbreak, after no emergency was declared when people died of dengue two years ago. The health director explained that the territory ‘can get federal money to help prevent, diagnose and treat dengue with such a declaration.’ Two types of dengue fever (types 1 and 3) have been found on Kiribati. Elsewhere, the number of dengue cases is rising in French Polynesia and on Tahiti

March 8, 2017
Radio New Zealand
March 7, 2017
Pacific Islands Report
March 6, 2017
PINA
March 7, 2017
TNTV News
March 6, 2017
Tahiti Info

Non communicable diseases

OPPI to develop integrated disease management process

Speaking at the OPPI Sixth Healthcare Access Summit, Shailesh Ayyangar, President of OPPI and Managing Director of Sanofi India, said, “Collaborating with the government and other stakeholders at national, state and local levels, the summit endeavours to develop and expand an integrated disease management process broadly engaging with affected communities in the fight against non-communicable diseases.” “The good news is that we have therapies that can combat the non-communicable diseases and help patients live a full and normal life by strengthening patient self-management education; community-based supportive services and broad-based community mobilization,” said Ayyangar – this is needed given the scale of the issue and the rising costs of NCDs to the Indian healthcare system

June 9, 2017
Economic Times
June 11, 2017
Hindu Business Line

Obesity costs Asia-Pacific $166 billion annually

A study by the Asian Development Bank Institute suggests that obesity costs about 12% of total healthcare spending in the region per year. So the study concludes that obesity is a serious threat to the prosperity of the region and demands more policymaker attention or the problems will only get worse

June 3, 2017
The Nation

Cancer Taught Me To Love Sunsets

Jheric Delos Angeles, founder of the Lymphoma Philippines Foundation, writes about his experience as a twice diagnosed cancer sufferer in a developing world country who had to raise cash for his treatment and learnt how the technology for treatment is not there in some far flung places. Now he is fighting to help create better access to healthcare for fellow cancer sufferers through his foundation

June 1, 2017
Huffington Post

Non-communicable diseases: Serious health concerns

In an opinion article for The Himalayan Times the publication calls on the government to target existing human resources and re-equip them in order to help promote health and prevent disease across Nepal. It argues that if the country is able to harness the potential that its primary healthcare offers, it can become a vital platform for a concerted response to the growing problem of non-communicable diseases

May 23, 2017
Himalayan Times

NCDs: Answer lies in early screening, prevention

The New Times Rwanda takes an in-depth look at how the Rwandan health authorities in the Gaghengeri Sector, Rwamagana District, are starting to use early screening and diagnosis to tackle the emerging burden of non-communicable diseases, which are threatening to overwhelm the healthcare system

May 22, 2017
New Times Rwanda

Umbrella coverage for all: Here’s why India must focus on universal insurance coverage

According to the Aaarogya Bharat Report, the Indian non-communicable disease burden is exploding and it is estimated it will cost the country $6.2tr by 2030. Early detection and management of such diseases is essential to keeping a lid on any potential exploding health costs. The writer says the country needs to focus on preventative and primary care through greater public spending and broader engagement with stakeholders such as technology, media, schools and food companies

May 12, 2017
Financial Express

Tanzania: Challenges of Caring for Cancer Patients in Tanzania

There are three main causes: ageing population, rapid unplanned urbanization and the globalisation of unhealthy lifestyles. NCDs also have some common denominators: tobacco usage, alcohol intake, high blood pressure, diet and physical inactivity – these are acknowledged risk factors. There is a need for reliable statistics to understand the scale of the problem and the resources needed, as well as specialist training for cancer care and the equipment to support it

April 27, 2017
allafrica.com, The Citizen

Mentally ill accessing less U.S. health care

More than 8 million American adults suffer from serious psychological distress and they are less likely to access healthcare services than other people, a new U.S. study says

April 17, 2017
Reuters

We can no longer afford to ignore India’s mental health crisis

In 1990 suicide in India was not among the top killers of Indians, now it is. Some 20% of the Indian population will suffer some form of mental illness in the next few years yet only 10% of them will receive treatment. By 2030, mental illness will reduce economic growth in India and China by $11 trillion, it needs addressing

April 5, 2017
The Quint

RS Passes Bill To Safeguard Rights, Provide Medical Help For HIV/AIDS Patients

A crucial bill to ensure equal rights to people afflicted by HIV and AIDS in getting treatment, admission in educational institutions and jobs was passed by the Rajya Sabbha

March 22, 2017
Huffington Post, News18
March 24, 2017
Hindustan Times
March 21, 2017
First Post
March 22, 2017
zeenews

Abortion is a women’s issue. So why do men dominate media coverage of it?

A new report commissioned by the Women’s Media Center analysed 1,385 pieces of news on abortion, including opinion columns and editorials that appeared in 12 publications and found that men wrote 52% of those pieces which had a by-line attached , while women wrote just 37% of them

March 22, 2017
Washington Post

Venezuela's spiralling mental healthcare crisis

Al Jazeera reports on Venezuela’s economic strife and how the healthcare system is left struggling to cope with the nation’s growing mental health crisis

March 20, 2017
AlJazeera

The GOP health plan may disrupt mental health care for those who need it the most

The GOP health care plan may disrupt mental health care for those who need it the most, because the U.S. States would then have to decide whether to cover the mental health costs for Medicaid recipients or not

March 15, 2017
Vox, NBC News

Health systems

Gaza health care suffers as Palestinian factions play blame game

In what is seen as the latest step in an effort to force Hamas to relinquish its control of Gaza, Abbas in June reduced the payments the PA makes to Israel for electricity it supplies to the territory, meaning that Gaza`s two million people now have only 3 to 4 hours of power a day, forcing hospitals and other medical facilities to rely chiefly on generators and expensive fuel. Hamas says that Abbas restricted transfers of medicine to Gaza in March, accusing Hamas of failing to reimburse the PA for its purchases, and cut the salaries of its officials in May

July 19, 2017
Reuters

'Super-prescribers' on notice: Aetna, CDC team up to tackle antibiotic overuse

While Aetna and the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention play two very different roles in the healthcare world, they have recently begun working toward one common goal: reducing the frequency of unnecessary antibiotic prescriptions. The CDC and Aetna decided to focus on one specific quality measure from the Healthcare Effectiveness Data and Information Set - antibiotic avoidance in adults with acute bronchitis - because of the “sheer number” of antibiotics prescribed for respiratory conditions. Indeed, 44% of antibiotics prescribed in an outpatient setting are for acute respiratory conditions that include bronchitis, and 50% of them are unnecessary, according to a report from The Pew Charitable Trusts

