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Tag search: "Land Rights"

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India plans overhaul of colonial-era land titles

India is considering updating its colonial-era land records with a system that cuts fraud and protects the poor as mounting wrangles over land crimp economic growth, an official said. But the overhaul could take decades to come good, he added, despite a growing thirst for land deals in fast-growing India. "Every transaction is imperfect, and the onus of establishing ownership is on the buyer," said S. Chockalingam, director of land records in western Maharashtra state

July 26, 2017
Trust.org

Property rights campaign for women takes aim at patriarchy in South Asia

Across India, only 13 percent of farmland is owned by women. Activists have launched a campaign in South Asia to appeal to men to stand up for the property rights of their daughters, wives and sisters and ask women to demand their share as a way to curb violence against women in the region. Property for Her was launched on social media this week, with messages on Twitter and Facebook, as well as a petition on change.org. The petition asks parents to promise to leave their daughter an equal share of property, and brothers to stand with their sisters in ensuring her rights

July 6, 2017
Trust.org

Politics of Death: Land conflict and murder go 'hand in hand' in Brazil

The scale of violence, role of farming in the economy, hazy nature of property ownership and impunity make land conflicts particularly dangerous in Brazil. Brazil`s National Indian Foundation (FUNAI), the government agency responsible for protecting the land rights of indigenous people, has missed its own deadline to demarcate the land, or in essence to ring fence it for indigenous people. "The government only thinks about agribusiness, not us Guarani-Kaiowa," indigenous activist Elson Gomes said. "We don`t have enough land or a place of our own to survive"

June 27, 2017
Trust.org

Indian police thwart indigenous people in land complaints, activists say

Indigenous people in central India are thwarted by police when trying to file complaints about their land being forcefully taken, activists say, highlighting the enormous challenges they face in securing their land rights. More than 80 tribal men and women in Chhattisgarh state who say they were coerced, threatened and duped into giving up their land, could not file First Information Reports last week in Raigarh city. "They didn`t even realise they no longer owned their land, or who the new owners were. That is why it took them so long to approach the police, who are always resistant to filing FIRs in these matters," Sudha Bharadwaj, a rights lawyer, said

June 19, 2017
Trust.org

'No place for the poor' in India's Smart Cities, campaigners say

Prime Minister Narendra Modi`s Smart Cities Mission aims to modernise 100 cities by 2020. An ambitious government plan to upgrade India`s cities risks further marginalising poor and minority communities and hastening slum evictions, while failing to address the reasons villagers move to urban areas, campaigners said. The $7.5 billion plan does not address the needs and rights of poor women and marginalised groups including minorities and migrants, according to a report by New Delhi-based advocacy group Housing and Land Rights Network, India (HLRN). The drive for Smart Cities has already triggered evictions of people from slums and informal settlements in cities including Indore, Bhubaneswar, Delhi and Kochi without adequate compensation or alternate accommodation

June 12, 2017
Trust.org

Deadly protests in India highlight despair of poor landless farmers

The killing of five farmers in clashes with police in central India exposes the plight of landless peasants struggling to pay back debt with meagre earnings from lower produce prices, activists say. Low prices for produce such as lentils and cereals amid a glut in supply have triggered protests by farmers in central Madhya Pradesh state and neighbouring Maharashtra, where officials have said they will waive loans of some defaulting farmers. But the waivers will only benefit farmers who own land and do not address the main reasons for farmers` distress including landlessness and the small size of holdings, said Kishor Tiwari, head of a committee set up by the Maharashtra government to address farmers` issues

June 9, 2017
Trust.org

China's $10 billion strategic project in Myanmar sparks local ire

Myanmar`s Kyauk Pyu port is key to China`s "Belt and Road" plans as an entry point for the pipeline that gives China an alternative route for Middle East oil and is part of the nearly $10 billion Kyauk Pyu Special Economic Zone, a scheme at the heart of fast-warming Myanmar-China relations and whose success is crucial for Aung San Suu Kyi. Internal documents show up to 20,000 people may be relocated. Although the Chinese developer claims the project will create 100,000 new jobs, few of the villagers suffering from relocation have been able to land work on this project. Suspicion of China runs deep in Myanmar, and public hostility due to environmental and other concerns has delayed or derailed Chinese mega-projects in the country in the past

June 9, 2017
Trust.org

First woman to lead Indonesia's indigenous peoples alliance

Thomson Reuters Foundation news spoke to Rukka Sombolinggi, 44, of the Torajan tribe from the highlands of Sulawesi island, who this week became the first woman at the helm of the Indigenous Peoples Alliance of the Archipelago (AMAN). She discussed how indigenous women in Indonesia are taking the lead in the fight to protect their land and communities as a rise in conflicts threatens tribes living on lands coveted by extractive and logging companies

May 29, 2017
Trust.org

In drought-stricken Mali, women manoeuvre for land - and a future

Malian men control access to land and decide which parts women are allowed to farm - that`s a problem for women as erratic weather increases competition for land and harvests. In some cases, crop losses on their own land have led men to encroach on land traditionally farmed by women and even steal women`s crops, according to development workers in the area. But an experiment in securing women`s access to small plots of land - and training them to grow crops in difficult climate conditions - aims to change that

May 29, 2017
Trust.org