July 10, 2017
Fierce Healthcare

One Nightmare Scenario in Senate Bill: Drug Rationing

Senate Republicans may not realize it, but their repeal-and-replace health-care legislation, if passed, would set the U.S. on the road to European-style price controls and rationing of prescription medications. This would follow fairly directly from the enormous cuts to Medicaid that the bill would impose

June 28, 2017
Bloomberg

When Cutting Access to Health Care, There’s a Price to Pay

A study about equity in access to health care for 21 countries in 2000 revealed that the United States had the highest degree of inequity in doctor use, even higher than Mexico — which is both poorer and generally more inequitable. And as noted in a 2003 study by the Institute of Medicine, insurance status, more than any other demographic or economic factor, determines the timeliness and quality of health care, if it is received at all. A review of studies published this week in Annals of Internal Medicine reported that health insurance substantially raises people’s chances of survival. It improves the diagnosis and treatment of high blood pressure, significantly cutting mortality rates. It reduces death rates from breast cancer and trauma. Over all, the review concluded that health insurance reduces the chance of dying among adults 18 to 64 years old by between 3 and 29 percent

June 27, 2017
New York Times

U.S. Republican healthcare bill imperilled with 22 million seen losing insurance

Twenty-two million Americans would lose insurance over the next decade under the U.S. Senate Republican healthcare bill, a nonpartisan congressional office said, complicating the path forward for the already-fraught legislation. Moderate senators are concerned about millions of people losing insurance. Key conservative senators have said the Senate bill does not do enough to repeal Obamacare. The CBO assessment that an additional 15 million people would be uninsured in 2018 under the bill and its prediction that insurance premiums would skyrocket over the first two years prompted concern from both sides

June 27, 2017
Reuters

Stripping Americans of health insurance could be deadly: study

Health insurance saves lives – that’s the conclusion of a report released just in time to weigh into the debate among Senate Republicans considering a bill that could strip millions of Americans of coverage. “Overwhelming scientific evidence shows that lack of insurance is sometimes deadly,” co-author Dr. David Himmelstein, a professor at the City University of New York’s Hunter College School of Public Health, said. Based on findings from a variety of large studies, Americans without health insurance faced 40 percent higher odds of dying during the study periods than the privately insured, the report found. “Being uninsured is deadly,” co-author Dr. Steffie Woolhandler said. “That was the conclusion from a 2002 Institute of Medicine report. The evidence that’s accumulated over the last 15 years actually strengthens the Institute of Medicine’s conclusions”

June 26, 2017
Reuters

India Fares Miserably in Providing Quality Healthcare Access to Its Citizens

India ranks last amongst all the BRICS nations in quality and access to healthcare, and 178th out of 195 countries worldwide. It even does poorly even compared to all of its neighbours, bar Pakistan. The second largest and the fastest growing economy in the region, India saw its gap widening by 5.5 points, 1.4 points less than Pakistan, in 1990-2015, according to an IndiaSpend analysis of the Healthcare Access and Quality (HAQ) Index published in The Lancet

June 25, 2017
The Wire

President Trump, Meet This 2-Year-Old

The New York Times’ Nick Kristof looks at the consequences of President Trump’s proposed cuts to international aid on a visit to Liberia where he meets a small child sick with malaria and who has suffered the consequences of counterfeit medicine firsthand. He also learns about the horrors of 14 year old girls attempting to self-abort and causing themselves untold damage as the price of healthcare and access to it, were beyond them

June 24, 2017
New York Times

Thiruvananthapuram: Ambulances mere showpieces!

Many of the ambulances available at Government health centres in the district do not cater to patients due to the absence of drivers or their unwillingness to drive, say activists. The crew members of 108 ambulances say that this puts pressure on their fleet which was primarily meant to attend to accident cases. For instance, the ambulance at Nedumanagaud hospital has not been functioning during the dengue epidemic outbreak. The driver appointed by the Public Service Commission has gone on leave citing health issues

June 21, 2017
Deccan Chronicle

Patients in India are not empowered and this leads to distrust: Dr D S Ratna Devi

Dr D S Ratna Devi, CEO, DakshamA Health & Education, New Delhi, talks about the major issues that the patient faces in the current healthcare system, which is ‘all fragmented and once a patient enters into a system they are lost in it, they keep asking questions and they don`t get all answers from one services provider’. ‘There is a lot of variation between what happens in the diagnostic area, treatment area and post treatment. There isn`t information given to the patient and that is why there is a lot of distrust and people don`t feel empowered at all’

June 21, 2017
Economic Times

How to reduce maternal deaths in the worst counties to give birth in

A prioritised set of interventions is to be applied over the next five years in Kenya. The implementation of a framework which would help achieve targets by improving coverage for key indicators. These include increasing skilled deliveries by 87 per cent, antenatal care by 69 per cent, full immunization to 76 per cent, contraceptive use to 73 per cent and pregnant women tested for HIV and post-test counselling to 75 per cent, all by 2020. Experts projected that following this, the absolute number of maternal deaths would reduce from 5,453 in 2014/15 to 3,276. To achieve these goals, the framework suggested key strategies that needed increased investments, including addressing disparities and increasing coverage through prioritising underserved counties and marginalized populations

June 20, 2017
The Star

Counterfeit curers: They claim to be doctors, but they are not

They say they are doctors but they are not. And they are a big reason why India`s healthcare system is not in the best of health. As part of the series Bad Medicine - The Ugly Truth of Indian Healthcare, CNBC TV18`s Archana Shukla uncovers a parallel world of unqualified medical practitioners, who appear to fill gaps in the public health system, but more often than not, create medical complications

June 20, 2017
Money Control

Eight 'absentee' doctors from Gurugram sent packing by Haryana Government

After a stern warning, the Haryana Government finally cracked the whip by dismissing 160 doctors (including eight from Gurugram) for being absent from duty for several weeks. Besides Gurugram, large numbers of doctors that have been dismissed are 10 doctors from Hissar, nine from Bhiwani, eight from Fatehabad and eight from Kurukshetra

June 20, 2017
Millenium Post

Achieving universal health coverage in Kenya through Innovative financing

Every year, one million Kenyans are driven below the poverty line by healthcare-related expenditures. Poverty predisposes them to disease and slows all aspects of growth in the economy. Africa accounts for a quarter of the world’s disease burden but has less than five per cent of the world’s doctors. The continent lags far behind in basic healthcare coverage for services such as immunization, water and sanitation, and family planning. Kenya can institute targeted taxation as an innovative financing policy to complement existing financing mechanisms

June 19, 2017
The Star

Nigeria: 'Nigeria Loses 3,000 Women, Children to Preventable Diseases Daily'

Nigeria loses 3,000 children and women daily to preventable diseases due to poor access to basic healthcare, the Executive Director of the National Primary Healthcare Development Agency, Faisal Shuaib has said. Speaking at a workshop on the Implementation of the Primary Health Care Under One Roof policy, Mr. Shuaib said "Primary Healthcare remains the foundation for reasonable and sustainable changes to the poor health indicators in the sector, since it deals with these preventable diseases"

June 16, 2017
Premium Times Nigeria, AllAfrica.com

Uganda's plan to send 1,000 medical workers to Libya criticised by activists

Uganda is planning to send about 1,000 medical workers to Libya, an official said, a plan criticised by health activists who believe it would further weaken the country`s struggling health care system. Over the last decade, foreign recruiters and employers from the Middle East have increasingly turned to the east African nation for cheap labour. "If they finish safety assessment work today or tomorrow, then we`ll be ready to send these people," an official said, adding they would include a mix of doctors, nurses and other medical personnel

June 16, 2017
Reuters

EAC short of health specialists: report

The East African Community (EAC) partner states have a serious shortage of qualified medical specialists, a recent minister`s report shows. According to the report, the regional bloc currently has less than 44.5 physicians, nurses and midwives per 10,000 people required to fast-track the attainment of health-related sustainable development goals. As a result of the low number of health specialists, EAC partner states cannot provide quality health care to their citizens without addressing the issue of training of human resources for health, both in terms of quality and quantity

June 14, 2017
The Citizen, AllAfrica.com

South Africa's cancer doctor shortage: 'There is a real crisis'

There are no public health radiation oncologists left in the entire city of Durban in South Africa. The city has seen many doctors shift away from the public to the private sector, because the working conditions in public health care have made treating patients virtually impossible. Many of the machines used to diagnose and treat cancer patients are malfunctioning and left in disrepair, despite multiple appeals to fix them

June 13, 2017
CNN

Medics and school staff forcibly recruited in South Sudan's war

Staff working in South Sudan`s health centres and schools have been forcibly recruited by armed groups, causing facilities to close, the United Nations said, as it struggles to provide aid in one of the world`s most dangerous war zones. More than 250 aid workers have been relocated because of fighting this year, almost double the number during the same period in 2016, it said. The U.N. Office for the Coordination of Humanitarian Affairs (OCHA) said at least 14 community volunteers and health workers had reportedly been forcibly recruited by armed groups in Guit county, in the country`s north, as of June 6

June 13, 2017
Reuters

With its increasing population, what is India's great healthcare challenge?

India added 450 million people over the 25 years to 2016, a period during which the proportion of people living in poverty fell by half, and this period of rising prosperity has been marked by a "dual-disease burden", a continuing rise in communicable diseases and a spurt in non-communicable diseases, which accounted for half of all deaths in 2015, up from 42 per cent in 2001-03. The result of this disease burden on a growing and ageing population, economic development and increasing health awareness is a healthcare industry that has grown to $81.3 billion (Rs 54,086 lakh crore) in 2013 and is now projected to grow at 17 per cent by 2020, up from 11 per cent in 1990

June 12, 2017
Economic Times, The News Minute

India’s HIV/Aids bill and its aftermath

Not even two months after India passed the HIV/Aids (Prevention and Control) Bill, 2017, at least five states say they have run out of life-saving HIV drugs: Andhra Pradesh, Bihar, Delhi, Maharashtra and Meghalaya are bearing the brunt of this lack of medicines. There is also a shortage of diagnostic machines and kits in AP, Assam, Bihar, Gujarat, Mizoram, Nagaland and Uttarakhand

June 7, 2017
Newsbytesapp.com

76% Indians without health insurance, forcing them to dip into savings

India added 450 million people over the 25 years to 2016, a period during which the proportion of people living in poverty fell by half, but, this period of rising prosperity has been marked by a “dual-disease burden”, a continuing rise in communicable diseases and a spurt in non-communicable or “lifestyle” diseases, which accounted for half of all deaths in 2015, from 42% in 2001-03. While the private sector dominates healthcare delivery across the country, a majority of the population living below the poverty line (BPL)–the ability to spend Rs 47 per day in urban areas, Rs 32 per day in rural areas–continues to rely on the under-financed and short-staffed public sector for its healthcare needs, as a result of which their healthcare needs remain unmet

June 7, 2017
Business Standard

New WHO chief vows to leave no one behind in healthcare

The new head of the World Health Organization said it was unacceptable that 1 in 17 people still lack access to essential health services and said he aimed to change this under his leadership, Tedros Adhanom said achieving universal health coverage would be a top priority during his five year term as head of the agency

June 6, 2017
Reuters

India must prepare to provide quality health care for all: Dr Nalla G Palaniswami

Economic Times Healthworld interviews Dr Nalla G Palaniswami, chair KMCH, Coimbatore, who explains why India must prepare to provide quality health care for all, pointing to the fact that 40% of the population has no money to pay for advanced treatment and facilities and healthcare must be accessible and affordable to the public

June 4, 2017
Economic Times

CRM report shows poor blood services in Arunchal

The 10th Common Review Mission report of the National Health Mission expressed its concern about the availability of blood services in six Indian states, including Arunchal Pradesh, particularly at the sub-district level. The limited functioning of blood storage units, either due to a lack of trained human resources or non-linkage with a mother blood bank were significant causes

June 4, 2017
Arunchal Times

In Nagaland, Missing Health Services Are a Matter of Life and Death

The Wire tells the story of how massive central funding for health and development in healthcare often goes missing on the ground, leaving residents in remote districts to struggle through and fend for themselves, it does so through the eyes of a farmer from eastern Nagaland

May 27, 2017
Wire India

Cutting HIV and Aids treatments costs in South Africa

About 15% of India’s pharmaceutical exports arrive in Africa and in South Africa, in particular, with the availability of generic antiretrovirals from India leading to a significant drop in the cost of treatment for millions of people with HIV or Aids. The BBC’s Taurai Maduma reports on Africa Business Report for the BBC World Service

May 26, 2017
BBC

India’s dismal record in healthcare

New research by The Lancet shows India ranking at 154 out of 195 countries in terms of access to healthcare, which is worse than Nepal, Bangladesh, Ghana and Liberia. Live Mint takes three comparative charts and shows how relative prosperity in India in many places counts for little if the government significantly underinvests in its own healthcare system

May 24, 2017
Live Mint

Need more focus on health; country’s spending to be 2 per cent of GDP: Owaisi

MIM president Asaduddin Owaisi pitched for increasing India’s health budget to two percent of GDP, he based his comments on points raised in The National Family Health Survey 2015-16 which reported that the country has to focus more on health. The Lok Sabha member said ‘if the country doesn’t spend two percent of GDP on health, then the health indicators in India would be below those of sub-Saharan countries’. He called on the government to focus more on improving health standards

May 23, 2017
Deccan Chronicle, Indian Express, DNA India

Swiss minister condemns attacks on health facilities

Swiss Health Minister, Alain Berset, addressed delegates at the World Health Assembly. He condemned attacks on health workers and health facilities around the world. He urged countries to put the UN Sustainable Development Goals at the centre of health policy and to guarantee health coverage for all, including migrants

May 22, 2017
Swiss.info

Free health care could pose challenge to development - IDB

The problems facing Jamaica’s health sector, especially with free access to public services and treatment, are among several gaps being looked at by the Inter-American Development Bank as it develops its 10-year strategic plan. IDB sources told the Jamaica Gleaner that ‘in some instances free health care can threaten the delivery of sustained quality care and we support a health system model which target those who could afford to pay to improve access for the poor’

May 22, 2017
Jamaica Gleaner

Medicaid cuts coming in Trump budget: Washington Post

US President Trump’s budget proposal, set to be unveiled on Tuesday, will include cuts to Medicaid and propose changes to other assistance programmes for low-income citizens, the Washington Post reported. The Republican healthcare bill seeks to overhaul the national healthcare system and cut more than $800bn over the next 10 years from Medicaid, the government health insurance programme for the poor and the disabled

May 21, 2017
Reuters

2016 sees 302 attacks on health care in 20 countries: WHO

According to WHO, in the first quarter of 2017, there have been some 88 attacks on health facilities and at least 80 people have been killed. WHO said attacks on health workers and ambulances continue with alarming frequency and they have direct consequences for health service delivery, depriving people of often urgently needed care

May 19, 2017
xinhuanet

How did HIV drugs worth 1.8 billion Naira expire in Nigeria?

The Nigerian minister of health said over $3bn worth of HIV drugs expired in storage. This could mean that Nigeria’s stock of HIV drugs is low. The Minister blamed incompetence and poor knowledge of healthcare workers saying there is no excuse for the waste as it adds to the massive cost involved in the HIV prevention campaign

May 19, 2017
Ventures Africa

South Africa: Medics Protest As KZN Health Care System Collapses

The South African Medical Association and public interest law firm SECTION27 warned the Kwa-Zulu-Natal health system is on the point of collapse. On 5th May over a thousand health workers marched tom Durban to highlight the crisis. A memo addressed to the government highlighted the 16 problems which included: shortage of staff caused by unfunded or abolished posts, a lack of medical school graduates, an unwanted overtime policy, failures with equipment procurements, shortages of supplies, problems with medical records and poor management

May 16, 2017
allafrica.com

Indian healthcare must be evidence-based

Nayan Chakravarty, Kavita Tatwadi and Krithika Sambasivan, respectively, head of policy and outreach at IFMR LEAD, a public policy analyst and policy associate at IFMR LEAD, write a joint opinion article for Live Mint, in which they make the case that Indian healthcare policy has relied on pharmaceutical and equipment advances and evidence-based policymaking has been absent when it comes to service delivery and this needs to change

May 11, 2017
Live Mint

Thousands of Cameroonians to benefit from free healthcare soon

Six thousands Cameroonians will soon benefit from free medical services from an international NGO. Mercy Ships will settle at the Douala Sea Port, where it will carry out the ten-month programme. The NGO was invited to Cameroon by the head of state at the backdrop of growing health concerns in the country, especially for the financially unstable. Transportation, lodging and feeding are all free: no patient will remove a penny from their pocket authorities in Yaounde say

May 10, 2017
Cameroon Concord

Doctors are scapegoats for India’s failing health system

The FT’s Amy Kazmin argues that Indian doctors are scapegoats for the country’s failing healthcare system. Public expectations about treatment simply cannot be met without more public spending. Symptoms of the problem are occurring with a growing number of assaults on doctors by patients. India is suffering from an acute doctors shortage, with just one physician for every 1,800 people. Government spending is just 1.4% of GDP, compared with China which spends 3.1%. As a result the healthcare system has neither the manpower nor the equipment to provide a reasonable standard of care for patients

May 8, 2017
Financial Times

Solar power: A shot in the arm for India's health centers

A pilot project is launching in Tamil Nadu, Maharashtra and Haryana states which aims to set up replicable, cost-effective solar power plants at health centres. As the first point of access to a doctor for rural residents, the aim is to increasingly create a more resilient health system in rural India, benefiting primarily women and children

May 5, 2017
Reuters

Drug pricing must be reformed

The FT’s Andrew Jack argues that drug pricing needs to be reformed. Drug companies can sometimes charge more in poorer countries because they focus on middle-class patients who pay for their own care rather than the population at large. The same issues apply in the USA, where insurance cover for patients is patchy. Investigations in the UK show that complex rules governing generic drugs mean manufacturers can increase prices when there are few or no other competitors – so we need greater scrutiny and more transparency in the way drugs are priced

May 5, 2017
Financial Times

Head of NGO fighting for better access to medicine

The Greek publication published an interview with James Love, director of Knowledge Ecology International, an NGO focused on knowledge management and governance. The interview zeroed in on his view that de-linkage of the cost of research from the final cost of a drug is an unavoidable change in pharmaceutical business models, if the world is to find ways of mass producing medicines cheaply, and thus, reduce the cost. Achieving this would allow mass production of drugs, which would reduce mushrooming healthcare costs and bring huge benefits to public health all over the world

May 1, 2017
Ekathimerini

On the prohibitive cost of drugs to the average Nigerian

Nigeria’s Sun News calls on the executive to take action on the prohibitive cost of drugs for the average Nigerian. The paper cites the current recession, a shortage of foreign exchange to import medicines and the inability of the government to make the services of the National Primary Healthcare Development Agency available to the masses

April 30, 2017
Sun News Online

Anger as Government Scraps Off H/C IIs

There is anger in Uganda over the government’s decision to scrap Health Centre II’s which rural leaders say will gravely worsen health services in rural areas. The Kabarole District chair, Richard Rwabhunga, said “scrapping Health center II’s takes away services from the most vulnerable people in rural areas.” He said this “was a death sentence, considering the less-than-satisfactory state of Uganda’s infrastructure and health referral system

April 29, 2017
Chimp Reports

Pakistan warned of facing Africa-like situation in three to five years

The Joint United Nations programme on HIV Aids has warned Pakistan that it could face an ‘Africa-like’ situation in the next three to five years with respect to HIV Aids. UNAIDS officials in Pakistan based their inference on their observation of the rising prevalence of the disease among injectable drug users, the transgender community and sex workers

April 27, 2017
News International

Uganda: Mayuge Fishermen Demand Anti-HIV/Aids Services

A substantial section of the population in the Mayuge district of Uganda are unhappy with dwindling healthcare services which authorities are rendering to communities that are at most risk of catching HIV/Aids due to the lifestyle surrounding the fishing communities, so there is an urgent need for worthy treatment and services. The need for regular HIV Aids/TB check-ups and information on permissible sex and the distance people have to travel to access healthcare leaves them extremely vulnerable

April 26, 2017
allafrica.com, Monitor uganda

The CEO of HIV

The New York Times interviews Michael Weinstein, boss of the AIDS Healthcare Foundation, one of the biggest AIDS treatment organizations in the world, yet, also one that has earned the distrust of many activists. The interview explains the story of Weinstein and how he has arrived at this place  

April 26, 2017
New York Times

Injured Venezuela protesters face another woe: finding medicine

Demonstrators in Venezuela where the state prosecutor says 437 people have been hurt in a months of protests are struggling to get treatment in a crisis-hit country where basics like antibiotics and painkillers are running short. Families are hauling relatives to multiple health centres, scouring pharmacies for medicine, raising funds to buy pricier drugs on the black market and posting messages on social media begging for medical donations

April 26, 2017
Reuters

Doctors and staffers handling swine-flu cases at the Nagpur GMCH hospital are facing the threat ...

Doctors and staffers handling swine-flu cases at the Nagpur GMCH hospital are facing the threat of the H1N1 virus as none of them have been provided with swine flu vaccines. Every year doctors in the risky environment put themselves at high risk and the Times of India reports this hospital sees two to three of them get infected with TB on average each year

April 25, 2017
Times of India

6 lakh litres of blood wasted in 5 years

In the last five years, 28 lakh units of blood and its components have been discarded by blood banks across India, exposing serious loopholes in the nation’s blood banking system. India faces, on average, an annual shortfall of 30 lakh units of blood. Lack of blood, plasma or platelets often leads to maternal mortality as well as deaths in case of accidents involving severe blood loss

April 24, 2017
Times of India, Deccan Chronicle

Deadlier than Ebola: 745 meningitis deaths expose Nigeria’s faulty healthcare system

The Nigerian media investigated the cerebro meningitis outbreak, visiting the hotspot in Zamfara state, and argued that the more than 700 deaths from meningitis expose Nigeria’s faulty healthcare system

April 23, 2017
Punch Nigeria, Premium Times
April 20, 2017
Ynaija

Opinion: Making it possible for refugee health workers to answer their calling

WHO data says the global health workforce is experiencing a shortage of 7.2m doctors, nurses and midwives – a shortage that will increase to 18m by 2030 unless urgent action is taken. Ironically, a report from the Massachusetts Advisory Council for Refugees and Immigrants in 2014 found there were 3,000 doctors unable to work, unemployed or working in low-wage, low-skilled jobs in Massachusetts alone. This need could be met if we reach out and discover how many there are and then take the necessary steps to restore their professional identities and verify their credentials lost in flight and conflict

April 14, 2017
Devex

Absent staff renders most health centres useless

A report on the functioning of health centres in Barmer reveals that a large number of sub-centres are lying closed and several others are not functional as the staff are missing. The report was compiled by district authorities responding to complaints against the non-functional health centres in rural areas in Barmer

April 12, 2017
Times of India

HIV law promises equality

With the Indian parliament passing the Human Immunodeficiency Virus (HIV) and Acquired Immune Deficiency Syndrome (AIDS) (Prevention and Control) Bill, 2017, people living with HIV Aids are guaranteed equal rights in medical treatment, admission to educational institutions and jobs. The Bill lists grounds on which discrimination against HIV-positive people and those living with them is prohibited

April 12, 2017
The Hindu
April 11, 2017
Financial Express, New Indian Express

Focus on ailing healthcare, lack of doctors on World Health Day

The Times of India reported that World Health Day in Assam was observed against a backdrop of deteriorating healthcare in the public sector, a lack of infrastructure, a shortage of doctors and rising incidences of medical negligence. On top of that, women in Assam are not aware of the importance of hygiene during menstruation nor do they have a comprehensive knowledge of HIV Aids

April 8, 2017
Times of India

23 dead in South Darfur camps lacking medicines

More than twenty people died of an unknown disease in Otash and Lama camps near Nyala in the past two weeks, most of the victims were women or children. Dabanga Sudan reported that many patients have been transferred to Nyala Teaching Hospital because of a lack of medicines and treatment at the camps’ health centres. They cited community leaders as appealing to the international community and aid agencies to provide medicines for the camps

April 7, 2017
Dabanga Sudan
April 11, 2017
Sens 360

Borno runs out of anti-retroviral drugs

The Borno Agency for the Control of HIV Aids said its state run specialist hospital had run out of anti-retroviral drugs at its main centre

April 6, 2017
City Voice

Blame game over high drug prices escalates with new advert

The Pharmaceutical Research and Manufacturers of America, its lobbying association, launched an advertising campaign urging insurers to share with customers more of the benefit of rebates they have negotiated. In response, the main health insurance lobby pushed back and pinned the high cost blame on drug makers

April 6, 2017
Bloomberg

Health needs of men who have sex with men neglected in South Africa

MSM men are twice as likely to be HIV positive partly because their health needs are not being met and they are stigmatized and discriminated against in health facilities in South Africa. The Anova Health Institute explains how it is working to sensitise health facilities to help them become more MSM friendly through its Health4Men programme

April 4, 2017
Health24.com

Linking benefits for AIDS patients to Aadhaar triggers privacy concerns

Linking people living with HIV AIDS with Aadhaar cards has allegedly ‘driven away patients from hospitals and antiretroviral therapy centres’ in Madhya Pradesh. The patients feared that the compulsory submission of an Aadhaar card to get free medicines and medical check-ups under a government’s AIDS control scheme, could lead to disclosure of their identity, inviting social stigma

April 3, 2017
Hindustan Times
March 29, 2017
HT Syndication

Polio vaccine in short supply in private hospitals

The Hindu says that the polio vaccine is in short supply in private hospitals in Hyderabad. After India’s switch to bivalent oral polio vaccine from trivalent oral polio vaccine, there has been a global shortage of IPV

April 3, 2017
The Hindu

In numbers: Maharashtra’s under-funded health services keep its junior doctors in the line of ...

What is not being highlighted in Maharashtra sufficiently is the correlation between understaffed and inadequately resourced public hospitals and the growing discontent among patients seeking care in these hospitals. A symptom of this is the violence against doctors, at which they are protesting. Violence against doctors is not about doctor-patient conflict as much as it is about a lack of funds and personnel to attend to the sick 

April 1, 2017
Scroll India

UN: 50% of Yemen Health Facilities Closed, Medicines Urgently Needed

More than 14m people in Yemen have no access to health services, the UN health agency said, warning that transportation of medical personnel and treatment for the injured is getting increasingly difficult as this week heralds the third anniversary of the conflict

March 30, 2017
Alahed News

Why do residents work such long hours?

Resident doctors call the practice of assigning shifts stretching 24-48 hours inhuman and an exploitation of doctors. In contrast, the medical establishment believes it is routine practice and it has been there for ages and should continue. A spokesperson said ‘it is part of the learning process. Residents need to observe and follow a patient over a period of time continuously and see if the disease is progressing or worsening, and this can only be done when they are on longer shift patterns’

March 29, 2017
Times of India

EU rapid drug approval plan worries some national agencies

A push by the European Medicines Agency to speed up the approval of new drugs that show promise is running into stiff resistance from some of the national agencies that will ultimately decide if the medicines are worth buying. Critics worry that lowering the requirement for lengthy clinical trials, selling drugs with relatively little testing data, even if the go-ahead comes with strict limits, will expose patients to greater risks 

March 29, 2017
CNBC, Reuters

Trump FDA Nominee Wants Lower Drug Costs With More Generics

President Trump’s pick to head the FDA is one of the most vigorous advocates of lowering drug costs by approving generics faster. He’s particularly focused on complex medications that combine old drugs with newer deliveries, as well as those with unusually complicated formulations. The main generic drug law, crafted more than 30 years ago didn’t contemplate complex drugs and so it does not provide an efficient and predictable path for enabling generic entrants – Scott Gottlieb wrote in an Oct 24 Forbes column. Revamping the process is likely to be his focus

March 29, 2017
Bloomberg

Jharkhand will soon be second state in India provides 'free health services'

The Health Minister for the state of Jharkhand said he is looking to encourage Public Private Partnership and that Jharkhand is going to be the second state in the country to offer ‘free health services’ for all minors in government-run hospitals

March 28, 2017
Siasat.com

Men who have sex with men face difficulty getting HIV medicine due to stigma

Homosexuals are a vulnerable group who struggle to access treatment for HIV/AIDS and other sexually transmitted diseases because of the stigma and discrimination against them, health professionals and NGOs from Eastern and Southern African countries were told at a Johannesburg event to discuss HIV/AIDS prevention and treatment 

March 28, 2017
Business Day

Culture of disease diagnosis inevitable for health nation

In an opinion article for the Tanzania Daily News the editorial argues that it is time to introduce a culture of disease diagnosis in the Tanzanian healthcare system. He argues that identifying troubles early mean many diseases are far more treatable and the costs of treatment are lower as they are managed at this initial stage

March 28, 2017
Daily News

MP blames provincial govt for drugs shortage

In Papua New Guinea the local Kerema MP has called out the Gulf provincial government for not addressing the issue of medicine shortages at the Kerema General Hospital. The MP said he had been told there was no medicine at the local hospital and patients were told to use herbal medicine while waiting for new supplies. He said the government must immediately address the issue because people needed the basics like malaria and tuberculosis drugs urgently

March 28, 2017
The National

Zambia fears health programs will suffer under Donald Trump's proposal to cut foreign aid

Critical programs across Africa will be impacted  by significant foreign aid cuts proposed by the Trump administration, Zambia warned. A White House blueprint calling for a 28% cut in State Department funding, means drastic reductions in funding to UN agencies with knock on effects around the world; the country’s vice president said a range of health programs involving maternal health, HIV/AIDS and malaria eradication could well be impacted

March 28, 2017
abc.net.au

City has 54 doctors per lakh population against Beijing’s 355

The Times of India reports that there are only 54 doctors per 100,000 population in Mumbai, which is poor when compared to 296 in Shanghai, 282 in Tokyo, 393 in New York, 355 in Beijing and 85 in Sao Paulo. The upsurge in demand for medical services in India is not being matched by the training of health professionals

March 27, 2017
Times of India

Lone surgeon at NICVD in Karachi, as 15,000 children lose life battles every year

More than 15,000 children die in Pakistan from cardiac disease. Despite that. Professor Sohail Bangash is the only paediatric cardiac surgeon at the National Institute of Cardiovascular Diseases, which is the largest public-sector hospital in the Sindh-Balochistan region catering to cardiac care

March 26, 2017
Tribune Pakistan

Venezuela's Maduro asks U.N. to help ease medicine shortages

Triple digit inflation and a decaying economy have left medication ranging from simple anti-inflammatory drugs to chemotherapy medication out of reach for most Venezuelans

March 25, 2017
Reuters

Counties to share health experts to address shortage

Governors from 13 counties that make up the Kenyan Lake Region Economic Bloc have initiated a plan that will see the devolved units share medical specialists to address shortage. Hospitals will specialise in treating different ailments and reduce patients in key referral hospitals. The plan also involves tackling the high growing disease burden and prevalence of malaria, HIV and infant mortality

March 24, 2017
Daily Nation, Business Daily

Tamil Nadu: Nothing positive in HIV bill, say patients

HIV positive people came together to protest against a recent government proposal to ‘take measures, as far as possible, to provide anti-retroviral treatment, diagnostics and treatment for opportunistic infections to those living with HIV’. They argue the bill fails to ensure free and complete treatment of HIV positive people and want the phrase ‘as far as possible’ removed from the proposed law 

March 24, 2017
Deccan Chronicle, New Indian Express, Hindustan Times

Poor patients turned away as doctors strike against assaults in India

Reuters reported that poor patients in western India were unable to access care for a fourth day at state hospital as doctors maintained a strike in protest at assaults by patients families. The High Court in Mumbai ordered doctors back to work in Maharashtra but asked the government to ensure their security, adding more pressure to an overburdened public healthcare system

March 23, 2017
Reuters
March 25, 2017
First Post
March 27, 2017
The Hindu

Beijing ends hospital markups on drug prices

Beijing announced public hospitals will end mark-ups on drug prices to separate medical treatment and drug sales and to lower costs to patients. Previously, drug prices were marked up by 15%, but this is now disallowed in over 3,600 hospitals and medical institutions across the city from April 8 

March 22, 2017
xinhuanet

53 doctors attacked in two years, not a single conviction

The Bombay High Court criticized resident doctors at hospitals in Maharashtra for their strike because of the impact it was having on patients. The young doctors remained firm in their demand for adequate security to protect them from recent attacks by enraged relatives of patients in Dhule and Sion in Mumbai

March 22, 2017
Mumbai Mirror
March 21, 2017
The Guardian

13 counties in western Kenya agree to joint delivery of health services

Thirteen counties in western Kenya have agreed to work together to improve delivery of healthcare services, particularly on malaria and HIV/Aids. The counties forming the Lake Region Bloc are in discussion to develop a joint blue print to address joint health service challenges

March 21, 2017
Standard Media

Britain to launch fund for small charities helping world's poorest

Britain is to launch a fund to help small charities scale up their work with some of the world’s most vulnerable communities. The fund is to be launched in the summer and the minister said ‘these organizations are a crucial part of the UK’s offer on international aid and development’ 

March 20, 2017
Reuters

Cancer rates are soaring in Africa, yet Tanzania's radiotherapy hub stands idle

The Guardian reports on Mwanza in Tanzania, where a state of the art oncology clinic lacks the funding and staff to get its equipment up and running, despite thousands of people requiring its life saving treatment

March 20, 2017
The Guardian

'I thought cancer was a disease for the elderly': tackling Nigeria's 80% mortality rate

NGO’s are working hard to change cancer treatment in Nigeria, despite poor facilities and a lack of awareness. The Guardian reports on the work of the Nigeria-based Health and Psychological Trust Centre, known as Project Pink Blue, which is trying to bring best practice cancer care to Abuja

March 20, 2017
The Guardian

LAPO blames government, institutions, others, for poor access to health service by rural dweller...

NGO Lift Above Poverty said it believes ‘low government spending, poor or weak institutions, inadequate supervision and inadequate health professionals’ are the main reasons why Nigerians outside of the cities in rural areas are receiving such poor access to healthcare 

March 17, 2017
Business Daily

GOP Health Bill Threatens to Throw Free-Care Burden Back on Hospitals

Unlike insurers, drug makers and other healthcare companies, acute care hospitals in the USA cannot refuse to serve patients because of a lack of ability to pay. As the number of people without insurance fell under Obamacare, hospitals’ uncompensated care costs dropped as well, according to the American Hospital Association. Under the new Trump healthcare proposals the Congressional Budget Office projects an increase of 24m uninsured by 2026, so who pays becomes an even more central issue  

March 17, 2017
Bloomberg

Indian drugmakers face squeeze in U.S. healthcare market

India’s small and medium-sized generic drug makers say the threat of tougher rules and higher barriers for outsiders in the U.S. healthcare market will force many of them to find a niche, or focus their expansion efforts on other countries. India supplies just under a third of medicines sold in the U.S. and cut-price generics sold by Indian companies have been critical in bringing down prices

March 17, 2017
Reuters

Amid Dramatic Cuts, HIV/AIDS Funding Spared in New Trump Budget

One surprise winner in the proposed Trump administration budget will be HIV/AIDS funding, despite a nearly 18% cut to the Department of Health and Human Services. It has been made clear that the new budget ‘promises to provide sufficient resources to maintain current commitments and all current patient levels on HIV/AIDS treatment under the President’s Emergency Plans for AIDS Relief’

March 17, 2017
NBC News

Former Drug Czar Says GOP Health Bill Would Cut Access To Addiction Treatment

Michael Botticelli, who served as President Obama’s National Drug Control Policy chief, said ‘he is concerned the proposed Republican health plan will reduce access to health services for people with addiction’

March 15, 2017
NPR

Study shows healthcare in Syria now a target of war

Published to mark the sixth anniversary of the Syrian crisis, a new study used data from multiple sources to assess the conflict’s impact on healthcare and health workers. It found that a policy of ‘weaponisation’ of the healthcare system in Syria occurred, by which the people’s need for healthcare was used against them by denying them access

March 14, 2017
Reuters

Republican plan to repeal Obamacare would leave millions uninsured: report

Fourteen million American would lose medical insurance by next year ,under a Republican plan to dismantle Obamacare that would also reduce the budget deficit, the non-partisan congressional research office said on Monday, throwing President Trump and the Republicans onto the defensive, as they press forward with replacement legislation

March 14, 2017
Reuters

Kenya doctors end three-month strike after deal with government

Kenyan doctors ended a three-month public hospital strike on Tuesday, after reaching agreement on pay and working conditions. This has ended the standoff which threatened to embarrass the government before August’s elections 

March 14, 2017
Reuters

Care coordination in U.S. lags other developed nations

U.S. patients are more likely to experience gaps in coordination among healthcare providers than their counterparts in other high-income nations, a new study suggests

March 13, 2017
Reuters

Kenya: You Must Return to Work Before Any More Talks, Govt Tells Doctors

The Kenyan government has instructed doctors to return to work before the government will engage with them in more negotiations over pay and conditions

March 12, 2017
allafrica.com

East Africa is in ICU; the collapsed health sector says it all

The Kenyan doctors strike, now in its fourth month, has paralyzed services in public hospitals. Patients have been forced to turn to private hospitals, with those who cannot afford the high cost of medical services in such hospitals simply left to fend for themselves 

March 11, 2017
Citizen TV

‘Fully doctor-dependant model of primary health care must change’

Dr K Srinath Reddy has been appointed to advise the Odisha state government on health . He spoke to The Times of India about his new advisory role, indicating that the ‘fully doctor-dependent model of primary health care must change’ in his opinion 

March 11, 2017
Times of India

GOP health plan bill puts $1B CDC funding for disease prevention at risk

Among the potential casualties of the GOP’s bill to repeal the Affordable Care Act is the $1bn for the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention to fund essential public health programmes, including the prevention of disease outbreaks  

March 10, 2017
Fierce Heathcare

Romania's healthcare exodus

In the Romanian healthcare system, doctors go through six years of medical school and then three to five years as a hospital resident, treating patients while working under the supervision of senior staff. Then, each year, Romania bleeds tens of thousands of doctors and nurses, dentists and pharmacists – many of whom are lured abroad by what Romania lacks, significantly higher pay, modern infrastructure and a functional healthcare system

March 9, 2017
Reuters, Reuters

Over 30 killed as gunmen dressed as medics attack Afghan military hospital

Gunmen dressed as medics attacked a military hospital in the Afghan capital on Wednesday, and battled security forces for hours, killing 30 people and wounding dozens more 

March 8, 2017
Reuters

Generic Firms Can Export Bayer Drugs for R&D in India Ruling

An Indian court granted a pair of drug makers the right to export the main ingredients of two of Bayer’s top-selling drugs to develop generics in other countries. This is a decision which has the potential to speed up copycat versions of some of the industry’s most profitable products

March 8, 2017
Bloomberg

Lower $1,000 Pill Price? We'd Love It, Says Express Scripts

Gilead and Express Scripts Holding are in a spat over drug costs and rebate prices, with Express Scripts CEO challenging Gilead’s CEO to lower prices on their more expensive drugs

March 7, 2017
Bloomberg

The House Republicans’ health-care bill is a thicket of bad incentives

The former acting administrator for the U.S. Centers for Medicare and Medicaid Services from 2015-2017, wrote an opinion article for The Washington Post about the new American Health Care Act, describing the Republicans’ new bill as a thicket of bad incentives  

March 7, 2017
Bloomberg

Attackers Target Afghanistan Health Centers 240 Times in Two Years: Report

Hospitals and clinics in Afghanistan have increasingly been targeted by armed groups over the past two years, weakening an already degenerated health care system, a children’s rights group said in a report issued Monday 

March 6, 2017
Newsweek, Reuters

Drop in London HIV rates 'may be due to internet drug PrEP'

A drug being bought online is believed to be the reason for a 40% drop in new rates of HIV in London. Pre-exposure prophylaxis, or PrEP, reduces the risk of catching the virus and costs around £40 per month. Four London clinics are reporting dramatic falls in new cases of HIV last year, when compared to 2015, and they suggest the new drug may be the reason why 

March 5, 2017
Sky News

Ministry of Health suspends 18 health workers for obstructing Polio vaccine program

The Nepalese Ministry of Health suspended 18 health workers, including three health office chiefs, on the charge of obstructing the Polio vaccine administration programme 

March 5, 2017
My Republica, My Republica

South Korea fines Novartis over kickbacks, suspends sales of some drugs

South Korea has decided to fine Novartis over paying kickbacks to doctors in exchange for recommending the company’s drugs. The government said it has levied a fine on 30 drug items and banned sales of 12 variations of 3 drug types, including Alzheimer drug Exelon, for three months

March 2, 2017
Reuters

Communicable diseases

Scales tip in AIDS fight as death rates decline, treatment rates rise

The scales have tipped in the fight against AIDS, with more than half of people infected with HIV now getting treatment and AIDS-related deaths almost halving since 2005, the United Nations said. In its latest global report on the pandemic, which has killed around 35 million people worldwide since it began in the 1980s, the UNAIDS agency said there were particularly encouraging signs in Africa, a continent ravaged by the disease

July 20, 2017
Reuters

Hepatitis B affects 3.5 million Ugandans

Ugandan government figures show the prevalence rate of Hepatitis is 10% compared to the 7.3% of HIV/AIDs in Uganda. One of the biggest challenges in the fight against the disease is that people who test positive and are referred for treatment do not even know where to go. There are few available facilities for testing Hepatitis viral load across the country and they are very expensive with poorly trained staff

July 20, 2017
New Vision

Decline in infrastructure, support systems hampering HIV fight in SA

In a new report, UNAIDS cautioned that while new HIV infections had fallen dramatically in the past two decades, especially among children, the trend among adults has stalled and even risen in a number of places over the past five years. Cuts in foreign aid will have an impact on the national fight against HIV/Aids, but the decline in South Africa’s critical infrastructure and support systems has an equally negative effect on eradicating the disease. “Structural issues need to be addressed by government. You can’t do Aids prevention when people are hungry, homeless or unemployed” UNAIDS said

June 13, 2017
The Citizen, The Citizen, Oscar OFM

Vaccines may be the way forward for malaria eradication in India

Dr Dharminder Nagar, MD of Paras Healthcare, writes an opinion article for Business Standard in which he outlines a 5-point agenda to take immunization programmes across India to the next level

May 23, 2017
Business Standard

Private providers sense opportunity in Africa healthcare

A 2012 report by IFC estimated the market for healthcare in sub-Saharan Africa would more than double to $35bn by 2016. In the decade to 2020, it said some $25bn-$30bn would be needed in investment in physical healthcare assets alone, including hospitals and clinics. Now it is now longer just about communicable diseases, as it was believed to be five years ago. As lifestyles change and diseases of affluence gain traction private providers in Africa sense an opportunity as most African healthcare systems are developing from a woefully low base

May 10, 2017
Financial Times

Philips Partnership with Kenya and the UN will Advance Healthcare Agenda

Royal Philips announced its support for a new Kenyan government and UN initiative aimed at strengthening primary and community healthcare in Africa. Philips is the first private sector partner to establish an SDG Partnership Platform in Kenya for accelerating primary healthcare trans formation in support of universal healthcare coverage

May 10, 2017
Africa Science News

WHO urges India to up spending on healthcare

Addressing the SYMHEALTH 2017 international conference on healthcare, WHO representative Henk Mekedam told delegates that India needs to increase its spending on healthcare. “Currently investment amounts to 1.2% of GDP. This has pushed 60m people below the poverty line.” WHO had previously recommended 2.5% of the country’s GDP should be allocated to healthcare. Mekedam went on “globalization leaves us far better connected but this poses challenges such as the faster spread of infectious diseases”

May 7, 2017
Times of India

Global foundation launches value-based healthcare pilots

Key healthcare stakeholders, led by the World Economic Forum, plan pilot programmes this year to show the value of a new model for healthcare that would track and pay for treatment based on how well it works rather than the volume of care. The first pilot being set up in Atlanta Georgia will focus on treating heart failure. Medical device and pharmaceutical companies are starting to realize that if they don’t change the nature of healthcare their prices will be slashed. If they want healthy profits they will have to prove that their drug actually lowers the overall costs of care

April 26, 2017
Reuters

A call for implementation science and systems innovation in global health

Healthcare pilot programmes cannot turn into progress without implementation science, which examines why some of the innovations that work in the lab fail in the field. Therefore, accelerating health improvements is only possible with different modes of delivery. Solving the conundrum of having much better drugs and interventions than ever before but them being seemingly useless as the world cannot get them to the people who need them most

April 25, 2017
Devex

Polio in Afghanistan 'Americans bomb our children daily, why would they care?'

After being denied access by the Taliban for 15 months, health workers resumed a vaccination campaign agaianst polio in parts of Kunduz province in northern Afghanistan. Days before the Taliban allowed vaccinators access, a 14-month old girl in Kunduz was found to have been paralysed by polio. Until the inoculation was blocked the disease had been all but eradicated in Afghanistan

April 10, 2017
Guardian, El Diario

Opinion: My vision for the WHO

One of the three candidates to become Director General of the World Health Organization talks to devex.com about his vision for the future of the World Health Organization should his campaign turn out successful

March 27, 2017
Devex

Cuomo’s $1.4 Billion Plan Targets Brooklyn in Fight Against Poor Health and Poverty

New York State Governor, Andrew M. Cuomo, announced a comprehensive plan to direct U.S.$1.4bn in the state’s resources to long-suffering areas of central Brooklyn. The plan would allot the biggest chunk of money to healthcare $700m. Citing persistent problems of poverty, violence and poor health the idea of anti-poverty initiatives is stirring talk of a possible run by Cuomo for the presidency in 2020

March 9, 2017
New York Times